Posts Tagged alumni

Savvy Seniors: Want to Join the Team?

Posted on March 5, 2014 with No Comments

Blue Cross Blue Shield Staff on stairs preparing for race

How to Interview like a Pro: Tips from a Local Recruiter

For most people, an interview creates a lot of stress and anxiety—it is an intimidating way to make a great first impression. For most employers though, the goal of inviting an applicant in for an interview is to get to know them. It’s a meeting based around discovery. We want to know who you are and if you could successfully fit in with the culture of our organization, the position, and the department. We also want you to ask questions that can help you make a decision about whether our company is the right place for you.

Quick tips for standing out & having a successful interview:

  • Dress for the job you’re applying for. It’s okay to ask what the dress code is when you’re scheduling the interview.
  • Make eye contact, smile, and shake the interviewer’s hand.
  • Bring a few copies of your resume with you to the interview.
  • If you have a samples of something that relates to the position you’re applying for, have it on hand (i.e. for a graphic design position, bring some of your design work).
  • Don’t over-think things. Trying to perfect every sentence comes off as robotic.
  • Be natural and be yourself; it is okay to smile and laugh! We can sense when an applicant is putting on a façade.
  • Work experience and qualifications are important, but they’re not everything. We’re trying to find someone who “fits” in with the department and the company as a whole. Try to find something in common with the interviewer and make an emotional connection.
  • As the interview wraps up, ask what the next steps are. In most instances, recruiters are happy to let you know where they are in the hiring process and when you should expect to hear back.

~Myra Fundis, UVM ‘11
Human Resources Wellness Specialist with Blue Cross Blue Shield of Vermont

Want to learn more? Join us and special guest National Life for:
Savvy Seniors: Interview Like a Pro: Tuesday, March 18, 12-1pm at the Hub

World of Work: Nydia E. Guity ’09, Fordham Tremont Community Mental Health Center

Posted on February 12, 2014 with No Comments

Nydia Guity headshotNydia E. Guity ‘09
Mental Health Clinician
Fordham-Tremont Community Mental Health Center at Saint Barnabas Hospital
New York City
Major: Social Work
Graduate Program: Fordham University – Master of Social Work

How would you describe what you do on a typical day?

I service clients for individual, family, and group therapy sessions. Topics range from how to manage depressive / anxiety symptoms to how to build and maintain healthy daily routines.

Tell us about your path to this position.

I am a mental health clinician in an outpatient clinic. At this time my goal is to obtain the License in Clinical Social Work (LCSW) and start a private practice. During my time at UVM, I did not expect that I would pursue a career in social work. My plan at the time was to go back to school for a Masters in Nursing.

How did your time at UVM, both in and out of the classroom, prepare you for your position?

My time at UVM helped me become aware that social work is more than just helping people.  I learned how to work with resistance and focus on strengths in order to progress in treatment.

What advice do you have for students searching for jobs or internships in your field?

My advice would be to be open minded to different settings and open to learning from every experience in the field.

What was your childhood dream job?

My dream job as a child was to be a hair stylist. I always loved helping people and encouraging them to look their best. When you look good you often feel good!

Savvy Seniors: Find Hidden Jobs (One Senior’s True Story)

Posted on January 8, 2014 with No Comments

Michelle LeungSpring semester of my senior year – stressed out and exhausted, I was bogged down with papers, exams, projects, presentations, work and extracurricular commitments. On top of that, I hadn’t yet secured a job for after graduation. Everything was still up in the air and the next several months were filled with uncertainty.

In April, UVM Career Center and the Tower Society collaborated to host a panel and networking event featuring female business leaders. They were asked to share their wisdom and stories on their career path and professional growth. The advice they gave was invaluable and I found myself taking notes.

After the panel, I approached one of the presenters, a Senior Vice President with Human Resources at State Street. I thanked her for her time and shared my desire to work in Human Resources. Meeting her led me to several interviews and two weeks after graduation, I got the call and was offered a job at State Street Corporation!

Now, as a contract Recruiting Coordinator, my days consist of scheduling interviews, sending out offer letters, posting internal and external job openings, facilitating background investigation, and conducting new hire paperwork appointments.

Who knew attending the Women in Leadership Panel would land me a job at State Street? I certainly did not.

To all seniors who are currently in their job search process – keep your head up and don’t get discouraged! Attend networking events and career fairs when you get the chance, connect with those who work in companies you are interested in, make the extra effort to get to know and understand their business – who knows? You might be talking to your future employer. It happened to me.

~Michelle Leung, Class of 2013
Recruiting Coordinator at State Street Bank

Want to learn more? Join us with special guest The Intervale Center for the next Savvy Seniors Workshop: Finding Hidden Jobs Tuesday, January 21, 12-1pm at the Hub!

Begin Networking with Two Easy Steps

Posted on December 5, 2013 with No Comments

Network of diverse peoples

Love it or hate it: Networking is an integral part of any job search, but it doesn’t have to be daunting.

You have likely heard some of the reasons why you should network. The relationships you build connect you to information, organizations, and people- all that may help you direct your next steps. Plus, networking is often the key to unlocking the hidden job market – those jobs and internships that are never publicly posted.

Even amongst all the reasons to network, it can be difficult to get started. Here are two easy steps you can take this winter break:

  • Hold an informational interview. These are short 20-30 minute interviews that you set up to learn from other professionals about their career path, industry, or company. There is not necessarily a job or internship available rather these interviews provide starting points for building professional relationships.

    Try to start with someone you know – a family friend, older sibling of a friend, or reach out to UVM alumnus in your area. Bring questions and an eagerness to learn.

  • Attend a networking event. These events are set up specifically for building networks amongst professionals. Here you can have numerous conversations in one evening and develop those relationships outside of the event.

    This winter break, UVM is hosting networking events in Boston (Jan. 6) and New York (Jan. 8). These events are designed to connect students and UVM alumni in those regions.

Read more about setting up informational interviews and preparing for networking events.

~Lisa

Savvy Seniors: Start “Relationship Building” Today!

Posted on November 7, 2013 with No Comments

Alyson Welch at Machu Pichu

Alumnae Alyson Welch shares her networking experience and advice

What role has networking played in your career exploration and job search?

Networking has played a huge role in my professional development.  Four years ago, I moved to Madrid, Spain and had no idea what I was going to do.  After a few months, I found a job and two internships through networking—through a friend of my mother-in-law, a college contact and a previous internship supervisor.

When we moved back to Vermont almost three years ago, I was concerned about finding a job. I started identifying companies of interest and looking for contacts at these companies.  In three months, I met with four people from Tetra Tech ARD, all referred to me through various contacts (a former UVM professor, a college friend of my husband’s and a friend of a friend that I met at a birthday party.)  When a position opened up at Tetra Tech ARD, I eagerly applied and used the knowledge I had acquired through networking to help write my cover letter and prepare for the interview.

Networking can be a bit intimidating.  What has helped you network effectively?

People are much more willing to share information and provide advice than to give you a job. If you are just looking for information, it’s easier to ask people to chat.

I’m kind of shy, so it’s a little intimidating to me to reach out to people that I don’t know. I’ve tried to challenge myself and send emails or call people, thinking that it’s always worth a shot.  I actually don’t like the word “networking” as it sounds sort of insincere.  I prefer to think of it as meeting people and building relationships that are mutually beneficial. Keeping this in mind makes networking – or relationship-building – more organic and, to me, rewarding.  People were very good to me during my job search and I’ve tried to do the same now that I have a job.

What advice might you give to a senior who isn’t sure how to begin their network?

Keep your request to meet short and simple. Be prepared and have a list of questions ready. Ask people to suggest other contacts. Remember to thank the person. Keep track of who you have met and follow up from time to time.  Try to keep your network alive.  Invite the people you have met to connect on LinkedIn

Also, use LinkedIn to identify UVM alums in your field and reach out to them. Check with professors, co-workers and family/friends to see if they might recommend professional contacts. Think about who is already in your network – maybe your aunt knows someone.  Never doubt the importance of any connection—even if someone is not in your field, you never know who they might know.

The most important thing to do is just start networking.  Once you start, you’ll gain momentum and it can even become fun.  Moreover, I am confident that networking is the best way to ultimately find a job – especially one that you’ll like.

Alyson Welch
Project Manager at Tetra Tech ARD

Want to learn more about networking? Join us for:
Seniors Lunch and Learn: Networking Made Easy!
Wed. Nov 13, 12 pm, the Hub

Get Adobe Flash playerPlugin by wpburn.com wordpress themes