Archive for the resume Category

Five Steps to Take to Find Your Fall Internship

Posted on July 11, 2014 with No Comments

Calendar Pages

Though it’s only July, it’s about that time to start looking for your fall internship. There are many great reasons to pursue an internship, and here are five steps to take to secure an opportunity:

1) Identify what you’re looking for

Is there a certain industry that you would like to test out? Skills you might want to learn? Try to take inventory of what you want so that you can narrow down your search later on. One item that might be easy to narrow down is location: If you plan to take classes at UVM in the fall, you will likely be looking for opportunities within driving distance of Burlington.

2) Start doing your research

Do some searches on Catamount Job Link for internship opportunities near Burlington. Check out Vermont Business for Social Responsibility (VBSR)’s website for a list of companies and organizations offering paid internships. If you have a LinkedIn profile (and you should!) you can also take a look at LinkedIn’s “Find Alumni” tool to see where UVM alumni work in the area.

3) Make your list of targets

Gather the relevant information that you will need for your internship applications: The name of the company, the internship title, the application materials that they require, and due dates. A great way to keep track of your internship applications is to use a simple spreadsheet, like the one below:

Internship Tracking Sheet

4) Assemble your materials

Most internships will require a resume and cover letter. Try to create one based on the samples on our website, and stop by during drop ins to have a career counselor give you feedback on your drafts.

5) Submit your documents and follow up

Persistence can be rewarded. If you haven’t anything from an employer after a week or two, try to politely reach out to confirm that your application was received. Contacting the company demonstrates your continued interest, and can make you stand out of the applicant pool.

Depending on how competitive the field is, students typically apply to anywhere between four and ten internships. Still have questions? Come by our Drop In Hours, or contact the Career Center to set up a one-on-one appointment with a counselor.

~Amanda

Savvy Seniors: Be a Stand Out Applicant & Land the Job

Posted on February 5, 2014 with No Comments

PMG logo

The inside scoop from a local public relations firm

What is an employer looking for?

Here’s what you should know about applying for a position: we are looking for professionalism and creativity above all when sifting through the many resumes.  Please do not try to be cute or funny, stick to the basics and tell us what you could bring to our office.

What do employers notice in an applicant?

Do your research, look at our website, read our blogs: you will gain tremendous insight into who we are and what we do.  Then take that research and apply it to your cover letter.  I look for cover letters that demonstrate an understanding of the business in a clear, concise way.

The most common mistakes I see in cover letters include grammatical errors and misspellings.  Always have a trusted person edit it with you.  You might think it sounds fine, but it never hurts to have another set of eyes look over your work. (This practice continues even in the working world; all of our work goes through several rounds of revisions, no matter what our title may be.)

How and when should I follow up?

Don’t panic if we don’t respond to your email the first day.  We read every application and cover letter closely, but we also have our everyday jobs to tend to.  However, if it has been more than a week, it is fine to send a quick follow up note just reiterating your interest.  Tell us something different about yourself or your interest in our company, rather than just saying “Did you get my application?”  Be creative, professional and persistent.  The application process is a lot like pitching to the media, it might take two or three follow ups to finally get that big hit.

~Beth Parent, Account Supervisor
PMG

People Making Good (PMG) PR specializes exclusively in publicity and media relations.

Learn more at this great workshop with special guest Logic Supply:
Stand out in the Application Process Tuesday, February 18, 12-1pm at the Hub!


Savvy Seniors: Resume Writing- Some Things to Consider

Posted on October 3, 2013 with No Comments

KSV logo

Drafting a resume can be daunting, but if you’re not going to take the time to do it well, don’t bother at all. Competition is tough out there, so get it right.

Here are a few things to consider:

Limit the experience you include

Only include the most relevant work experience, the stuff that pertains to job your trying to get.  Each application you write should be tailored specifically to that position.

Make an impression with your verb selection

When describing work experience, choose verbs that pack a punch. Such phrases as “worked on,” or “contributed to,” won’t impress. Lead with something that allows your work to stand out like “ designed,” or “implemented.”

Typos are your worst enemy

Granted we all make mistakes, but no hiring manager is going to be impressed if your resume is ridden with spelling errors. It pins you as careless, even lazy. Take the time to check, double check and triple check your work.  And it never hurt to get a second pair of eyes to go over your stuff.

Formatting is imperative

Are your margins even? Bullets lined up? Have you included dates and headings in a consistent way? Is it easy to read and visually appealing? Be mindful of all these point. Your sloppiness will be noted.

Join us for the next Senior Workshop with special guest the HowardCenter to learn more about how to make your resume shine!

SENIORS LUNCH + LEARN: RESUMES 2.0

Thursday Oct. 10 12 – 1 PM, Career + Experience Hub

~Alexa Mucklow, Social Media Associate
Kelliher Samets Volk

Savvy Seniors: Top 5 Mistakes that College Seniors Make

Posted on September 12, 2013 with No Comments

Drawing a map

Welcome to your final year at UVM! Those who have gone before you have the wisdom of hindsight: knowing what they wish they had done differently.

Here are some mistakes that you can choose to avoid:

1) Waiting until March to think about what you want to do after graduation.
2) Not taking advantage of Winter Break for networking and informational interviews.
3) Not articulating your skills and strengths and just hoping that employers will magically see your potential.
4) Procrastinating on polishing your resume and sample cover letter until there’s a really good opportunity you want to apply for.
5) Not taking advantage of opportunities to continue to get career experience throughout your senior year, i.e. internships, campus leadership, volunteer etc.

Wondering how to avoid these mistakes and start your senior year off right?

Join us at Careers and Coffee, the kick-off event for a year-long career series especially for seniors! Because how you start your senior year will help determine how you finish it.

Careers and Coffee Thursday, Sept 19th, 3-6pm at the new Career + Experience Hub in the Davis Center Room 100!

~Kala

Including Relevant Coursework on Your Resume

Posted on April 18, 2013 with No Comments

Futurama Fry Meme with Text- 'THIS IS RELEVANT TO MY INTERESTS'

Choosing the content for a resume can be difficult beside sections such as your name and contact information, “Education” and some form of “Relevant Experience”. A section to consider including is “Relevant Coursework” for the following reasons:

Listing rigorous classes under “Relevant Coursework” can exhibit traits such as “hardworking”, “determination, “strong work ethic” and many more that cannot be explicitly stated in a resume. Relevant Coursework describes the knowledge and extent of technical skills. Another use of this section includes filler; if you cannot quite fill up one full page for a resume, relevant coursework can help you get there.

Now, the mechanics of relevant coursework consist of formatting and placement/priority. There are two formatting options: list and bullet point. Choosing between the two is a matter of preference, but the bullet point format with two columns is usually preferred as it optimizes space and is easy to decipher. I would suggest listing between 4 to 8 relevant class titles, not course numbers since class numbers do not mean anything outside the University.

Placement or priority of a relevant coursework section should be taken seriously. The ideal location for Relevant Coursework is a separate section beneath Education or a subsection of Education, as it flows better between sections.

These are the most effective approaches for a Relevant Coursework section. I hope you feel prepared to incorporate your own Relevant Coursework section into your resume.

~Randall, Career Peer Advisor

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