University of Vermont

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Chemistry

UVM Chemistry Research: Adam Whalley

Severin T. Schneebeli

Severin Schneebeli

Severin T. Schneebeli, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry

  • M.A., Columbia University, NY, NY, 2007
  • Ph.D., Columbia University, NY, NY, 2011
  • International Institute for Nanotechnology (IIN) postdoctoral fellowship, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, 2011-2014
  • Assistant Professor of Chemistry, University of Vermont, 2014
  • Curriculum vitae
Area of expertise

organic synthesis, theoretical/computational chemistry, materials chemistry, mesosynthesis

Contact Information

Email: Severin.Schneebeli@uvm.edu

Phone: (802) 656-0252

Office: Cook Rm A332

Website:
http://www.uvm.edu/mesosynthesis

Research

Programmable materials chemistry at the mesoscale

The research in my group aims to design and create functional, synthetic materials with controlled molecular arrangements at the mesoscale, broadly defined as bridging the nano and microscales in the range of 1-10,000 nm. Gaining insight into how to assemble mesoscale materials in predictable ways — a process, which we refer to as mesosynthesis in my group — is one of the most important future scientific challenges. By mastering mesosynthesis, new materials will likely become accessible, which will display superior performance for applications in areas such as biomedicine, renewable energy, and heterogeneous catalysis. Students engaged in mesosynthesis gain valuable interdisciplinary experience in organic synthesis, materials characterization, and computer modeling.

Specific mesosynthesis challenges addressed in my laboratory are how to (i) readily synthesize programmable complex molecular shapes, (ii) build, replicate, and evolve non-natural, supramolecular polymers, and (iii) perform catalysis on larger length scales. Budding applications of these research projects, with biomedical innovation and a sustainable energy economy in mind, include novel ways to build programmable sensors and catalysts, artificial antibodies, tissue replacements, as well as photonic crystals.

Schneebeli graphic

Selected Publications

Schneebeli, S. T.; Frasconi, M.; Liu, Z.; Wu, Y.; Gardner, D. M.; Strutt, N. L.; Cheng, C.; Carmieli, R.; Wasielewski, M. R.; Stoddart, J. F. “Electron Sharing and Anion-π Recognition in Molecular Triangular Prisms.” Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2013, 52, 13100-13104. VIP, Back Cover

Schneebeli, S. T.; Cheng, C.; Hartlieb, K. J.; Strutt, N. L.; Sarjeant, A. A.; Stern, C. L.; Stoddart, J. F. “Asararenes – A Family of Large Aromatic Macrocycles.” Chem. Eur. J. 2013, 19, 3860-3868. Cover Art, VIP, Highlights in Chem. Views (Feb 2013) and Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. (Mar 2013)

Vazquez, H.; Skouta, R.; Schneebeli, S. T.; Kamenetska, M.; Breslow, R.; Venkataraman, L.; Hybertsen, M. S. “Probing the Conductance Superposition Law in Single-Molecule Circuits with Parallel Paths.” Nature Nanotech. 2012, 7, 663-667.

Li, J.; Schneebeli, S. T.; Bylund, J.; Farid, R.; Friesner, R. A. “IDSite: An Accurate Approach to Predict P450-Mediated Drug Metabolism.” J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2011, 7, 3829-3845.

Schneebeli, S. T.; Kamenetska, M.; Cheng, Z.; Skouta, R.; Friesner, R. A.; Venkataraman, L.; Breslow, R. “Single-Molecule Conductance through Multiple π–π-Stacked Benzene Rings Determined with Direct Electrode-to-Benzene Ring Connections.” J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2011, 133, 2136-2139. Cover Art. Highlight in Nature Materials (Mar 2011)

Schneebeli, S. T.; Hall, M. L.; Breslow, R.; Friesner, R. A. “Quantitative DFT Modeling of the Enantiomeric Excess for Dioxirane-Catalyzed Epoxidations.” J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 3965-3973.

Last modified October 17 2014 09:43 AM

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