University of Vermont

Writing in the Disciplines Program

UVM WID: Past Events

Past Events

The Writing in the Disciplines Program offers programming throughout the year open to all faculty and graduate students who teach. We also provide special programming tailored to the needs of school's and departments. Below are our past events. To learn about our current offerings, visit our Workshops and Events Calendar.

2014

Course Goals and Backwards Design: Principles for Creating Engaging Courses

Monday, January 6, 2014 from 12:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Synergy between course goals, assignments and other learning activities is crucial for helping students gain the most from your class. This workshop will provide principles for identifying, writing and utilizing learning goals as the starting point for your course design. Participants will (re)design goals for a current or future course, and then spend time looking at strategies to align assignments and in-class activities with those goals. This workshop includes lunch for participants.

Sponsored by Writing in the Disciplines and the Center for Teaching and Learning.

Effective Peer Review: Helping Students Talk with Each Other About Their Work

Thursday, January 9, 2014 from 10:30 am – 11:45 am

How can students’ responses to each other’s writing help them develop as writers and improve the quality of the papers faculty receive? Thinking about peer review from the students’ and faculty perspectives, we will look at how to design both in-class and out-of-class peer review activities that are really worth doing. Writing Center tutors will provide student perspectives on peer review.

Peer Review Systems: Introducing the Eli Review System and More

Thursday, January 9, 2014 from 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

This hour-long workshop will first introduce participants to the Eli Review System, a write-review-revise tool developed at Michigan State University's Writing in Digital Environments research center. Participants will see how Eli can work to automate aspects of peer review and provide information that can focus the next round of writing, reviewing, and revising. Secondly, participants will have a chance to learn from each other. We invite participants to bring examples of their own work with peer review for discussion. Together, we will explore ways to integrate peer review into the classroom.

Faculty Writing Retreat

Friday, January 10, 2014 from 9:00 am – 2:00 pm

The retreat is simple: we provide a comfortable space, healthy snacks, beverages, and lunch, and no distractions so that you can spend the time working on a writing project (but we usually take a break at lunchtime for supportive conversation). If participants would like a consultation with a librarian or a writing specialist, let us know, but mostly, participants will work in peace and quiet.

Sponsored by the Writing in the Disciplines Program, the Center for Teaching and Learning, and Bailey/Howe Library.

Designing Effective Writing Assignments

Friday, January 24, 2014 from 9:00 am to 10:30 am

This session explores formal writing assignments, looking at strategies for crafting assignments that connect to key course goals or professional priorities, and strategies for supporting students' work on sequenced assignments with class activities or homework.

This workshop is part of the assignment design series sponsored by the Writing in the Disciplines Program, the Center for Teaching and Learning, and Bailey/Howe Library.

Universal Design and Assignments

Friday, February 21, 2014 from 9:00 am to 10:30 am

This workshop applies universal design principles to the art of creating writing assignments. We’ll explore how to create or adapt assignments to create equal opportunities for students to learn.

This workshop is part of the assignment design series sponsored by the Writing in the Disciplines Program, the Center for Teaching and Learning, and Bailey/Howe Library.

Designing Research Assignments

Thursday, April 3, 2014 from 1:00 pm to 2:30 pm

This workshop will help participants develop strategies for scaffolding approaches to researched writing and strategies for developing effective relationships with librarians. Whether you're looking for small activities to add to a course, or guidelines on developing semester-long projects involving research skills, join us for conversation with faculty and librarians.

This workshop is part of the assignment design series sponsored by the Writing in the Disciplines Program, the Center for Teaching and Learning, and Bailey/Howe Library.

Multilingual Writers, Multiliterate Lives

Tuesday, April 8, 2014, 10:00 am to 11:30 am

Join our panel of multilingual professors who will share stories about their experiences living and working with multiple languages. With connections to varied disciplines and varied parts of the world, our panelists explore what experiences encouraged their language development, what roadblocks they have faced in becoming multilingual, and what their multilingual abilities add to their scholarly and professional lives. The ensuing discussion will help us all understand how advanced literacy in multiple languages is achieved. Participants will develop a more rich understanding of what multiliterate and multilingual experiences mean both in and out of the classroom. By talking to panelists who have achieved high levels of success in multiple languages, we can explore what it takes to achieve academic literacy.

This event is being offered in connection with Blackboard Jungle.

Writing with Sources: Promoting Ethics, Avoiding Plagiarism

Thursday, April 10, 2014 from 1:00 pm to 2:30 pm

This workshop will explore ways to help students critically engage with source material for their writing, and strategies for helping students develop ethical writing practices.

Sponsored by the Writing in the Disciplines Program, the Center for Teaching and Learning, and Bailey/Howe Library.

Apply for the Fifth Annual WID Institute

Applications are due Friday, April 18, 2014

The WID Institute supports full-time faculty who are developing or revising an undergraduate course in the major with a significant writing component. This year’s institute is Tuesday – Friday, May 13 – 16. For more information or to download an application, visit www.uvm.edu/wid/institute.

The Mind at Hand: Using Drawing to Help Students Learn Across the Disciplines

Friday, September 5 from 11:00 am to 2:00 pm

During this workshop, we will learn how drawing can be used to help students understand physical and biological structures, growth and change, as well as symbolic representation of processes in a variety of disciplines. We will discuss how visual perception doesn't just provide students with information about particular qualities, objects and events, but how it lays the groundwork for concept formation.

This workshop will be facilitated by Michael Strauss--chemist, professor, and visual artist. He has long embraced writing as a way of learning across the disciplines. More recently, he's expanded his pedagogy to explore the ways drawing helps students learn and communicate in many fields. Join Dr. Strauss in a dynamic workshop which will invite faculty to explore how drawing-to-learn can be practiced in many fields as a way of helping students analyze and integrate important concepts.

Responding to Writing

Tuesday, September 16 from 11:30 am to 12:30 pm

This session focuses on what readers can do to help writers understand how their texts work. We'll pay particular attention to the ways faculty can use response strategies efficiently and clearly–and ways faculty can evaluate what difference those responses make for students.

Teaching in Higher Education

Friday, September 26 from 9:30 am to 11:30 am

This workshop will help you reflect on your teaching practice. We will discuss your teaching so far in your career and we share current research on teaching practices. These practices include: Kuh's High Impact Practices and Universal Design for Learning. (This workshop is a requirement of the Graduate Teaching Program).

Sponsored by Writing in the Disciplines and the Center for Teaching and Learning.

Designing Rubrics

Wednesday, October 8 from 9:30 am to 10:30 am

This workshop, drawing on experiences from UVM faculty who’ve participated in a faculty seminar on grading and responding, will highlight ways rubrics can be used to grade more efficiently and more meaningfully.

Course Goals and Backwards Design: Principles for Engaging Courses

Friday, October 24 from 11:00 am to 1:00 pm

Synergy between course goals, assignments and other learning activities is crucial for helping students achieve. This workshop will provide principles for identifying, writing and utilizing learning goals as part of your course design. Participants will (re)design goals for a current or future course, and then spend time looking at strategies to align assignments and in-class activities with those goals. Participants will also be introduced to Blackboard's alignment tool as one strategy for promoting engagement.

Sponsored by Writing in the Disciplines and the Center for Teaching and Learning.

2013

Writing Wednesdays: a faculty writing retreat

Wednesdays, June 26, 2013 to August 7, 2013 from 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Scheduling writing time in your day is a great way to write more productively. The CTL, WID & the Bailey/Howe Library want to support your writing by setting a block of time and creating a welcoming space for writing during the spring semester through our Weekly Writing retreats. This session offers an opportunity to meet in the morning (9am) for some coffee, tea and snacks followed by dedicated quiet writing time (generally 9:30-12:00). Writers are welcome to bring a brown-bag lunch for the end of the writing session. This is a drop-in program that will be held throughout the spring semester. Some writers might attend every week; others might come and go as other obligations permit.

Sponsored by Writing in the Disciplines, the Center for Teaching and Learning, and the Bailey/Howe Library.

WID Mini Institute on Grading and Responding

Apply by Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Our Mini Institute aims to help faculty who want to find ways to more efficiently and usefully respond to students. This group will meet over breakfast or lunch (meals provided) three times during the fall semester with a follow up in spring. Meetings are arranged according to participants' availability. Participants will also each receive a copy of Barbara Walvoord’s Effective Grading. Join us for a practical and productive set of discussions!

Sound (Teaching) Bite: Grading and Responding: Reducing Stress for You and Your Students

Tuesday, October 8, 2013 at 12:00 pm

Looking for a few tips to ease the burden of responding to student writing? We'll explore a few strategies for focusing your attention and share ideas for reducing the paper load

Sound (Teaching) Bites start at noon and open with a 15-minute presentation highlighting best practices or research findings. Participants are welcome to stay for a brown bag lunch and follow-up conversation about the topic. For a full list of upcoming Sound (Teaching) Bites go to the CTL Events Calendar

Fall Faculty Writing Retreats

Fridays through December 6, 2013 from 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

NOTE: There will be no retreat during Thanksgiving Break

Scheduling writing time in your day is a great way to write more productively. The CTL, WID & the Bailey/Howe Library want to support your writing by setting a block of time and creating a welcoming space for writing during the spring semester through our Weekly Writing retreats. This session offers an opportunity to meet in the morning (9am) for some coffee, tea and snacks followed by dedicated quiet writing time (generally 9:30-12:00). Writers are welcome to bring a brown-bag lunch for the end of the writing session. This is a drop-in program that will be held throughout the spring semester. Some writers might attend every week; others might come and go as other obligations permit.

Sponsored by Writing in the Disciplines, the Center for Teaching and Learning, and the Bailey/Howe Library.

Beyond the Red Ink: Students Talk about Teachers’ Comments

Wednesday, October 16, 2013 from 11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Have you ever wondered why students’ revisions seem to ignore the comments you so laboriously wrote? Are you interested in helping your students understand and use your comments?

During this brown bag lunch (tea, coffee, snacks provided) we will view a short film featuring seven students who talk “openly about the role teachers’ comments have played in their lives as college writers and offer their own advice, in their own words to writing teachers.” The film will be followed by a lively discussion with colleagues.

Course Goals and Backwards Design: Principles for Creating Engaging Courses

Tuesday, October 22, 2013, 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm

Synergy between course goals, assignments and other learning activities is crucial for helping students achieve. This workshop will provide principles for identifying, writing and utilizing learning goals as part of your course design. Participants will (re)design goals for a current or future course, and then spend time looking at strategies to align assignments and in-class activities with those goals.

Sponsored by Writing in the Disciplines and the Center for Teaching and Learning.

The Senior Scientist as Writer: activities and development

Tuesday, October 29, 2013, 11:30 am – 12:30 pm

While an extensive body of literature explores both the rhetoric of science and the teaching of science writing, very little has been written about the perspectives of scientists as writers. In this presentation, Dr. Emerson presents the voices of senior scientists, exploring their writing activities, and their experiences and development as writers of science. While this presentation looks broadly at the attitudes and experiences of scientists in a wide range of disciplines, Dr. Emerson will illustrate key themes using a sample of senior scientists in physics and mathematics. By looking at scientists’ voices through the literature on expertise and literacy expertise, she shows that the majority of senior scientists in these disciplines demonstrate the attributes of the adaptive expert writer, and that most are strongly engaged by writing and see writing as an integral aspect of science.


Dr. Emerson, an Associate Professor in the School of English and Media Studies at Massey University, New Zealand, is visiting as a Fulbright Senior Scholar, hosted by the WID programme at the University of Vermont. She teaches science writing at undergraduate and graduate level, as well as publishing in the fields of science writing, writing in the disciplines, plagiarism, and New Zealand writing programs. She is an award winning teacher, and won the New Zealand Prime Minister’s Supreme Award for Sustained Excellence in Tertiary teaching in 2008.

The Mind at Hand: Using drawing to help students learn across the disciplines.

Tuesday, November 12, 2013, 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm

Michael Strauss--chemist, professor, and visual artist--long embraced writing as a way of learning across the disciplines. More recently, he's expanded his pedagogy to explore the ways drawing helps students learn and communicate in many fields. Join Dr. Strauss in a dynamic workshop which will invite faculty to explore how drawing-to-learn can be practiced in many fields as a way of helping students analyze and integrate important concepts.

Sponsored by Writing in the Disciplines and the Center for Teaching and Learning.

Mentoring Science Writers

Friday, November 15, 2013, 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm

Writing and publication are central to science research, but making the transition to becoming writers of science is a challenge for most research science students. Many science students have no venue in which to discuss scientific writing. This workshop explores the difficulties students face, and discusses what advisors and other mentors can do to help their students become proficient writers of science. It draws on the presenter's research into the writing lives of senior scientists, early career scientists, and graduate students in the US, England, and New Zealand. This workshop will be interactive; participants should leave with a better understanding of strategies they might use to mentor students.


Dr. Emerson, an Associate Professor in the School of English and Media Studies at Massey University, New Zealand, is visiting as a Fulbright Senior Scholar, hosted by the WID programme at the University of Vermont. She teaches science writing at undergraduate and graduate level, as well as publishing in the fields of science writing, writing in the disciplines, plagiarism, and New Zealand writing programs. She is an award winning teacher, and won the New Zealand Prime Minister’s Supreme Award for Sustained Excellence in Tertiary teaching in 2008.

2012

Designing Assignments

Thursday, February 2, 2012, 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm

This session explores formal writing assignments, looking at strategies for crafting assignments that connect to key course goals or professional priorities, and strategies for supporting students' work on sequenced assignments with class activities or homework.

Sound (Teaching) Bites Series

February 7 through April 11 at noon

This spring series offers weekly quick opportunities to learn one or two key strategies to strengthen your teaching. Each Sound (Teaching) Bite will start at noon and open with a 15 minute presentation. Participants are welcome to stay for a brownbag lunch (drinks and snacks provided) and follow-up conversation, but each program is focused so that the opening 15 minutes highlights best practices or research findings. Sound (Teaching) Bites draws on presenters from a variety of faculty development offices at UVM.

Managing the Ups and Downs of Group Projects: a Sound (Teaching) Bite

Tuesday, February 7, 2012, 12:00 pm

Do you find yourself disappointed at students' performance in group projects? Do you wonder why some excel and some just can't seem to make it work? Are you looking for tools, tips, and suggestions - little things that might make group work more successful? This sound (teaching) bite will offer a brief glimpse into the realities of group projects, and point you toward further resources to find a few "quick wins" for group projects in your classes.

Facilitated by Carrie Williams-Howe, the Community-University Partnerships & Service Learning

Using the Rubric Tool in Blackboard: a Sound (Teaching) Bite

Thursday, February 16, 2012, 12:00 pm

With the recent Blackboard update, the Rubric Tool became more useful and can now be shown to students as well as utilized for grading. This Sound (Teaching) Bite will show you how the tool works, help you set up a rubric you can use to help your students better understand your expectations on assignments, and help you grade.

Facilitated by J. Dickinson Anthropology/the Center for Teaching and Learning and Hope Greenberg, the Center for Teaching and Learning

What Students Do With Sources: Plagiarism and Teaching

Friday, February 17, 2012, 10:00am – 11:30am

Visiting scholar Sandra Jamieson, Professor of English at Drew University and co-PI of the Citation Project, a multi-institution study of students' practices when writing with sources, will present an interactive workshop on teaching and plagiarism.

Saving Time While Grading: a Sound (Teaching) Bite

Tuesday, February 21, 2012 at 12:00 pm

Is it possible to grade and respond to student papers effectively and efficiently? This Sound (Teaching) Bite will offer a few core strategies for maximizing the effect of the time spent grading and focusing feedback to students.

Facilitated by Susanmarie Harrington, English/Writing in the Disciplines

When the Classroom Gets Odd: Suggestions for Difficult Teaching Moments: a Sound (Teaching) Bite

Wednesday, February 29, 2012, 12:00 pm

In this session, Sherwood Smith will share 4 key points for transforming a difficult classroom moment to teachable moment. Session will present potential frameworks for engaging, mediating and deflecting these "odd" classroom events. Participants are welcome to bring examples for a facilitated group discussion after a short presentation.

Facilitated by Sherwood Smith, the Center for Cultural Pluralism

Beyond the Library Class Session: Working with Your Liaison Librarian: a Sound (Teaching) Bite

Tuesday, March 13, 2012 at 12:00 pm

This presentation will show how your liaison librarian can support many aspects of your research, course design, and assignment preparation, as well as promote general and discipline-specific information literacy goals.

Facilitated by Daisy Benson, Bailey Howe Library

Across the Drafts: The Role of Feedback in the Writing Process

Wednesday, March 14, 2012, 11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Join us for Across the Drafts a short film in which students and faculty talk candidly about the role that feedback plays in the writing process. This film, a production from Harvard's longitudinal study of student writing, should inspire good discussion afterwards. We'll provide drinks and dessert.

This is the first in a series of films about writing to be shown this semester.

Writing Across Borders: Writing and Culture at UVM

Tuesday, April 10, 2012, 11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Join us for a brownbag lunch (tea, coffee, and cookies provided) and lively discussion of the relationship between culture, writing, and faculty expectations. We’ll view Writing Across Borders, a short film featuring international student writers and faculty across campus. Our conversation will explore how cultural expectations frame our writing expectations, and how assignments and assessments are also shaped by culture.

This is the last in a series of films about writing to be shown this semester. This event is being offered in connection with Blackboard Jungle.

PDFs and Teaching: a Sound (Teaching) Bite

Wednesday, April 11, 2012 at 12:00 pm

This session focuses on PDFs: how you use them in the classroom, how they can be used to create good reading practice by your students, how you create them, how you or your students can annotate them, or how you can customize them.

Facilitated by Hope Greenberg, the Center for Teaching and Learning

Apply for the Fourth Annual WID Institute

Applications are due Friday, April 13, 2012

The WID Institute supports full-time faculty who are developing or revising an undergraduate course in the major with a significant writing component. This year’s institute is Monday – Thursday, May 15 – 18. For more information or to download an application, visit www.uvm.edu/wid/institute.

Fourth Annual WID Institute

Tuesday – Friday, May 15 – 18, 2012, 9 am – 3:30 pm

The WID Institute supports full–time faculty who are developing or revising an undergraduate course in the major with a significant writing component. Through the institute, participants will integrate writing into an undergraduate course, focusing on enhancing student learning. Institute activities will also encourage participants to reflect on their own writing experiences in order to better shape students’ writing experiences. Participants will have opportunities to share their work with colleagues during the following academic year and will have priority in receiving additional WID support as they implement and reflect on their courses.

For more information.

2011

Quantitative Literacy and Writing Series: Assignment Design and Quantitative Reasoning

Monday, January 24, 2011, 1–2:30 pm

This workshop explores strategies for crafting assignments that connect to key course goals or professional priorities, with an emphasis on identifying the particular goals that bring together writing and quantitative thinking. Participants should come prepared to share some examples of assignments currently in use, and part of the session will include working time for outlining topics and priorities for revising or designing assignments.

WID Mini Institute on Writing in Large Classes

Friday, January 28, 2011

Our Mini Institute explores the challenges posed by large classes, and the particular ways writing, teaching, and learning are related in that environment. Participants will share ideas and insights with colleagues from departments across campus and identify key issues they'd like to explore, and WID will provide resources tailored to those issues. The group will meet three times for breakfast or lunch in the spring at a mutually convenient time with a possible follow-up in the fall.

Short and Easy Writing Assignments to Promote Information Literacy

Thursday, February 3, 2011, 1–2:30 pm

Co-sponsored by Bailey/Howe Library and the Center for Teaching and Learning

This workshop, co-sponsored by Bailey/Howe Library, the Center for Teaching and Learning, and WID, invites participants to think about how they design writing assignments requiring information literacy. By looking at in-class activities, homework assignments and assignment design, we will explore how instructors can prepare students to work with librarians and library resources. Our emphasis will be on the use of quick in-class exercises and short writing assignments that will help students practice critical information literacy skills. Whether you’re looking for small activities to add to a course, or guidelines on developing semester-long projects involving research skills, join us for conversation with faculty and librarians.

Quantitative Literacy and Writing Series: Quantitative Reasoning, Writing, and Assessment

Monday, February 7, 2011, 1–2:30 pm

This workshop explores ways to assess writing assignments that deal with quantitative thinking. We will look at sample rubrics and evaluate the strengths and challenges inherent in using rubrics to respond to student work, and we'll also look at strategies for handling the paper load.

Student Research Conference: Abstract Workshop for Students

Wednesday and Thursday, February 9 (12:45–1:45 pm) and 10 (1–2 pm)

Co-sponsored by Bailey/Howe Library and the Center for Teaching and Learning

UVM hosts an annual Student Research Conference to showcase the research and scholarly activity of undergraduate, graduate and medical students across campus. In order to present at the conference you are required to submit an abstract or brief proposal of your research or creative project. This workshop will:

  • help you learn more about the April conference and how you can participate
  • show you how to write a brief, yet compelling and comprehensive, proposal
  • provide hands-on help from Writing Center staff to help you get started

Visit the Student Research Conference page for additional information about the conference.

Quantitative Literacy and Writing Series: Writing to Learn, By the Numbers

Tuesday, March 1, 2011, 1–2:30 pm

This workshop invites participants to create ways to use small writing assignments–in and out of class–to engage students in quantitative reasoning. We'll look at principles of writing-to-learn, examining how short, informal, and often ungraded writing can support students as they learn.

Making Writing Assignments Work for Everyone: Universal Design for Writing

Thursday, March 31, 2011, 1–2:30 pm

Co-sponsored by the Center for Teaching and Learning

Join with colleagues to explore the ways writing assignments can be constructed to enhance the learning of all students. Looking at some basic principles of curriculum and assignment design, we will identify ways that writing assignments can be supported with a range of flexible activities. Participants will have the chance to explore how writing assignments help students learn material as well as how writing assignments ask students to represent what they have already learned. We will look at how other instructors have addressed these questions and also have time for participants to outline strategies they can apply in their own courses.

Teaching First Year Students: A Workshop on Course Design

Friday, April 1, 2011, 9 am–12 pm

Co-sponsored by the Center for Teaching and Learning

This workshop invites faculty to think about designing or adjusting courses to address the needs of first-year students. We'll look at teaching strategies that can help students realize what college expectations are. As we share ideas across departmental boundaries, we will look at ways any first-year course can become a meaningful invitation to find a place at UVM. At some point during the workshop, we will divide into groups by course size, so that those teaching smaller seminars and those teaching larger courses can examine how first-year students' needs can be addressed in those contexts. We'll look at the relationship between in-class activities, formal assignments, and homework in conveying expectations. Participants should leave with many practical strategies for encouraging students to achieve a successful transition.

Short and Easy Writing Assignments to Promote Information Literacy

Monday, April 4, 2011, 1–2:30 pm

This workshop, co-sponsored by Bailey-Howe Library, the Center for Teaching and Learning, and WID, invites participants to think about how they design writing assignments requiring information literacy. By looking at in-class activities, homework assignments and assignment design, we will explore how instructors can prepare students to work with librarians and library resources. Our emphasis will be on the use of quick in-class exercises and short writing assignments that will help students practice critical information literacy skills. Whether you're looking for small activities to add to a course, or guidelines on developing semester-long projects involving research skills, join us for conversation with faculty and librarians.

Co-sponsored by Bailey/Howe Library and the Center for Teaching and Learning

Grading and Responding to Writing

Tuesday, April 12, 2011, 1–2:30 pm

This session focuses on strategies that can help focus student and faculty attention on what's most important in student writing, and strategies for giving feedback to students. We'll explore rubrics, check sheets, and commenting possibilities.

Third Annual WID Institute

Tuesday–Friday, May 17–20, 2011; 9 am–3:30 pm

The WID Institute supports full-time faculty who are developing or revising an undergraduate course with a significant writing component. Through the Institute, participants will integrate writing into an undergraduate course, focusing on enhancing student learning. Institute activities will also encourage participants to reflect on their own writing experiences in order to better shape students' writing experiences. Participants will have opportunities to share their work with colleagues during the following academic year and will have priority in receiving additional WID support as they implement and reflect on their courses.

Summer Faculty Writing Retreat

Tuesdays at 12pm–3pm from June 7 through August 16, 2011

Sponsored by Writing in the Disciplines and the Center for Teaching and Learning

This Session offers an opportunity to meet for a brown-bag lunch (12:00-12:30) followed by dedicated quiet writing time (12:30-3:00) with snacks, coffee and tea provided.

Fall Faculty Writing Retreat

Fridays at 12:30pm–3:30pm through December 9, 2011

Sponsored by Writing in the Disciplines and the Center for Teaching and Learning

This Session offers an opportunity to meet for a brown-bag lunch (12:00-12:30) followed by dedicated quiet writing time (12:30-3:00) with snacks, coffee and tea provided.

No retreat on October 28, November 25 or December 2

Sound (Teaching) Bites

Tuesday and Wednesday at noon, through November 9

Sponsored by Writing in the Disciplines, the Center for Teaching and Learning, Community-University Partnerships & Service Learning and other faculty development units

This new fall series offers quick opportunities to learn one or two key strategies associated with specific teaching topics. There will be 15 minute introductions to topics like running discussions and grading quickly. There will be a different topic every week, and the same information will be presented on Tuesday and Wednesday. See the full schedule on the CTL Sound Bites page.

Short and Easy Writing Assignments to Promote Information Literacy

Thursday, September 29, 1:30–3:00 pm

Sponsored by Bailey/Howe Library, the Center for Teaching and Learning, and Writing in the Disciplines

This workshop invites participants to think about how they design writing assignments requiring information literacy. By looking at in-class activities, homework assignments and assignment design, we will explore how instructors can prepare students to work with librarians and library resources. Our emphasis will be on the use of quick in-class exercises and short writing assignments that will help students practice critical information literacy skills. Whether you’re looking for small activities to add to a course, or guidelines on developing semester-long projects involving research skills, join us for conversation with faculty and librarians.

Writing to Learn

Thursday, October 13, 12:30–2:00

This workshop invites participants to create ways to use small writing assignments–in and out of class–to engage students in quantitative reasoning. We’ll look at principles of writing–to–learn, examining how short, informal, and often ungraded writing can support students as they learn. We will explore connections between low-stakes writing and critical thinking, and the connections between low-stakes writing and disciplinary subject matter.

UVM Burack Lecture featuring Dr. Stephen Brookfield

Tuesday and Wednesday, October 18–19, 2011

Sponsored by UVM President and Provost’s Offices, Community-University Partnerships & Service Learning, the Center for Teaching and Learning, the Center for Cultural Pluralism, and Writing in the Disciplines

Dr. Brookfield is a nationally recognized scholar on teaching and learning, student engagement in the classroom, teaching critical thinking, and adult education. We look forward to his insights about fostering powerful, transformative learning at UVM. In collaboration with the following academic units: Department of Integrated Professional Studies, Educational Leadership and Policy Studies Program, Department of English, UVM Extension.

Skillful Teaching: Engaging Students for Critical Learning
with Dr. Stephen Brookfield

Tuesday, October 18, 4:00pm–5:30pm

Skillful teachers attempt to find out how students experience learning and then use that information to make good pedagogic decisions. Without some knowledge of how our students are learning, the choices we make concerning how and what to teach are stabs in the dark. Teaching skillfully involves us deliberately placing ourselves in the role of student and reflecting on the experience of how we confront difficult and intimidating learning. In this presentation Dr. Stephen Brookfield will draw on his autobiography as both learner and teacher to show this frames four core assumptions of skillful teaching: that good learning constitutes whatever helps students learn, that the most effective teachers reflect critically on their assumptions, that the most important pedagogic knowledge we need is an awareness of how our students learn, and, that context changes everything.

This keynote lecture is free and open to the public.

Designing Writing Assignments that Work for Everyone

Thursday, November 10, 11:30–1:00

This workshop addresses principles of universal design, looking at ways assignments can be created to address all learners in a class–with some attention to the ways assignments can be created to address faculty concerns about time spent grading.

2010

Plagiarism II: Practical Strategies to Help Students Work with Sources

Thursday, November 11, 2010, 11:30 am–1 pm

This workshop explores approaches to teaching writing that cultivate a culture of writing responsibility and integrity. We will investigate and create strategies for structuring assignments and instructor responses designed to reduce cases of plagiarism and better convey instructor expectations.

This workshop is part of a series on the ethics of researched writing. Plagiarism I addresses the causes of plagiarism and the frameworks faculty create for teaching students the value of using sources ethically.

Writing Across Borders: Writing and Culture

Tuesday, October 12, 2010, 11:30 am–1 pm

Join us for a brownbag lunch (tea, coffee, and cookies provided) and lively discussion of the relationship between culture, writing, and faculty expectations. We’ll view Writing Across Borders, a short film featuring international student writers and faculty across campus. Our conversation will explore how cultural expectations frame our writing expectations, and how assignments and assessments are also shaped by culture.

Writing to Learn from Life: Reflective Writing in Experiential Education

Tuesday, October 19, 2010, 2-3:30 pm (part of the National Day on Writing).

Learning from experience doesn’t just happen magically; in order to get the most out of it, a participant needs to process their experience and "harvest" the learning. Reflective writing can be a great tool in this harvesting process. This workshop will briefly outline the theory of experiential education and the role that reflection plays in effectively learning from experience. We will then present a number of writing strategies that could be used to help learners to capture learning from a given experience. Interactive “practice” writing will be included, and participants will be encouraged to think about how they could use this kind of writing in their own lives (professionally and personally).

Co-sponsored by CUPS and WID

Creative, Conversational Writing: Alternative Assignments to Help Students Learn

Wednesday, October 20, 2010, 12–1:30 pm

This workshop considers ways to invite students to respond creatively to academic materials. How can offering opportunities for writing using course concepts in non-traditional ways contribute to learning? Join with colleagues in exploring some possibilities. We will look at examples of student work, try out some creative activities ourselves, and sketch preliminary plans for assignments that would focus students’ attention on connecting with disciplinary concepts.

National Day on Writing at UVM

September 29–October 20, 2010

October 20 is the second annual National Day on Writing, a program organized by the National Council of Teachers of English and the National Writing Project. To celebrate, units and community members are hosting a series of events starting in late September.

Canceled: Plagiarism I: Source Use and Writing Ethics

Wednesday, September 22, 2010, 12–1:30 pm

Plagiarism is among the topics most likely to lead to impassioned conversation among teachers. At this workshop, we'll explore the causes of plagiarism and strategies faculty can use to guide students in working ethically with sources in the disciplines. Focusing on what we expect students to do as they work with sources, we will look at the ways source use adds value to student writing as well as the ways our teaching practices introduce students to the ethical questions that arise about source use.

This workshop is part of a series on the ethics of researched writing. A second workshop addresses strategies for assignment design that foster ethical approaches to source use.

New Faculty Tea

Thursday, September 23, 2010, 3–4:30 pm

We invite faculty who are relatively new to UVM to join us for a colleague tea connecting faculty with people and resources that support teaching and writing at UVM. Come and meet colleagues from across campus, learn about ways the WID, CTL, and CUPS programs can help you teach writing more effectively, and share ideas about challenges and opportunities regarding teaching. We welcome anyone who's feeling new at UVM—whether you’re in your first year or two or three here, you’re welcome at the tea.

This workshop is co-sponsored by the Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL), Community-University Partnerships and Service-Learning (CUPS), the Center for Cultural Pluralism, and the Fleming Museum.

Teaching First-Year Students: A Workshop for TAP and Honors Seminar Faculty

Thursday, August 26, 2010, 9 am–2 pm

TAP and Honors College seminars are designed to introduce students to UVM in particular and college in general. This workshop will help faculty consider the particular social and academic needs of first-year students. As we get ready to start the fall semester, we will look at how our seminars communicate students’ new roles and responsibilities, and our seminars encourage students to connect with the course material, each other, and with us. This workshop will explore how rigorous expectations and a welcoming environment can be constructed. Participants will explore questions such as:

  • How can I structure my course to engage first year students?
  • How can I sequence and construct assignments to increase engagement?
  • How can structure class time and promote quality discussion?
  • What are the connections between writing and engagement?

Participants should leave the workshop with a better understanding of today's first year students, as well as some practical ideas for how to connect with them in more meaningful ways and deepen learning.

This workshop is co-sponsored by the Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL).

WID Institute

Monday–Thursday, May 17–20, 2010, 9 am–3:30 pm

The WID Institute supports full-time faculty who are developing or revising an undergraduate course in the major with a significant writing component. Learn more.

First Fridays: Responding to Writing

Friday, April 2, 2010, 9–10:30 am

This session focuses on what readers can do to help writers understand how their texts work. We'll pay particular attention to the ways faculty can use response strategies efficiently and clearly–and ways faculty can evaluate what difference those responses make for students.

Responding to and Evaluating Writing by ELL Students

Friday, April 9, 2010, 12-1:30 pm

This workshop explores the ways that English Language Learners—students writing in their second (or third or fourth!) language—acquire proficiency in American academic writing. Join us to investigate what faculty can expect in terms of English language development in any given semester, what techniques can make responses to writing more effective, and what campus resources are available for faculty and students interested in this topic.

Writing Across Borders: Writing and Culture at UVM

Tuesday, March 30, 2010, 11 am–12:30 pm

Join us for a brownbag lunch (tea, coffee, and cookies provided) and lively discussion of the relationship between culture, writing, and faculty expectations. We’ll view Writing Across Borders, a short film featuring international student writers and faculty across campus. Our conversation will explore how cultural expectations frame our writing expectations, and how assignments and assessments are also shaped by culture. This event is being offered in connection with Blackboard Jungle 3.

Plagiarism II: Practical Strategies to Help Students Work with Sources

Friday, March 5, 2010, 9–10:30 am

This workshop follows on Plagiarism I, and explores approaches to teaching writing that cultivate a culture of writing responsibility and integrity. We will investigate and create strategies for structuring assignments and instructor responses designed to reduce cases of plagiarism and better convey instructor expectations.

Canceled:
Graduate Student Series: Informal Writing and Student Learning

Thursday, February 18, 2010, 4–5:30 pm

This workshop is part of a series for graduate students co-sponsored by WID and the Center for Teaching and Learning.
Informal writing offers students the chance to explore concepts, make connections, and communicate with instructors. At this workshop, we’ll explore ways instructors can use informal writing techniques to encourage students to work with key course concepts and to learn more about students’ progress in the course—without substantially adding to grading or responding loads.

Plagiarism I: Source Use and Writing Ethics

Friday, February 12, 2010, 9–10:30 am

Plagiarism is among the topics most likely to lead to impassioned conversation among teachers. At this workshop, we’ll explore the causes of plagiarism and strategies faculty can use to guide students in working ethically with sources in the disciplines. We will also reflect on where in our teaching practices we highlight approaches to writing ethics.

This workshop is a prerequiste for Plagiarism II on Friday, March 5.

First Fridays
Peer Review: Student Conversations About Writing

Friday, February 5, 2010, 9–10:30 am

This session explores how having students respond to each other’s writing can help them develop as writers and improve the quality of the papers faculty receive. We will consider how to effectively design both in-class and out-of-class peer review activities, and ways the Writing Center can provide support for this process.

Designing Assignments You'll Want to Read

Thursday, January 14, 2010, 9 am–12 pm

This session explores formal writing assignments, looking at strategies for crafting assignments that connect to key course goals or professional priorities, and strategies for supporting students' work on sequenced assignments with class activities or homework.

Responding to Writing

Friday, January 15, 9 am–12 pm

This workshop will focus on strategies for responding to students’ writing, looking at what kinds of writing faculty choose to respond to, when faculty choose to respond to writing, and ways we might involve students more in the response to their own (or other students’) writing.

Both sessions will be followed by open consultation hours in the afternoon.

2009

First Fridays: Plagiarism, Source Use, and Writing Ethics

Friday, November 6, 2009, 9–10:30 am

Plagiarism is among the topics most likely to lead to impassioned conversation among teachers. At this workshop, we’ll explore the causes of plagiarism, strategies for structuring assignments and responses to reduce cases of plagiarism, and approaches to teaching writing that cultivate a culture of writing responsibility and integrity. Learn more about First Fridays

National Day on Writing Open House

Tuesday, October 20, 2009, 12–1:30 pm

Help us start the new academic year with a celebration by joining us for a Writing in the Disciplines Program open house. We will be celebrating the National Day on Writing and honoring Professor Emeritus of English Toby Fulwiler. Fulwiler was Director of the Faculty Writing Project at UVM from 1984 to 2002. During that time, his work earned UVM national recognition and established the foundation for the Writing in the Disciplines Program's own faculty development work around writing. Refreshments will be provided.

GTA Grading and Responding to Writing

Friday, October 16, 2009, 9–10:30 am

This workshop is for Gradute Teaching Assistants.

Grading and responding to student writing is a challenging task. Instructors have to decide when and how to coach students, when and how to evaluate students, and when and how to draw distinctions among levels of student performance. This workshop will explore the relationship between coaching, judging, teaching, and evaluating. Participants are invited to bring along copies of assignments, grading guidelines, or other course material to help ground the discussion in actual teaching situations.

Designing Assignments and Responding to Writing

Thursday, August 27, 2009

9 am–12 pm (Designing Assignments)

This session explores formal writing assignments, looking at strategies for crafting assignments that connect to key course goals or professional priorities, and strategies for supporting students' work on sequenced assignments with class activities or homework.

12:30–3:30 pm (Responding to Writing)

This session focuses what readers can do to help writers understand how their texts work. We'll pay particular attention to the ways faculty can use response strategies efficiently and clearly–and ways faculty can evaluate what difference those responses make for students.

Attend both sessions, just the morning or just the afternoon. Lunch will be provided.

Writing in Large Classes? Seriously?

Wednesday, August 12, 2009, 12:30–2 pm

Join other colleagues teaching large classes to explore ways in which writing can—and cannot—work to support teaching and learning in large class environments. We'll look at the purposes for writing in large classes, and consider how grading and (non)responding strategies can help students do the work that will help them learn. Another goal of this workshop is to identify faculty interested in exploring and testing teaching practices to learn what works for faculty and students in large classes.

Designing Writing Assignments & Course Experiences for First-Year Students
A Workshop for TAP Faculty

Tuesday–Wednesday, May 19–20, 9:00–4:00pm

This two-day workshop will address strategies for assignment design, in-class activities, and student engagement. Lunch will be provided.

WID Institute

Tuesday–Friday, May 12–15, 2009, 9 a.m.–3:30 p.m.

The Writing in the Disciplines Program presents an exciting opportunity for full-time faculty to participate in professional development activities that bring current research in writing in the disciplines to you. For details, visit our WID Institute page.

Participants:

  • Receive $750 in professional development funds
  • Have access to tailored follow-up activities for and with participants throughout the academic year
  • Explore opportunities to share work with colleagues, locally and nationally
  • Learn from colleagues who are innovative teachers
  • Have the opportunity to participate in the WID Undergraduate Mentor Program, which attaches experienced undergraduate writing tutors to writing-intensive courses for majors

Blogs and Wikis in the Classroom and Beyond

Friday, April 17, 12:00–1:30 p.m.

Creating effective writing assignments is challenging. Blog and wiki tools, like those now available in Blackboard, bring new possibilities for assignments. We will examine what blogs and wikis are, what they might add to assignments, and how they might offer new possibilities for teachers and students in the classroom (or beyond!). Participants will take away ideas for a variety of writing assignments along with the knowledge to begin implementing them.

Facilitated by: Hope Greenberg, Academic Computing Services
Susanmarie Harrington, Director, Writing in the Disciplines Program
Will Webb, Center for Teaching and Learning

First Fridays Workshop: Grading and Responding to Student Writing

Friday, April 3, 9:00–10:30am

First Fridays, a special series aimed at faculty in their first few years of teaching, provides support for thinking about the way writing works in your teaching and an opportunity for informal networking with your peers.

This session focuses on strategies that can help focus student and faculty attention on what’s most important in student writing, and strategies for giving feedback to students. We’ll explore rubrics, check sheets, and commenting possibilities.

Writing Across Borders: Writing, Culture, and Diversity

Tuesday, March 31, 11:00am–12:45pm

Join us for a brownbag lunch (tea, coffee, and cookies provided) and lively discussion of the relationship between culture, writing, and faculty expectations. We’ll view Writing Across Borders, a short film featuring international student writers and faculty across campus. Our conversation will explore how cultural expectations frame our writing expectations, and how assignments and assessments are also shaped by culture.This workshop is being offered in connection with Blackboard Jungle.

Reflection in Action: Strategies for Supporting Experiential Learning through Writing

Thursday, February 12, 12:00-2:00pm

This workshop is presented in collaboration with Community-University Partnerships and Service-Learning.
“Learning by doing” doesn’t happen by accident. In order to get the most out of experiential education, we must facilitate reflective processes that encourage students to analyze and synthesize experiences, and to make critical connections to academic concepts and learning goals. Reflective writing (in various forms) can be a meaningful tool for eliciting this learning. This workshop will examine the experiential learning cycle – including preparation, engagement, post-experience, and evaluation – and present a number of writing and teaching strategies that can be used throughout this process. Participants will leave with a toolbox of strategies to use in their courses, or as internship or independent study supervisors. Facilitators: Carrie Williams Howe, Community-University Partnerships and Service-Learning Susanmarie Harrington and Sue Dinitz, Writing in the Disciplines Program

First Fridays Workshop: Designing Formal Writing Assignments

Friday, February 6, 9:00–10:30am

This session explores strategies for structuring formal writing assignments, looking at how we explain to students what is involved in a given assignment and how we can structure support for the assignment in class sessions and directions. This workshop is part of the First Friday series for faculty in their early years at UVM (but if you’re young at heart in your UVM appointment, please join us!).

Tips for Great Class Discussions: a Sound (Teaching) Bite

Tuesday, March 20, 2012 at 12:00 pm

This session focuses on practical ways to think about, start, and run good class discussions that enhance student learning and create a sense of collaboration and connection among students in your courses.

Facilitated by J. Dickinson, Anthropology/the Center for Teaching and Learning

Shaped by Writing: The Undergraduate Writing Experience

Tuesday, March 27, 2012, 11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Join us for a brownbag lunch (tea, coffee, and cookies provided) and lively discussion about the challenges and rewards of the undergraduate writing experience. Add after the sentence you have. We'll see a short film from the Harvard longitudinal writing study featuring students' discussions of how they navigate academic writing tasks.

This is the second in a series of films about writing to be shown this semester.

Innovative ways to use the Fleming Museum's collections in teaching: a Sound (Teaching) Bite

Thursday, March 29, 2012 at 12:00 pm

Learn how colleagues from across campus have used objects from the Fleming's cultural, historical, and art collections to support teaching across a wide range of disciplines, from mathematics and engineering to ecology, geography, anthropology, among others. We'll discuss how Fleming Museum staff can help you to enhance classroom teaching with object-based pedagogy in support of Gen Ed outcomes and diversity competencies.

Facilitated by Janie Cohen, the Fleming Museum

Writing in the Disciplines Program • 302 Bailey/Howe Library • Burlington, VT 05405

Last modified October 27 2014 02:36 PM

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