Posts Tagged career connection

Savvy Seniors: What’s Your Plan?

Posted on April 12, 2012 with No Comments

Stepping Stones

Commencement is just six weeks away!  If you don’t already know what you are doing and how to get there, here are some tips and advice to get you going.


Not Sure what you Want to Do?
You’re not alone!

  • Assess and Prioritize

What can you do today to prepare for tomorrow?

Take one small step towards your goals!

More Great Advice!
100 Blog Posts Every College Senior Should Read
Quint Careers: Job Search Advice for College Seniors: Job Hunting in Times of Uncertainty
Linked In Founder Shares Advice: Take Intelligent Risks
6 Tips for Success all College Seniors Should Know

~Kala

Networking for Beginners

Posted on April 5, 2012 with No Comments

Networking Event

Why should I network? How should I network? How should I prepare for a networking event? If you are currently battling with the job- or internship-search process, it is probable that you have asked yourself at least one of these questions.

Being a student, I find it difficult to prepare for networking events. Without a general push in the right direction, it could be tough to find the motivation to network, so I asked and answered the following questions to get started:

Why should I network?

Networking is a great way to build connections and opportunities. With the job market being as competitive as it is, general career and industry-specific advice from professionals can make all the difference.

How should I network?

  1. Identify opportunities to grow your network such as UVM’s Vermont Career Networking Night, the Vermont Young Professionals, or other networking events.
  2. LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter are great ways of social networking as well.  Research and follow your preferred employer to keep updated on new trends and events.
  3. On LinkedIn, join professional groups or alumni groups such as University of Vermont Career Connection and University of Vermont Alumni.

How should I prepare for a networking event?

  1. Research the networkers. Look them up on LinkedIn to learn about their career paths.
  2. Research the companies represented at the event.
  3. Come prepared with questions for the networkers.
  4. Make business cards or build your resume. Both of these are great ways to get noticed.

This should get you started!

~Randall, Career Peer Advisor

Job Fair Follow-Up: Insights from an Employer

Posted on March 27, 2012 with No Comments

Randy Blender of Enterprise Holdings

Organization: Enterprise Holdings
Representative: Randi Blender, Talent Acquisition Manager

The Job Fair is over! What do you suggest that students do to follow up?

When I meet someone at the Job Fair, it’s always nice to receive a thank you and see his/her online application.

If a student secures an interview from the Job Fair, what should they do to prepare?

Learn as much as you can about the company, explore their website, connect via LinkedIn to learn more. Get prepared to interview: ensure you have a suit or appropriate outfit and transportation, practice answering interview question and build your confidence. Think, what kind of person does the company want to hire and what are your strengths, why should someone hire you?

What if a student wasn’t able to attend the Job Fair or didn’t connect with a particular recruiter?

Get the list of employers and reach out to employers. From my perspective, if someone didn’t make it and had interest I would think he/she would call or email me, apologizing for missing the fair and express interest in learning more about the opportunity and how to get started with applying.

What do you recommend that students do next to find jobs and explore careers?

Do informational interviews and be prepared with questions. Think of friends’ parents, your own mentors, coaches, and professors. Ask them about job searching and how they landed where they are.  Call a staffing agency, ask them questions about the job market, and ask for a referral. Search Linked In and seek out connections and learn more about career paths and companies.

World of Work: Scott Whitted ’74, Deputy Chief, District Court Litigation Division, U.S. Department of Homeland Security

Posted on February 2, 2012 with No Comments

Homeland Security Logo

Scott Whitted ’74
Deputy Chief, District Court Litigation Division, Office of the Principal Legal Advisor, Immigration and Customs Enforcement
United States Government, Department of Homeland Security, Immigration and Customs Enforcement
http://www.ice.gov/index.htm
Williston, VT

Major: Political Science

What type of law do you practice and how did you choose that?
I’ve practiced civil law for my entire career, including private practice, with the Vermont Attorney General’s Office and now at one of the agencies in the Department of Homeland Security. I’ve never been a full-time litigator, but before I started my federal job I spent some time in court, especially when I was in the Attorney General’s office. Although criminal law and criminal procedure were interesting classes in law school, I never wanted to practice criminal law. Civil law held more appeal for me.

What surprised you about law school and/or the practice of law?
One big surprise was how poorly many lawyers write. The textbooks for most law school courses are compilations of judges’ decisions that often are not well written. They tend to be too long and full of obscure language. Law students copy the style, which perpetuates bad writing. In addition, practicing law can be a real grind, with much tedium and little glamour. There are rarely quick resolutions to legal problems.

What changes have you seen in the legal job market?
With the current economy, the competition for jobs is heightened. It’s a buyer’s market right now. My office recently advertised for four openings and we received dozens of applications.

What advice would you have for students interested in a career in law?  What should they be doing now?
Take college classes that encourage you to think critically and analytically. Those skills will help you to identify problems (“issue spotting”) and develop realistic solutions, which are important aspects of a lawyer’s job. Also, learn to write clearly and concisely. Lawyers do a lot of writing, and unfortunately many lawyers do not write well.

In addition, don’t be afraid to work for a few years before you go to law school. Not only may you be able to save some money toward law school, but you’ll have the benefit of experience in the “real world” before you return to academia. Admittedly, I may be partial to this approach because I worked for five years between UVM and law school.

Savvy Seniors: Polish your Resume and Professional Presentation

Posted on December 1, 2011 with No Comments

Mile 21

Many marathoners will agree that mile 21 is a tough one. You’ve come so far, yet you still have a ways to go. You are almost finished with your college career, almost but not quite.

Where do you find the energy to push through until the end? To sit down and polish your resume, create a professional Linked-In profile, attend networking events, make professional connections and apply and interview for jobs? Not to mention, homework and tests.

Whew! Just reading through the list could make you tired.

Let us consider advice from the Marathon pros to help you finish the year strong!
• Pace yourself: This isn’t a quick sprint. Keep taking steady, sustainable steps forward
• Take care of yourself throughout the process: rest and good food are your friends
• Pay attention to your mind-set and self-talk: success is mainly in the mind
• Set reasonable outcome and process goals: think of things you can easily achieve, as well as ultimate goals

To help you keep moving forward and meeting your goals, step-by-step, the focus this month is on Resumes and your Professional Presentation.

Check out the resources on the Senior Checklist for Career Success to create or improve your resume and create a professional Linked In Profile.

The keystone of your job search is your resume. You will need it to network and job search effectively. If you don’t have one yet, now’s the time!

If you already have a fabulous resume, please consider your on-line presence. Are you Linked-In? Have you checked your Facebook Privacy settings? Have you Googled yourself lately? Now is the time to create a positive, professional on-line presence.

Ryan Hall, on running a marathon:
“I don’t think about the miles that are coming down the road, I don’t think about the mile I’m on right now, I don’t think about the miles I’ve already covered. I think about what I’m doing right now, just being lost in the moment.”

You’re entering the home stretch.
Wishing you well!

~Kala

Marathon Comic

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