Posts Tagged socially responsible

Empowering Women Empowers EVERYONE

Posted on April 11, 2013 with No Comments

Ursula Burns, CEO of Xerox

When you think of a company’s “ethics,” what comes to mind? Sustainability? Fair trade? While these are important, let’s talk about an ethical issue that everyone has a stake in: gender equity.. In the US, women earn more than 50% of the graduate degrees, and yet they only hold a small percentage of the highest paying positions. This is not only an issue of fairness, but an issue of economics. That’s right, companies with more women in power succeed. In fact, they do better than companies with male-dominated executive boards.

On this note, when you are choosing a company to work for, do a little research and ask these questions:

1.)   Does the company offer opportunities for women to be promoted? Do they adamantly encourage women to do so?

2.)   Does the company have a committee/ task force dedicated to diverse hiring practices? Do they consider hiring women a business imperative?

3.)   Does the company engage in regular data, policy, and practice review in the area of gender equity? Similarly, do they have an annual goal for the number of women they hire?

Not every facet of this issue can be discussed in a short blog post. But the main point is that if you are a female college student/recent graduate entering the workforce, you are likely very qualified. And if you are a non-female college student/recent graduate entering the workforce, you will not lose out by being a part of the fight to empower women. Helping women succeed is not a zero-sum game; everyone wins!

~Sam, Career Peer Advisor

Doing Good, Doing Well: Making Good!

Posted on April 26, 2012 with No Comments

Hands on the Earth

On Friday, April 20th, 2012, Billy Parish spoke at UVM regarding his book Making Good: Finding Meaning, Money and Community in a Changing World.

His book covers six steps to take in order to “make good”:

Reflect, Adapt, Connect, Design, Launch and Organize

During his talk, Billy provided some ways to get started:

  1. Identify the change you want to make in the world. Now. Think big, think mission, think forward.  Where do you really want to spend your energy “making good?”
  2. Choose a skill to master that will most impact this change.  What skill do you want to master in order to bring about this change?  Achieving mastery, according to Malcolm Gladwell, takes 10,000 hours of practice – so how do you want to spend your time?
  3. Gain mastery by one (or several) learning pathways: school, apprenticeship, on the job training & the do-it-yourself approach.  What makes sense for you at this point?
  4. Identify 5 people to spend time with to move you in the direction you want to go.  Parish commented that we are an average of the 15 people we spend time with.  Who do you want to be with and who do you want to be?  Choices begin with the people with whom you surround yourself.

Need ideas to get you started?  Take a look at TedTalks: Under 30, Doing Good and Yes!’s People We Love.

Need encouragement? Start Close In.  One step at a time, while looking forward.  You are in good company!

~Holly

Doing Good, Doing Well: Make Money Doing What You Love

Posted on November 10, 2011 with No Comments

Meaning making & making money?

Are they mutually exclusive or is it possible to do both?  Yes!

Here are the steps:

  • Define what matters to you
  • Explore opportunities
  • Learn from others
  • Take a stand, take a step – get involved!

Soul Collage

Find out what is possible:

Considering a Non-Profit Career

Learn from the experts:

Idealist.org

Get in the conversation:

Join LinkedIn & their non-profit groups, including:

Non Profit & Philanthropic Job Board
Non Profit Network
Non Profit Professionals
UVM Career Connections: Non Profit & Social Services

Clarify your Mission:

Friday, Nov. 11, 1:30 pm: Creating a Personal Mission Statement & Action Plan,
Career Services L/L E 166.

Get Involved:

UVM is a great place to start

Do a year of service:

Non-Profit Fellowships

~Holly

What is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life?

Posted on June 3, 2011 with No Comments

Check out this recent article, “It’s Not About You.” by New York Times columnist David Brooks.  He discusses the problem of making a career or life decision amongst “limitless possibilities.”

The answer articulated in this article is not to focus on ourselves, but rather to engage with our communities and finds issues and problems that we want to commit our energies to. He writes, “Most of us are egotistical and most are self-concerned most of the time, but it’s nonetheless true that life comes to a point only in those moments when the self dissolves into some task. The purpose in life is not to find yourself. It’s to lose yourself.”

So, how do you find something to commit yourself to, “to lose yourself” in?

Click here for more.

World of Work: Allie Tompkins ‘10, National Prison Project Intern for the ACLU Foundation

Posted on April 25, 2011 with No Comments

Allie Tompkins '10

Allie Tompkins ‘10

National Prison Project Intern for the ACLU Foundation

Washington, DC

Major: Political Science/Global Studies

How would you describe what you do on a typical day?

As an intern, I come into the office 5 days a week for a half day. I answer letters from inmates writing the prison project for assistance, and I work with a paralegal to do research on policy and prison programs for the attorneys on staff at the National Prison Project.

What advice do you have for students searching for jobs or internships in your field?

Look for the jobs that really speak to what you are interested in. I applied to a ton of internships, but the two places I received offers from were the places I was most passionate about working at. I think this really stood out on my cover letter and during my interviews.

What motivates you to go to work every day for this organization?

Even though I’m an unpaid intern, I’m motivated to go to work every day because the ACLU puts into action what I was most passionate about learning at UVM, Constiutional Law. In our project, we represent prisoners and provide them with information. I think this is important because they are a truly underrepresented part of society and it requires a lot of viligance to make sure that their rights are being upheld in prison.

How did your time at UVM, both in and out of the classroom, prepare you for your position?

At UVM I became really interested in Constitutional Law, and the ACLU is one of the best places to gain experience in this field. During my interview the attorney I spoke with was very happy that I knew a lot about the federal courts appointment process, something that we spent a lot of time on in my Political Science senior seminar. Outside of the classroom at UVM, meeting so many critical thinkers and people who are willing to question the status quo and ask important questions has really influenced the way that I understand what I do at my internship and how I interact with the other people at my job.

What was your childhood dream job?

My childhood dream job was a Marine Biologist (wasn’t that everyone’s dream job at some point?), somewhere along the way I also wanted to be a doctor.

If you’re interested in seeing all our World of Work profiles, click here. If you are a UVM alumnus and would like to be featured, please contact us at career.services@uvm.edu. If you are interested in contacting a featured alum, check out the Career Connection alumni database or contact us.

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