Posts Tagged Internships

The Home Stretch

Posted on December 4, 2014 with No Comments

Finish Line Ahead

As you begin finals, we want to wish you good luck in the last days of the fall semester. Between study sessions, you might also start to think about how to use the upcoming break to your full advantage.

During the semester you may have felt too busy to begin delving into career exploration or preparation, but the month-long break is a great time to:

  • Refine your resume
  • Research and apply to job or internship opportunities
  • Contact a UVM grad for a job shadow or informational interview
  • Create or refine your LinkedIn profile
  • Clean up your social media presence
  • Schedule an appointment with a career counselor to talk about your 4 Year Plan and career goals

Remember that the Career Center is open for most of winter break, and phone appointments are available for those outside of the Burlington area.

So best of luck with your finals, enjoy your break, and use the time to catch up!

~Amanda

The Party’s Not Over Yet! Here’s How to Stand Out AFTER the Job Fair.

Posted on October 21, 2014 with No Comments

Staff of City Year Corps Members

Vilma Rodrigues-Silva is the Recruitment Manager of the Northeast Region for City Year New Hampshire. She goes to lots of job fairs, so we asked her about the best ways for candidates to stand out after the event.

Is there an appropriate way to follow up with an employer after a Job Fair, even if I didn’t get a chance to meet you there?

YES! Following up with an email is fine if you missed us at a fair or could not make it. You do not need to be shy about letting a recruiter know that you are interested in a program (that is what we are here for!), and there is no need to explain in detail about why you didn’t make it to the fair. Following up with an email shows us that you are taking the initiative to learn more about our program, and that is a good thing.

What do you think about thank you notes after a Job Fair?

Personalized, hand-written notes are amazing! However, if I received these from even half of all of the students I met at job fairs, I would have hundreds of them coming in and I wouldn’t be able to keep up. I believe handwritten notes should be left to more personal interactions or after an interview. All other instances of meeting at fairs or presentations could be followed up with an email note, thanking the recruiter for their time and for coming to campus. What makes a good note is simply saying thank you and mentioning something specific that you learned or that the recruiter said that stuck with you.

Is it possible to follow up too much?

Yes, there is a “too much policy.”  It’s important to show recruiters that you are interested in their program, but keep in mind that there is an abundance of information on the websites and brochures. You don’t want to ask a recruiter something that could simply be found on the homepage of a website. However, if you need clarification on something you’ve read, want more information on something you found, or want a personal account of the recruiter’s experience, then feel free to call and email.

What else should candidates know?

I – and many recruiters – love talking to students at fairs! If you already know a little about a program and plan on visiting the fair, you should come prepared to ask questions to gain more knowledge. If you randomly end up at a table because it caught your attention, politely introduce yourself and ask to learn more! Don’t be afraid to inquire for more information, and to tell the recruiter a little about yourself. Show confidence!

Job Fair Insights from the Other Side of the Table

Posted on October 16, 2014 with No Comments

Build Your IT Career at Fast

Here’s the inside scoop from a recruiter who attends A LOT of job fairs!

What can students do to stand out (in a good way) at a Job Fair?

One of the first questions we ask a candidate at a career fair is, “have you heard of Fast Enterprises?” Students should find the companies and opportunities that they are interested in ahead of time and check out their website & social media. Doing research shows that you are interested in and excited about the opportunity to work at a company.

What do recruiters like best about attending a Job Fair?

We love to meet candidates face to face! This is a candidate’s chance to explain their qualifications to us, rather than us simply viewing their resume on a computer. Tell us about you, what you are looking for and what you can bring to our team. Make a great first impression.

What do recruiters like least about attending a Job Fair?

Because FAST is a smaller company, not many students have heard of us and don’t stop by our booth to learn about us. Instead, they stand in line at the large companies that they are familiar with. We recommend considering the smaller or unfamiliar companies. Just because you haven’t heard of the company before does not mean that they do not have great opportunities available! Be flexible at a career fair and open to all job prospects.

Why should first-years and sophomores attend a Job Fair?

Career fairs can seem intimidating, but attending during your freshman and sophomore years is advantageous. It will help you practice your networking skills and it shows employers that you are motivated, and a go-getter. We love sharing the FAST stories with all candidates and we even give tips to younger students about how they can become a better candidate for FAST in the upcoming years.

~Gina Somsen
Recruiter, Fast Enterprises, LLC

Talk with Fast Representatives Sarah Berry and Chris Schmidt (& 125 other employers!) at the Fall Job Fair on October 22, 2014. 2-6pm. Davis Center

Internships vs. Research

Posted on September 25, 2014 with No Comments

Intern and Researcher Collage

The line between an internship and research can sometimes be gray.

Internships and research are both valuable experiences that can build your resume, and students often ask about the differences between these two options.

Both research and internships are supervised experiences that allow you to gain knowledge, skills, and abilities in a particular field. Each offers the opportunity for reflection and evaluation of the information learned. These experiences will allow you to build your resume, explore your interests, and build connections that may be important for your future career. They can also help you develop “soft” skills, like critical thinking and problem solving, flexibility of mind, as well as allowing you to gain “hard” skills, such as grant writing, using databases, manuscript creation, using GIS, or printmaking.

Here’s where they differ:

An internship is experiential learning that combines classroom learning with work in a professional setting. Internships:

  • Are career-related work experience
  • Can be in nearly any field
  • Apply classroom theory to real world applications
  • Allow you to learn career related skills
  • Can be a chance to “try out” at a company or organization, which may decide to hire you after graduation

In contrast, The Council on Undergraduate Research defines research as, “An inquiry or investigation conducted by an undergraduate student that makes an original intellectual or creative contribution to the discipline (www.cur.org)”. Research:

  • Allows a student to be involved in the planning, conducting, and (ideally) reporting of a research project that leads to the creation of original knowledge in the discipline
  • Can happen in any academic field
  • Can be good training for graduate or medical school, getting your first job or the one after that
  • May allow you to publish a paper, have your own art show, or write a thesis
  • Can let you strengthen connections with faculty mentor (which may also lead to a letter of recommendation)

Interested in learning more? Come to the Internship Hop on October 8 from 1:30-4pm to hear about both research and internship opportunities. You can also check out the internship page on our website, or take a look at the website for the Office of Undergraduate Research.

~Amanda

Join Us at the Career + Experience Hub

Posted on September 11, 2014 with No Comments

Career + Experience Hub logo

As our one-year anniversary approaches in October, we reflect on the past year and smile because it was a successful year with visits from various students. Yet as the academic year commences, there are still some students who hesitantly come into the space and ask, “What exactly is the Hub?” To help those who are asking themselves this question, below is a snapshot of what the Hub is and the services we provide.

What is the C+E Hub?

The C+E Hub is a centralized space in the Davis Center where eight experiential learning offices at UVM including; Leadership & Civic Engagement, Office of International Education, Food Systems Internship, Career Center, Student Employment Office, Office of Fellowship Advising, Office of Undergraduate Research, and Office of Community-University Partnership Service Learning, have created a partnership to help students “get started” with experiential opportunities that excite them. Our goal is to promote the 4 Year Plan to all students and send the message that it’s never too early for you to find experiences outside of the classroom. In the end, these experiences will assist with the development of various transferable skills and interests that will be marketable to employers once you leave UVM.

What are the services?

Our partner offices and the Career Center’s Career Peer Mentors are trained to assist students with general questions pertaining to the eight offices. We have career counselors and partner staff available during our Drop-In hours throughout the week to answer students questions such as how to find a job or internship, research, service learning, study abroad, fellowships, or how you can get involved on campus. Last but not least, we hold numerous workshops and events throughout the year that tie into each of those topics.

We hope you will stop by and get started on your next steps and 4 Year Plan for Career Success!

~Danielle

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