University of Vermont

Dean Miller Tapped to Lead Two National Teacher Preparation Boards

Fayneese Miller, dean of the College of Education and Social Services, has been elected to leadership positions of two national educational organizations focused on high quality professional preparation for teachers and school administrators.

Miller, former chair of the Vermont State Board of Education, is chair-elect of the board for the American Association for Colleges of Teacher Education, a national alliance of educator preparation programs dedicated to high-quality professional development of teachers and school leaders in order to enhance PK-12 student learning.

“AACTE is fortunate to have a tradition of dedicated leadership from members of the board of directors,” said Sharon Robinson, executive director and CEO of AACTE. “Fayneese Miller will serve in that tradition. The strength of her commitment to the profession, and her ability to include all voices in critical debates will be especially helpful in these times of challenge and change. 

The 800 institutions that comprise AACTE work to develop and promote evidence-based educator preparation guidelines in the areas of standards, curriculum, assessment and accountability. It also focuses on diversity issues by advocating for an increase in diversity among candidates applying for teaching and administrative positions and by improving curriculum to ensure that all educators can serve diverse learners.

Miller, who serves on the U.S. Department of Justice’s National Truancy Prevention Association Board, has also been named President-elect of the Council of Academic Deans of Research Education Institutions. Originally named the Association of Colleges and Schools of Education in State Universities and Land Grant Colleges and Affiliated Private Universities, CADREI consists of deans of education from research and land grant institutions across North America dedicated to the preparation of education personnel through the formulation of plans, policies, and programs to make its member institutions more effective.