Posts Tagged alumni

World of Work: Allie Schwartz ’11, LinkedIn

Posted on October 22, 2013 with No Comments

Allie SchwartzAllie Schwartz ‘11
Relationship Management Specialist
LinkedIn
New York, NY
Major: Community Entrepreneurship
www.linkedin.com/in/allieschwartz

How would you describe what you do on a typical day?

I build and maintain relationships with our clients. I help ensure our clients see success from our tools and I am constantly in contact with them. I support a team of six relationship managers and all of their accounts. We collaborate to create a strategic plan for their accounts.

Tell us about your path to this position.

If you told me during senior year of college that I would be working at LinkedIn a year after graduation, I would have called you crazy. I spent every summer in college interning to find out what I was interested in. I learned a lot about the corporate world and myself. Through that experience I started to figure out what I liked and didn’t like and what skills came naturally and the ones I needed to work on.

During my senior year, I really started to think about what I wanted to do and who I wanted to be. I knew I wanted to be in the marketing/sales industry, but that was vague. After graduation, I spent three months networking with everyone and anyone to pinpoint what I wanted. In September of 2011, I landed a job at a small digital video branding agency. Because it was so small, I took on a lot of responsibilities and learned a lot.

After nine months, I was recruited by someone at LinkedIn. I never expected to be recruited for a role, I only knew myself as an active candidate. Since starting at LinkedIn, I haven’t stopped learning. Every day there is something new to discover. For me, the learning curve hasn’t stopped. I continuously try to find new ways to learn.

What advice do you have for students searching for jobs or internships in your field?

Three words: network, network, network. That word was said more times in my house than any other word, both throughout my college years and to this day. From the beginning of my college career, my dad encouraged me to connect with different people in all different roles. After meeting with just one person, I would have a list of 3-5 other people to connect with. Each of those people would have a list of people for me to connect with. It was a domino effect. Just because someone isn’t at the company you want to be at, doesn’t mean they don’t know someone who is. You never know who you’re going to meet and who they happen to know. Networking isn’t just about getting a job; networking can help you with becoming a member of a board, getting a new client, a recommendation, grad school and much more.

How did your time at UVM, both in and out of the classroom, prepare you for your position?

My time at UVM prepared me for this position in more ways than I can imagine. In the classroom, a lot of my classes required group projects. In my current role, while I make my own calls, we all collaborate together on tips and strategies, emails that work and that don’t work, we even help each other make calls. Outside of the classroom, it was meeting so many different people. The majority of my friends are from the New England area and all come from different backgrounds. They all have taught me different things and honestly, made my four years at UVM amazing. There isn’t a day that goes by that I don’t reference someone from UVM in some sort of way.

World of Work: Maya Thomas ’11, GIS Specialist, Civil Solutions

Posted on September 19, 2013 with No Comments

Maya Thomas

Maya Thomas ‘11
GIS Specialist
Civil Solutions, a division of ARH Engineering
Hammonton, NJ
Major: Environmental Science (RSENR)

How would you describe what you do on a typical day?

I work with spatial data and create maps – lots of maps. Most of our clients are local governments (counties and municipalities) and we provide mapping services for them. For example, we take data from tax maps and convert it to digital data so clients can look at it on the fly on our web service or on their own GIS software.

What motivates you to go to work everyday?

I really love GIS! I love seeing the things I map everyday. I drive on the roads I add to my road maps, I pass by the buildings I digitize, and I learn about new municipalities in New Jersey every day.

What advice do you have for students searching for jobs or internships in your field?
Work on as many GIS projects as you can in your coursework. Incorporate it into your research and internships. Connect with your faculty to find out about internships. From what I’ve seen, certification (different from certificates!) is important in this field. Whether a certification is from GISCI, Esri, ASPRS, or other organizations, start thinking about ways to prepare for those exams or applications. And, of course, network! Both my full-time jobs after college were gained from building connections. 

Describe your best day at work.

My best day at work is when I have tons of different projects to do. Mapping out a survey site for colleagues here, creating road maps there, updating parcels over here, and maintaining the web mapping service over there. The day goes by quickly and I feel so accomplished by the end of the day!

Savvy Seniors: Parting Words

Posted on May 9, 2013 with No Comments

UVM Graduation Ceremony

As you prepare to graduate from UVM, you are probably awash with information and advice. This article from US News Money boils it down to what you really need to know: Tough Love Tips for College Seniors Entering the Job Market

The highlights?

Good news! Employers report they expect to hire 13% more new grads than last year!

Reality check: You are still most likely going to need to work hard to land that first professional position.

Overall message: Own your job search process. It’s yours. The resources are here to support you, but you have to manage your time, seek out support and take concrete steps to achieve your goals.

More good news! As a UVM graduate you are now part of a large community of UVM alumni who connect with and support each other. Be sure to create a profile on LinkedIn and join professional groups such as the University of Vermont Career Connection and the UVM Alumni Association. Start building your connections through networking and informational interviewing.

It’s never too late to start where you are. So take a deep breath, stay calm, and take that next step!

Looking for more advice and tips? Read past Savvy Seniors blog posts.

Best wishes class of 2013!

~Kala

World of Work: Ali Peterson ‘07, Shakespeare Theatre Company

Posted on April 25, 2013 with No Comments

Ali Peterson'Ali Peterson ‘07
Corporate Giving Manager
Shakespeare Theatre Company – www.shakespearetheatre.org
Washington, D.C.
Major: Zoology/Political Science
Graduate Program: Masters of Business Administration, The George Washington University

How would you describe what you do on a typical day?

A typical day is hard to come by in my line of work, we are constantly trying to stay ahead of the curve and be innovative in our approach to our work. On the most basic level I am a fundraiser. I work to research, develop and nurture relationships between our theatre company and corporations interested in partnering with us. My work requires me to keep a close eye on business press, stay on top of the needs of our partners and manage their benefits. I also help to plan major events and strategically advance our relationships with members of Congress.

What motivates you to go to work everyday?

The Shakespeare Theatre Company is a Tony award winning professional theatre company producing and presenting world-class performances of classical shows. The quality of the artistic work inspires me but I am more motivated by the way in which we are able to reach audiences. We go into every DC public school and teach kids how to embrace classical texts. We bring students into our theatre to interact with performers, designers and directors. We offer free performances every summer to people of all income levels and abilities. We do theatre for everyone, to challenge our audiences’ minds and lift their spirits.

What three words would describe your work environment?

Collaborative. Creative. Fun. 

Tell us about your path to this position.

I absolutely did not expect to have this job when I was an undergrad at UVM. After graduation I moved to DC to seek a job in Senator Patrick Leahy’s office. I secured a position as a scheduler in his personal office and did that for two years. I then worked on energy policy for over a year and finally, worked as a press secretary for nearly two years. All told, I spent five and a half years with the Senator and learned a great deal about what I want and don’t want for my career. I learned that I want to work at the intersection of arts and business and I found a way to do that by returning to school and working part-time at the Shakespeare Theatre Company on the side of my work in the Senate.

What advice do you have for students searching for jobs or internships in your field?

Great fundraisers are needed by organizations of all shapes and sizes, if you have an interest in fundraising work I suggest you read everything you can on current trends and practices, take informational interviews with people working in the field, and know the specific demands of the industry you are most interested in. Also, if possible gather some information or develop an understanding of the financial position of the company you are interested in working for.

Savvy Seniors: Job Countdown!

Posted on March 11, 2013 with No Comments

Cindy Conquest

Cindy Conquest, ‘10
Bachelor of Arts in Biology (Neurobiology), Bachelor of Arts Spanish
Recruiter/ Managing Director with Readak Educational Services

Working in HR, you must see a lot of resumes every day. What helps a candidate stand out?

Sometimes with resumes, less is more. I see resumes that resemble a wordy mockup of an autobiography. Candidates should be able to fit their relevant qualifications on a single, well-structured page. My company often hires for entry-level positions, so we know our applicants will generally be young and have limited experience. I’m looking for quality of experience over quantity. The best resumes are clear and concise.   Keep in mind that relevant skills can come from a wide variety of experiences.

How do you suggest that students follow up on an application most effectively?

A short and sweet follow-up note is always good. Sometimes I am so swamped that I haven’t had a chance to review a particular application and a well-worded note from a candidate will draw my positive attention to that application. The follow-up is most effective right around a week after submittal. It is important to stay in touch with tact.

Once someone makes it to the interview stage, what can they do to seal the deal?

The age-old firm handshake test still rings true. Consistent eye contact shows self-confidence and honesty. Be well-poised and professional, yet amicable and approachable.  Your words and anecdotes should show what they can contribute to the company. Have some well-worded questions of your own that follow up on the research you’ve done. Finally, a thank you note is always well appreciated.

What are some frequent mistakes that you see applicants making?

Typos in resumes/cover letters show lack of attention to the application process. E-mails shouldn’t be written in the same colloquial language that students would use to write to their peers. A red flag in the interview process is when an applicant walks in the door with questions that can easily be answered from our website. Do your research and nicely demonstrate your knowledge.

Want to learn more?

Attend  Savvy Seniors Workshop: Job Countdown, Wed, March 13th, 4:15pm, L&L E-166 (With Special Guest Alison Keefe a Recruiter from Green Mountain Coffee Roasters!)

Attend Readak’s Information Session regarding positions as Traveling Teachers! Wed, March 13th, 6pm, L&L E-166

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