Posts Tagged new york

World of Work: Nydia E. Guity ’09, Fordham Tremont Community Mental Health Center

Posted on February 12, 2014 with No Comments

Nydia Guity headshotNydia E. Guity ‘09
Mental Health Clinician
Fordham-Tremont Community Mental Health Center at Saint Barnabas Hospital
New York City
Major: Social Work
Graduate Program: Fordham University – Master of Social Work

How would you describe what you do on a typical day?

I service clients for individual, family, and group therapy sessions. Topics range from how to manage depressive / anxiety symptoms to how to build and maintain healthy daily routines.

Tell us about your path to this position.

I am a mental health clinician in an outpatient clinic. At this time my goal is to obtain the License in Clinical Social Work (LCSW) and start a private practice. During my time at UVM, I did not expect that I would pursue a career in social work. My plan at the time was to go back to school for a Masters in Nursing.

How did your time at UVM, both in and out of the classroom, prepare you for your position?

My time at UVM helped me become aware that social work is more than just helping people.  I learned how to work with resistance and focus on strengths in order to progress in treatment.

What advice do you have for students searching for jobs or internships in your field?

My advice would be to be open minded to different settings and open to learning from every experience in the field.

What was your childhood dream job?

My dream job as a child was to be a hair stylist. I always loved helping people and encouraging them to look their best. When you look good you often feel good!

Begin Networking with Two Easy Steps

Posted on December 5, 2013 with No Comments

Network of diverse peoples

Love it or hate it: Networking is an integral part of any job search, but it doesn’t have to be daunting.

You have likely heard some of the reasons why you should network. The relationships you build connect you to information, organizations, and people- all that may help you direct your next steps. Plus, networking is often the key to unlocking the hidden job market – those jobs and internships that are never publicly posted.

Even amongst all the reasons to network, it can be difficult to get started. Here are two easy steps you can take this winter break:

  • Hold an informational interview. These are short 20-30 minute interviews that you set up to learn from other professionals about their career path, industry, or company. There is not necessarily a job or internship available rather these interviews provide starting points for building professional relationships.

    Try to start with someone you know – a family friend, older sibling of a friend, or reach out to UVM alumnus in your area. Bring questions and an eagerness to learn.

  • Attend a networking event. These events are set up specifically for building networks amongst professionals. Here you can have numerous conversations in one evening and develop those relationships outside of the event.

    This winter break, UVM is hosting networking events in Boston (Jan. 6) and New York (Jan. 8). These events are designed to connect students and UVM alumni in those regions.

Read more about setting up informational interviews and preparing for networking events.

~Lisa

World of Work: Allie Schwartz ’11, LinkedIn

Posted on October 22, 2013 with No Comments

Allie SchwartzAllie Schwartz ‘11
Relationship Management Specialist
LinkedIn
New York, NY
Major: Community Entrepreneurship
www.linkedin.com/in/allieschwartz

How would you describe what you do on a typical day?

I build and maintain relationships with our clients. I help ensure our clients see success from our tools and I am constantly in contact with them. I support a team of six relationship managers and all of their accounts. We collaborate to create a strategic plan for their accounts.

Tell us about your path to this position.

If you told me during senior year of college that I would be working at LinkedIn a year after graduation, I would have called you crazy. I spent every summer in college interning to find out what I was interested in. I learned a lot about the corporate world and myself. Through that experience I started to figure out what I liked and didn’t like and what skills came naturally and the ones I needed to work on.

During my senior year, I really started to think about what I wanted to do and who I wanted to be. I knew I wanted to be in the marketing/sales industry, but that was vague. After graduation, I spent three months networking with everyone and anyone to pinpoint what I wanted. In September of 2011, I landed a job at a small digital video branding agency. Because it was so small, I took on a lot of responsibilities and learned a lot.

After nine months, I was recruited by someone at LinkedIn. I never expected to be recruited for a role, I only knew myself as an active candidate. Since starting at LinkedIn, I haven’t stopped learning. Every day there is something new to discover. For me, the learning curve hasn’t stopped. I continuously try to find new ways to learn.

What advice do you have for students searching for jobs or internships in your field?

Three words: network, network, network. That word was said more times in my house than any other word, both throughout my college years and to this day. From the beginning of my college career, my dad encouraged me to connect with different people in all different roles. After meeting with just one person, I would have a list of 3-5 other people to connect with. Each of those people would have a list of people for me to connect with. It was a domino effect. Just because someone isn’t at the company you want to be at, doesn’t mean they don’t know someone who is. You never know who you’re going to meet and who they happen to know. Networking isn’t just about getting a job; networking can help you with becoming a member of a board, getting a new client, a recommendation, grad school and much more.

How did your time at UVM, both in and out of the classroom, prepare you for your position?

My time at UVM prepared me for this position in more ways than I can imagine. In the classroom, a lot of my classes required group projects. In my current role, while I make my own calls, we all collaborate together on tips and strategies, emails that work and that don’t work, we even help each other make calls. Outside of the classroom, it was meeting so many different people. The majority of my friends are from the New England area and all come from different backgrounds. They all have taught me different things and honestly, made my four years at UVM amazing. There isn’t a day that goes by that I don’t reference someone from UVM in some sort of way.

Networking Nights: A Student Perspective

Posted on March 28, 2013 with No Comments

“Our success has really been based on partnerships from the very beginning.”
-Bill Gates

Networking seated event with speaker

Networkers posing for picture

As a senior at UVM, I had finally approached the time where I had to start researching and applying for jobs. I had held various internships and other working positions, but now I had to start seriously thinking about entering the real world.  For the past 3 years, I received various emails and flyers about UVM’s Boston and New York Networking Events which were held over Winter Break. I had secretly avoided them in the past due to anxiety, and stress of networking with complete strangers. To prepare for this event, last semester I attended a workshop on networking, and gained more confidence in this skill. Once the event date arrived, I drove into Boston to start networking.

UVM alum, and CEO of British Beer Company, Mike Fallman, was the keynote speaker. He provided students and alumni with his version of “the most important interview tips,” where he stressed the significance of networking.  Both events paralleled the idea of speed dating. Students rotated between tables and conversed on various topics with alums. With a set amount of time and alternating among tables, networking was far less stressful than anticipated. Discussions were relaxed yet helpful, and alum talked about their career path, networking, and provided us with interviewing and job searching tips.

After the speed networking portion, we were able to individually meet alums who work in industries of our personal interest. The small room was completely packed with alumni and students networking, and exchanging contact information. Overall, the Boston Networking Event was a huge success. It was great to meet the keynote speaker, and hear from other UVM alums about their experience. This year more than 280 UVM alumni and current students gathered in Boston and New York to network, with more to come in Vermont and Washington D.C. I would highly recommend attending one of these Networking Events. I’ve certainly learned that it’s never too late to start networking.

~Tashia, Career Peer Advisor

Internship of the Month: Simon and Schuster

Posted on October 6, 2011 with No Comments

Beryl Frishtick

Intern: Beryl Frishtick
Class Year: 2013
Major: English
Internship Title: Editorial Intern (at the Atria and Emily Bestler Books imprints)
Company: Simon & Schuster
Website: http://www.simonandschuster.com/

Briefly tell us about the organization you were with:  Simon & Schuster is a world-renowned publishing company with offices in NYC, London, Australia, and India.  I worked in the NYC headquarters near 30 Rock.  S&S publishes all types of books, including adult fiction, memoir, celebrity authors, young adult novels, children’s books, and of course e-books.

How would you describe the various projects you did for your organization to someone who is unfamiliar with your field? I mainly worked on three types of projects.  The first was to read manuscript submissions and either write rejection letters or pass them up the food chain to my supervisors if I really liked them.  The second project was writing flap copy, which is the text you find on the back of a book that gives you a taste of the plot.  The third was actually editing books, going through them line by line and looking for grammar mistakes and plot inaccuracies.

What did you like best about this internship? What was most challenging? The best part of my internship was definitely editing novels, because I had the chance to go through the manuscript on my own then sit down with Emily Bestler, the senior editor, and go through both our copies page by page.

The most challenging part about the internship was writing rejection letters, because when I first started I was hesitant and didn’t feel comfortable with that sort of power.  But as I learned more and more about the publishing industry, I felt better able to craft rejection letters and I worked to include as much constructive criticism as possible.

How did you gain credit for this internship? I enrolled in Mary Beth Barritt’s EDSS course to receive one credit, since Simon & Schuster mandates that their interns receive credit in order to work there but I did not actually need the credit to graduate.

What impact did this internship have on your career direction? Because of my hands-on experience this summer with Simon & Schuster, I am definitely considering going into the publishing industry.

What advice do you have for students searching for internships? Try to find contacts at companies you wish to work for.  Nine times out of ten that is how people find jobs, by knowing someone.  It’s frustrating but it’s true.

Why should students do an internship? Interning, especially away from your home or college town, makes you a more responsible person.  It’s great practice for future careers, and it’s also a lot of fun.

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