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Graduate Program
Mechanical Engineering

Research Facilities

The Mechanical Engineering Program maintains a wide range of facilities for state-of-the-art research. Descriptions of some of our labs are given below.

In addition to these laboratories within the School of Engineering, Mechanical Engineering faculty make extensive use of facilities at the Vermont Advanced Computing Center and the UVM College of Medicine, as well as at national supercomputing facilities.

Complex, Adaptive & Precision Systems Laboratory (CAPSEL)

Materials Nanomechanics Laboratory

Microfluid Mechanics Laboratory

Turbulence and Multiscale Simulation Laboratory

Vortex and Particulate Flow Laboratory



Complex, Adaptive & Precision Systems Laboratory (CAPSEL)

The Complex, Adaptive & Precision Systems Laboratory (CAPSEL), directed by Dryver Huston, focuses on research areas that have yet to evolve into fully matured fields. Such topics include robotics for the inspection, servicing, and protection of structures; ultra-wideband (UWB) and ground penetrating radar systems; advanced X-ray lithography process techniques; and biomedical topics. While these topics are diverse and cover a large variety of disciplines, they are all based on complex systems with in-depth factor interactions.


Materials Nanomechanics Laboratory

The Materials Nanomechanics Laboratory, directed by Fred Sansoz, focuses on the mechanics of nanostructured materials at small, atomic scale. Fields of innovation and intense miniaturization such as nanotechnology, microelectronics and bioengineering must gain crucial understanding from deformation and non-equilibrium processes in extremely small volume materials. In this area, the lab's goal is oriented toward exploiting novel phenomena at the nanoscale with broader impact on mechanical devices, energy conversion and sensor technology.


Microfluid Mechanics Laboratory

The focus of the Microfluid Mechanics Laboratory, directed by Darren Hitt, lies in the investigation of complex fluid-mechanical and transport phenomena on microscopic length scales. The laboratory features experimental, theoretical and computational capabilities with most projects involving a combination. Biomedical interests include microcirculatory blood flow phenomena.


Turbulence and Multiscale Simulation Laboratory

The Turbulence and Multiscale Simulation Laboratory, directed by Yves Dubief, focuses on the understanding of complex mechanical sytems in which fluid flows play a predominant role: turbulence, fluid structure interaction, complex fluid flows, micro multiphase fluid. The objective of research conducted in the lab is to address current and upcoming engineering problems in a variety of fields, such as combustion, turbulence control, heat transfer, micro-propulsion and bio-flows.


Vortex and Particulate Flow Laboratory

The Vortex and Particulate Flow Laboratory, directed by Jeff Marshall, specializes in fluid dynamics research related to vorticity and particulate transport in incompressible fluids. Specific areas of fundamental research thrust include vortex-structure interaction; turbulent vortex-dominated flows; particulate transport, collision and adhesion; multiscale computational methods; vorticity-based computational methods; and thin-film flows. Targeted application areas include bio-fluid flows (blood, digestive); environmental flows (sediment transport, pump intakes); energy production (biofuel combustion); vehicle flow fields (cooling systems, tire spray); and rotorcraft aerodynamics (rotor wake vortices, wake-tail interaction).


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