Chapter List for “Living on the Edge”

Edited by Austin Troy and Roger Kennedy

Introduction:

1.     Sprawling out of control: the current state of suburbanization in wildfire zones. By

a.      Austin Troy,  University of Vermont, Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources; Aiken Center Burlington, VT 05405; atroy@uvm.edu

b.     Roger Kennedy, Director Emeritus, the National Museum of American History; former chief National Park Service; 33 Linnaean Street
Cambridge, MA  02138-1511

Institutions and Policy

2.     The origins and legacies of national fire policy. By

a.      Roger Kennedy

3.     Fire policy in the urban intermix. By

a.      Scott Stephens, Division of Ecosystem Science, Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, 137 Mulford Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA., 94720-3114

b.     Brandon Collins, Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, 137 Mulford Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA., 94720-3114; bcollins@nature.berkeley.edu

4.     The role of Smart Growth policies and regional agencies in managing the urban wildland interface.

a.      By Robert Paterson, Graduate Program in Community and Regional Planning, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station B7500 School of Architecture The University of Texas Austin TX 78712-1160

5.     Institutional roadblocks to adopting a wide-scale prescribed burning and fire mitigation regime.   

a.     By Kurt Menning, Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, 137 Mulford Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA., 94720-3114;

The Economics of Hazards

6.     The effects of wildfire disclosure and occurrence on property markets in California. By

a.      Austin Troy

b.     Jeff Romm, Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California, Berkeley, CA., 94720-3114; jeffromm@nature.berkeley.edu

7.     Wildfire Underwriting in California. By

a.      Candysse Miller, Executive Director, Insurance Information Network of California 900 Wilshire Blvd., #1414 Los Angeles, CA  90017

8.     A tale of two policies: California programs that unintentionally promote development in wildland fire hazard zones. By

a.      Austin Troy

Community Involvement

9.     Community involvement in wildfire hazard mitigation and management: Community Based Fire Management, Fire Safe Councils and Community Wildfire Protection Plans. By

a.      David Ganz, TSS Consultants, 2724 Kilgore Road
Rancho Cordova, CA 95670

b.     Austin Troy

c.      David Saah, Spatial Informatics Group, LLC. 1990 Wayne Ave. San Leandro, CA 94577

10.  Wildfires and Human Communities:Current Issues in Research and Practice. By

a.      Patricia Stokowski, University of Vermont, Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources; Aiken Center Burlington, VT 05405

Management and Ecology

11.  Fueling data models in the  urban-wildland interface. By

a.      John Radke, Department of Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720; ratt@gisc.berkeley.edu

12.  The view from above:  a smokejumper’s perspective on the present and future of fire suppression decision-making. By

a.      Ben Machin, Redstart Forestry, Cornith, VT 05039

b.     Mark Hentze, US Forest Service, Redmond Air Center, Redmond, OR 97756

13.  The effects of climate change on the occurrence of western wildfire and its implications for the interface zone. By

a.      William Keeton, University of Vermont, Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources; Aiken Center Burlington, VT 05405

b.     Philip Mote, JISAO/SMA Climate Impact Group, P.O. Box 354235, University of Washington Seattle, Washington 98195

c.      Jerry F. Franklin College of Forest Resources, Box 352100 University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-2100