Posts Tagged Internships

Now What?

Posted on March 20, 2014 with No Comments

Stones aligned to form tiny footprintsThe UVM Job Fairs are over for this academic year. Whether you attended the fair or not, here are your next steps on the journey to gain career experience:

If you attended the fair:

  • Send a simple email thank you to employers you met.
  • Assess what you learned about your interests and skills and what employers are looking for to set a direction for your next steps. Identify your priorities and a list of organizations you want to pursue.
  • Complete the Job Fair survey on Catamount Job Link to assist the Career Center’s plans for next year’s events.

If you missed the fair:

  • Opportunities to gain career experience are on-going!  Use job search information to assess where you are and the resources available.
  • Search Catamount Job Link and other job/internship databases to identify options.
  • Connect, connect, connect!  Use your networks and explore professional associations to learn more.  The Vermont Alumni Networking Event is April 9th and the DC Alumni Networking is June 5th.

Keep the conversations going!  Delve into your field of interest. Be bold and take tangible steps toward your goals.

~Holly

Top 5 Reasons To Attend the Spring Job Fair

Posted on March 13, 2014 with No Comments

Find Job key on keyboard

  1. Bigger is Better! This is the biggest Job Fair in UVM’s history124 organizations are coming to campus to meet YOU.  It is the closest you will get to someone knocking on your door with an opportunity!  Come talk to people who are hiring and learn about their work culture and opportunities.
  2. Now IS the Right Time: You don’t need to be a graduating senior to come to the fair!  Come now! Wherever you are in your studies, learn about what is out there and what employers are looking for in top candidates.
  3. Find Hidden Jobs 80% of jobs aren’t publically advertised. How can you find them?  You talk with people!  People are coming to campus hoping to meet good applicants for jobs and internships.  Don’t disappoint them!
  4. Practice! Nervous about talking with employers?  The best way to be less nervous is to practice, practice, practice. Each time you introduce yourself and ask a question, you’ll get more comfortable and relaxed.
  5. Smile! Need a professional photo for your LinkedIn profile? We will be taking photos and emailing them to you.  Make sure your presentation on LinkedIn is professional as you use it to network with people in your fields of interest.

See you at the Spring Job Fair on Wednesday, March 19, 2-5pm.
Davis Center, 4th Floor.

~Holly & Jill

What Characterizes a Good Internship?

Posted on January 23, 2014 with No Comments

Two kinds of internships; one with collaboration and learning, another of simply filling coffee orders

Photo: An example of a good internship (where there is communication and feedback), and an example of a less-than-good internship (repetitive tasks that aren’t related to career goals)

At this time of year, many students are applying for summer internships at a variety of different companies and organizations. With so many internship postings out there, how can you find one that provides a quality experience?

Whether paid or unpaid, or if you’re earning academic credit or not, there are several qualities that characterize an effective internship:

  • Your internship has direct relevance to your career interests and goals. It also provides opportunities for learning skills and knowledge that can transfer to other work environments.
  • The internship takes place in a supervised environment. The intern has the opportunity to ask questions, as well as receive training and feedback.
  • There is clear communication, and expectations for both the intern and the internship site are clear.
  • Optimally, interns are given the opportunity to see the “big picture” of how the organization operates. This might happen through meetings, events, and resources provided by the internship supervisor.

In contrast, what makes for a less-than-good internship experience, and should you avoid?

  • Repetitive, menial tasks that don’t relate to your career interests and goals. We hear jokes about interns whose sole tasks are to deliver coffee and make copies, but that obviously doesn’t create a valuable experience. As a side-note, we all end up making coffee and copies once in a while – but those shouldn’t be your main responsibilities.
  • Commission-based work (that is, being paid based on sales). As an intern, you are new to the company and are just learning about the organization and how it works. It isn’t fair to put you in a position of pitching products that you don’t know much about, and it likely won’t connect to your career goals.
  • Paying for an internship. In specific circumstances, it might make sense to pay for a comprehensive program (interning abroad is one example, when your money goes towards housing and travel), but be wary of any company that asks you to hand over money for the opportunity to intern.

A quick Google search can bring up a lot of information about former interns’ experiences, as well as more information about a specific company. Do your research before applying, especially if an opportunity sounds sketchy or too good to be true.

Still looking for more resources? Come for the Internships 101 workshop, every Tuesday at 4:15 in the Career + Experience Hub, or stop by our Drop In Hours at the hub Hub, Monday – Thursday 1-4, or Friday 1-3pm.

~Amanda

Introducing the Anna Whitcomb Internship Scholarship!

Posted on December 13, 2013 with No Comments

Three Women Laying Soil

Exciting news! The UVM Career Center is happy to announce the Anna Whitcomb Internship Scholarship, a competitive award that will provide financial assistance to several UVM students so that they may each be able to accept an unpaid internship opportunity.

Internships allow students to gain on-the-job experience and attain valuable skills that can launch them into a chosen career. It’s important for jobseekers to have internship experience under their belts so that they can stand out among the competition. The tricky part about all of this is that internships aren’t always available and accessible to everyone – students may struggle to take unpaid opportunities, or need to take on an additional part-time job to make ends meet. The Anna Whitcomb Internship Scholarship will begin to address these barriers and provide funds for several students to help bridge the financial gap.

The scholarship is open to all students, but preference will be given to those pursuing internships that promote the common good at mission-based or non-profit organizations.

Four scholarships will be awarded, and there will be two different application periods to accommodate the varying timelines in which employers select students for internships.

  • The deadline for the first application period is February 15
  • The deadline for the second application period is March 15

You do not need to have a confirmed internship to apply, and can list up to two organizations/companies where you have applied for an internship.

The application requirements and materials will be announced when spring classes begin. In the meantime, take advantage of downtime during the winter break to start looking for that internship! Ask around with friends, family, and faculty for leads, and consider attending a networking event with UVM alumni in New York City or Boston.

Check out these other resources for getting started:

UVM Career Center Internship Page
Catamount Job Link
8 Reasons to Pursue an Internship

The Career Center is still open during the break – if you have questions, send us an email or call us to set up a phone appointment!

career@uvm.edu
802-656-3450

The Single Most Important Thing To Do After the Job Fair

Posted on October 31, 2013 with No Comments

Thank you note

Write a thank you note.

Why? A prompt and sincere note of thanks helps you stand out among the hundreds of other people the employer met at the fair. It demonstrates that you’re sincerely interested and motivated about their company, it demonstrates your writing skills and it can make you more memorable than any other candidate.

Here are 5 tips to making your thank you note successful:

    1. Make it professional.

This isn’t a text message or a Facebook post with your friends, so don’t use slang or abbreviations. Address the email formally with “Dear Ms. Hoppenjans” instead of “Hi Jill!” Sign it with “Sincerely” instead of “TTYL.” Remember that this could be your future employer.

    2. Make it grammatically perfect.

Re-read your note several times to make sure it is as perfect as a resume or cover letter. You want the employer to remember you and what you’ve said, not that you misspelled the company’s name!

    3. Make it personal.

You don’t have to send a note to every person you met. Send notes to employers you are really interested in and/or want to stay connected to. Don’t send a mass email to many employers at once. Write an individualized email and try to incorporate the conversation you had with the employer, particularly if there is something about the conversation that might be memorable for the employer.

    4. Make it meaningful.

At a minimum, you are thanking them for attending the fair and for speaking with you. If the employer gave you some next steps (i.e.: apply online, look at their website, talk with another colleague), give them an update on your progress. If you don’t have more to say, don’t add fluff or filler.

    5. Make it easy for the employer.

Attach a copy of your resume so that the employer can be quickly reminded of who you are.

~Jill

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