BWV 51 Jauchzet Gott in allen Landen!

Fifteenth Sunday after Trinity and For any occasion (et in ogni tempo).

4. Substitute verse to Johann Gramann's "Nun lob, mein Seel, mein Seel, den Herren," Königsberg, 1548 (Wackernagel, III, #968ff.)

Probably 17 September 1730, Leipzig.

BG 12, 2; NBA I/22.



1. Arias (S)

Praise ye God in ev'ry nation!
All that heaven and the world
Of created order hold
Must be now his fame exalting,
And we would to this our God
/ With the angels let's today /(1)
Likewise now present an off'ring
/ To our God a song of praise sing/(2)
For that he midst cross and woe
/ For that he midst spite and pain /(3)
Always hath stood close beside us.

2. Recit. (S)

In prayer we now thy temple face,(4)
Where God's own honor dwelleth,(5)
Where his good faith,
Each day renewed,
The purest bliss dispenseth.
We praise him for what he for us hath done.
Although our feeble voice before his wonders stammers,
Perhaps e'en modest praise to him will yet bring pleasure.

3. Aria (S)

Highest, make thy gracious goodness
Henceforth ev'ry morning new.
/ E'en in our dominion new. /(6)

    Thus before thy father's love
    Should as well the grateful spirit
    Through a righteous life show plainly
    That we are thy children truly.

4. Chorale (S)

Now laud and praise with honor
God Father, Son, and Holy Ghost!
May he in us make increase
What he us with grace hath pledged,
So that we firmly trust him,
Entirely turn to him,
Make him our true foundation,
That our heart, mind and will
Steadfast to him be cleaving;
To this we sing here now:
Amen, we shall achieve it,
This is our heart's firm faith!

5. Aria (S)

Alleluia!(7)


1. This line is found in the OSt as an alternate text to the immediately preceding line.

2. This line is found in the OSt as an alternate text to the immediately preceding line.

3. This line is found in the OSt as an alternate text to the immediately preceding line.

4. Cf. Ps. 138:2.

5. Cf. Ps. 26:8.

6. This line is found in the OSt as an alternate text to the immediately preceding line.

7. Bach adds the Alleluia, probably as an etymology of the opening words of the cantata: in Hebrew hallelu-yah means 'praise ye Jehovah," i.e., Jauchzet Gott.


© Copyright Z. Philip Ambrose


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