Resources

Sharing information is a core principle of our work. Below are newsletters, DVD's, books, and reports available to order, or for free download and use on your farm. In addition to the quarterly Cultivating Connections newsletter and the monthly Pasture Calendar, multiple publications are available to the public through the Center.

For more information or assistance, please contact us at (802) 656-5459 or via email at sustainable.agriculture@uvm.edu. Or else feel free to download this order form and mail your order with payment (if necessary) to:

UVM Center for Sustainable Agriculture
23 Mansfield Ave.
Burlington, VT 05401

Please make checks payable to UVM.
We're not yet able to process online sales, but can accept credit card orders at (802) 656-5459. (For your own protection, please don't email us credit card information.)

Resources available:

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We're also glad to add your events to our calendar. If you are planning or aware of a local activity that would be of interest to grazing and livestock farmers, or anyone interested in sustainable agriculture, feel free to drop us a line to let us know!


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Books

Click on names to view descriptions, and to download or order.

How to Determine the Right Farm Rental Rate
For many beginning farmers, leasing can be an affordable way to gain access to productive farmland and associated infrastructure and equipment. For landowners, leasing can help offset the costs of ownership while keeping farmland in production. But how to determine a fair rental rate?

UVM Extension's new How to Determine the Right Farm Rental Rate Guide was developed to support both farmers and landowners throughthe process of determining a fair cash rental rate for farmland, equipment and infrastructure in Vermont. The same methods might apply to other states in New England, the Northeast or other parts of the United States.

Divided into five sections, the 31-page guide describes approaches to:
Owners and tenants can derive dollar figures for each of the above factors and use them as reference points for negotiating a lease rate.
In the end, it is up to the farmer-tenant and landowner to assess the variables of their particular situation, and determine an equitable rate for their particular arrangement.

31 pages, available only by (free) download.
Best Management Practices to Log-Based Shiitake Cultivation in the Northeast

UVM Extension's Center for Sustainable Agriculture, Cornell Extension and a team of farm advisors have published a guide for growers who want to explore shiitake mushroom cultivation on their own land. Shiitake mushrooms are the second-most cultivated variety in the world, and the demand for locally produced, log-grown shiitakes is high among chefs and consumers. According to the guide, "Forest cultivation of shiitake mushrooms can generate income, diversify farm and forestry enterprises, add value to forestry by-products and create opportunities for timber stand improvement." At publication time, these mushrooms sell for $10-$18 per pound across New England.



The guide is the culmination of a 3 year research and education project, sponsored by a grant from USDA-Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education. The project was led by Ken Mudge of Cornell University, and included Ben Waterman of the University of Vermont, Allen Matthews of Chatham University, Bridgett Jamison Hilshey of the University of Vermont, and 20 commercial Shiitake mushroom producers across the Northeast.



56 pages, available only by (free) download.

Addressing Pasture Compaction: Weighing the Pros and Cons of Two Options

This publication is the result of work proposed by grass-based dairy farmers, who expressed a need for a way to address soil compaction. A collaboration between UVM Extension, researchers, community partners, and grass-based farmers tested and documented Keyline plowing and tillage radishes and the pros and cons of each. UVM Project team: Dr. Josef Gorres, Dr. Rachel Gilker, Jennifer Colby, Bridgett Jamison Hilshey, Partners: Mark Krawczyk (Keyline Vermont) and farmers Brent & Regina Beidler, Guy & Beth Choiniere, John & Rocio Clark, Lyle & Kitty Edwards, and Julie Wolcott & Stephen McCausland

16 pages, available only by (free) download.

UVM Extension Guide to Financing the Community Supported Farm
More and more Vermont farmers are using creative ways to acquire capital for land acquisition, start-up and operation. At the same time, increasing numbers of individuals seek alternative investment vehicles and ways to help finance small businesses within communities. A grant from NE-SARE allowed the Center's New Farmer Project to explore the legal, accounting, environmental and social ramifications involved in these practices by producing this book, available for free download here or via the New Farmer Project website.

Guide to Starting a Commercial Goat Dairy
Turning a passion into a viable business is a line-in-the-sand decision, and this 2012 book by Northeast SARE Farmer Grant Specialist Carol Delaney, A Guide to Starting a Commercial Goat Dairy, covers what farmers should consider when planning a goat dairy startup. It also fills a gap—there are many periodicals and books with information about cow dairying, and this adds some needed weight on the small ruminant side of the scale.

Delaney has taken information developed over her ten years as the Vermont small ruminant dairy specialist and enriched it with practical, science-based information. Topics are illustrated with many photos and tables and include time and financial management, recordkeeping, goat selection, the cost of raising replacements, nutrition, grazing and marketing.

Delaney wrote most of the chapters, but there are also contributors from Extension, the Vermont Dairy Herd Improvement Association, Vermont Butter and Cheese Creamery, the Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets, and private dairy consultants. These chapters offer material on equipment, barn and cheese facilities, udder health, out-of-season breeding, and milk measurement recording. The guide ends with a list of recommended books and contacts that draws on local, national, and international resources.

The result is a clear, close look at the needs of dairy goats and how goat farms connect to regional milk, meat, and livestock markets, along with an emphasis on how to set up records that measure success in terms of time and money. And while the guide was written with the Vermont farmer in mind and includes contributions from Vermont farmers, the content will be useful to any farmer in the Northeast. $25, including shipping, for a bound print copy.

Download for free, or to order a print copy send us an email with your daytime phone number and number of Guides you'd like to order, or download and print this form to mail in with your check.

Carol is also available for more information or to answer questions at cdhornofplenty@gmail.com.

Sustainable Vegetable Production from Start-Up to Market
A book written by Vernon P. Grubinger, vegetable and berry specialist for the University of Vermont Extension and director of the UVM Center for Sustainable Agriculture. Provides practical information on such essential matters as selecting a farm site; planning and record keeping; marketing options; and systems for starting, planting, protecting and harvesting crops. Individual chapters cover fundamental aspects of economic and environmental practices essential to planning and launching a business; the practical implications of sustainability; getting started; farm business management; and marketing. The chapters that follow discuss essential production processes, focusing on soil fertility, composting, crop rotation, cover crops, tillage equipment and field preparation, seeds and transplants, irrigation and spraying systems, harvest and post-harvest handling, season extension, integrated pest management, and environmentally friendly strategies for managing insects, diseases, weeds, and wildlife.

A resource for aspiring and beginning vegetable growers, experienced growers, extension personnel, and serious gardeners, and a useful text for college-level vegetable production courses.

280 pages, 91 illustrations, 36 sidebars, 20 tables. $38.00 postpaid. Download and print this form to mail in with your check.


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Farming & Climate Change: Tools for Farmers

A main thrust of our Farming & Climate Change work at the Center is around helping Vermont farmers adapt to increasing unpredictable rainfall patterns. We are working with farmers to maintain productivity and increase resiliency as they confront increasingly variable conditions.

While it is still being refined, we're glad to offer these preliminary plans for a low-cost sand filter designed to help small farms take advantage of frequently under-utilized ponds on their farm as sources of water for drip-irrigation.

Low Cost Irrigation Sand Filter Plans

We seek to help Vermont farmers adapt to increasingly unpredictable rainfall patterns and more frequent droughty periods associated with climate change. Well-distributed rainfall through the growing season was once more dependable, but now irrigation is becoming a 'must have' risk-management strategy for commercial fruit and vegetable production.

Irrigation is becoming more common in the Northeast as climate variability continues to increase risk of water stress in fruit and vegetable production. Ponds can aid in drought resiliency if water is adequately filtered and used to supply highly efficient micro-irrigation (i.e., "drip") systems. Producers can construct their own sand filter in order to make use of these on-farm water resources.

Commercial models require a substantial, and sometimes cost-prohibitive, investment for small or beginning farmers. But this low-cost alternative offers promise for smaller and newer operations.

Download free Low-Cost Irrigation Sand Filter plans here. We also have a larger version of this file that has higher-resolution images. If you would like for us to send you that file, email us and we'll be glad to provide a link to the (9,100 KB) pdf file.

(Additional resources will be posted here as they become available. In the meantime, contact Joshua Faulkner at joshua.faulkner@uvm.edu for more information on the Farming & Climate Change program or with specific questions about your farm.)

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Directories

Click on names to view and download or order.

2008-2009 New England Dairy/Meat Goat & Sheep Directory
This directory was developed through the Center's Small Ruminant Dairy Project, and lists producers, service providers, and resources for farming with dairy goats, dairy sheep, and meat goats in Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine, Rhode Island, Connecticut and Massachusetts. Producers are listed alphabetically by state/town, and indexed by breed; and service providers are listed alphabetically and indexed by state/town. The directory also lists resources including programs, associations, and periodicals. Download the free PDF here or print this form to mail with $5.00 postpaid if you'd prefer for us to send you a copy.
Resource Guide for Vermont's New and Aspiring Farmers
Produced by the Vermont New Farmer Project, the guide provides considerations and resources that address access to capital, access to production knowledge, access to land, and access to markets. This guide also provides descriptions of Vermont New Farmer Network member organizations including an overview of their services and contact information. (View individual sections on the New Farmer Project website, , download the entire guide, or print this form to mail in with $5.00 postpaid if you'd prefer for us to mail you a copy.
Vermont Grass Farmers' Association 2010 Directory of Grass-Fed Products for Sale
Lists member farms contact information and products available for sale, and highlights topics of interest related to grass-based agriculture. Produced by the Vermont Grass Farmers' Association and the UVM Center for Sustainable Agriculture Pasture Program, 52 pages. (Download the free PDF here)or print this form to mail in with $5.00 postpaid if you'd prefer for us to mail you a copy.

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Fact Sheets

Click on names to view and download. Single copies are free of charge in print or to download. If you would like for us to mail you multiple print copies, we may require a small shipping/handling fee. Order via email or using this form.

Approaches to Biological Control of Insects
1998, by Kimberly Stoner, Vegetable Entomologist at the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station. A discussion of natural controls of pest insects to minimize pesticide use as well as crop damage. 8 pages (Download this PDF file)
Community-Supported Agriculture: Organizing a Successful CSA
1999, by Cathy Roth, UMass Extension Educator, Agronomy Program; and Elizabeth Keen, Indian Line Farm in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. Includes how a CSA works (budget, variety, land, distribution, community and communication, economic vitality) and suggestions for a successful CSA (production, membership, future of community-supported agriculture). 8 pages. (Download this PDF file)
Direct Marketing of Farm Produce
1998, by Vern Grubinger, UVM Extension Vegetable & Berry Specialist and Director of the UVM Center for Sustainable Agriculture. Description of different methods of direct marketing, such as roadside stands, PYO operations, farmers' markets, community supported agriculture, mobile marketing, and mail order. 8 pages. (Download this PDF file)
Farmer Discussion Groups: Getting Started
1999, by Sarah Flack and Kate Duesterberg , UVM Center for Sustainable Agriculture; and Stephanie Gilbert, American Farmland Trust in Northampton, Massachusetts . Provides helpful hints for anyone interested in organizing a Farmer Discussion Group. Includes case studies as well as tips for successful group interaction.6 pages (Download this PDF file)
Introduction to Management Intensive Grazing
1999, by Bill Murphy, UVM Department of Plant & Soil Science. An overview of management intensive grazing with practical tips for setting up a grazing system for all classes of ruminant livestock. 8 pages. (Download this PDF file)
Keeping Farmland Working in Vermont: A Lease Agreements Guide for Landowners and Farmers
2002, by Deb Heleba, Land Link Vermont; with David Major, Major Farm; and Bill Snow, University of Vermont Extension. Provides farmers and landowners with some of the basics involved in putting together an effective agreement to keep the state's "working landscape" open and productive. Includes descriptions of three types of agreements--verbal, lease, and letter of agreement, and considerations on liability, current use taxation, and Accepted Agricultural Practices (AAPs). 8 pages (Download this PDF file)
Pasture Compaction: The Pros and Cons of Two Approaches
2014, by Dr. Josef Gorres, Dr. Rachel Gilker, Jennifer Colby, Bridgett Jamison Hilshey, with Partners: Mark Krawczyk (Keyline Vermont) and farmers Brent & Regina Beidler, Guy & Beth Choiniere, John & Rocio Clark, Lyle & Kitty Edwards, and Julie Wolcott & Stephen McCausland. Working with five Vermont dairy farmers, the project team adapted practices to their pastures, where other farmers could come and observe them in action. They assessed the pros and cons of these approaches and are sharing those results and observations here. (Download this PDF file)
Pasture Improvement Tools: Agroforestry Systems
2013, by Juan Alvez, UVM Center for Sustainable Agriculture. Agroforestry integrates crops, trees and livestock in the same area at the same time. Together these components can create long-lasting sustainable farming practices which can provide short-, medium-, and long-range economic, environmental and social benefits for farmers. 1 page (Download this PDF file)
Pasture Improvement Tools: Bedded Pack Barns & Animal Health
2013, by Juan Alvez, UVM Center for Sustainable Agriculture. Bedded packs (BP) are alternative livestock housing systems that can provide animal welfare, waste management, soil fertility and water quality protection from nutrient overloads. 1 page (Download this PDF file)
Pasture Improvement Tools: Forage Radishes & Keyline Plowing
2012, Rachel Gilker, UVM Center for Sustainable Agriculture. Forage radishes produce a nutritious, high-yielding forage and large taproot capable of penetrating compact soil. Keyline plowing is a mechanical method to alleviate compaction, and a subsoiling practice that is refined in order to avoid turning over soil and decomposing organic matter. 2 pages (Download this PDF file)
Pasture Improvement Tools: Pasture Management & Soil Conservation
2013, by Juan Alvez, UVM Center for Sustainable Agriculture. Livestock farms in Vermont can improve soil and water quality through pasture management. By keeping soils covered, and allowing pastures enough time for rest and recovery, soil health can be built and water quality can be improved. 1 page (Download this PDF file)
Pasture Improvement Tools: Teaching Livestock to Become Weed Managers
2012, by Jenn Colby, UVM Center for Sustainable Agriculture. Smooth bedstraw, goldenrod, Canada thistle, spotted knapweed, milkweed and wild chervil are usually considered undeirable weeds, but are nutritious plants found in many pastures. In animals learn to eat them, it can increase production - and reduce management efforts to get rid of them. 1 page (Download this PDF file)
Pasture Improvement Tools: Water Quality
2013, by Juan Alvez, UVM Center for Sustainable Agriculture. Water quality can be directly benefited by well-managed pastures. 1 page (Download this PDF file)
Pasture Improvement Tools: Why Management-Intensive Grazing?
2013, by Juan Alvez, UVM Center for Sustainable Agriculture. Managment-intensive Grazing is an approach that rotates animals between 10 or more paddocks to ensure that animals are always receiving the most nutritious forage, while letting grazed paddocks get enough resting time for a vigorous re-growth. 1 page (Download this PDF file)
1997, by John Jemison, UMaine Extension Water Quality Specialist; and Chris Jones, Agronomist, Maine NRCS. An overview of watering systems for livestock, particularly useful in management intensive grazing systems. 4 pages. (Download this PDF file)
Produce Safety Fact Sheets & Other Resources for Farmers
Compiled by Ginger Nickerson, UVM Center for Sustainable Agriculture. Documents, links, videos and fact sheets to help produce farmers as they develop, implement, and update their produce safety plans. Includes sections on FSMA, GAPs Certification, Costs & Equipment, Design & Layout Considerations, and more.Visit the Produce Safety Resources page.
Transferring Ownership of Farm Assets or Retiring from Farming
1999, by Dennis Kauppila, UVM Extension Farm Business Management Specialist. Describes the three ways farmers can transfer assets accumulated over years of farming. Especially helpful to farmers who are planning for retirement or who are getting out of farming. 8 pages (Download this PDF file)
Watering Systems for Livestock
1997, by John Jemison, UMaine Extension Water Quality Specialist; and Chris Jones, Agronomist, Maine NRCS. An overview of watering systems for livestock, particularly useful in management intensive grazing systems. 4 pages. (Download this PDF file)
Your First Farm Loan
2000, by Dennis Kauppila, UVM Extension Farm Business Management Specialist. Describes types of loans, getting approval for your loan, business plans, the 5 C's of credit, what lenders look for, and what to do if your loan is denied. 4 pages (Download this PDF file)


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Other Publications

Bedded Pack in Vermont: Five Stories
2012, by Rachel Gilker, Josh Bakelaar, Mark Cannella, and Deb Neher. Happy, healthy, profitable animals are the central goal of livestock farmers. Bedded pack housing can be a path to that goal. 14 pages. (Download this PDF file.)
Greener Pastures
2006, by Betsy Greene and Rachel Gilker. This full-color publication is an in-depth description of how UVM's Ellen A. Hardacre Equine Facility addressed chronic ice and mud issues to help other farmers find ways to improve their own paddocks. 12 pages. (Order from UVM Equine Science Dept.)
Stable Footing for Your Horse
2008, by Betsy Greene and Rachel Gilker. Practical strategies for high traffic area renovation are shared in this full color publication by Rachel Gilker and Betsey Greene. 10 pages. (Order from UVM Equine Science Dept.)
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DVDs

Click on names to view descriptions and download the order form.

Farmers and Their Diversified Horticultural Marketing Strategies
A 49-minute educational DVD featuring 8 farms in 4 northeastern states produced by Vern Grubinger University of Vermont Extension, with funding from Northeast Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) Program, USDA

Content:

To order, download and print this form to mail in with your check.

Farmers and Their Ecological Sweet Corn Production Practices

A 42-minute educational DVD featuring 10 farms in 4 northeastern states produced by Vern Grubinger of University of Vermont Extension, and Ruth Hazzard of University of Massachusetts Extension with funding from Northeast Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) Program, U.S.D.A.

Content:

To order, download and print this form to mail in with your check.

Farmers and their Innovative Cover Crop Techniques

A 70-minute educational DVD featuring 10 farms from 5 northeastern states produced by Vern Grubinger, University of Vermont Extension, with funding from Northeast Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) Program, U.S.D.A.

Content:

Hank Bissell, Lewis Creek Farm, Starksboro VT: Will Stevens, Golden Russett Farm, Shoreham: VT: Cliff Hatch, Upinngill, Gill MA: Eero Ruuttila, Nesenkeag Farm, Litchfield NH: Lou Johns and Robin Ostfeld, Blue Heron Farm, Lodi NY Lou Lego, Elderberry Pond Country Foods, Auburn NY: Lockwood 'Pooh' Sprague, Edgewater Farm, Plainfield NH: Bob Muth, Muth Farms, Williamstown, NJ: Eileen Droescher, Ol' Turtle Farm, Easthampton MA: Steve Groff, Cedar Meadow Farm, Holtwood, PA:

To order, download and print this form to mail in with your check.

High Tunnels: Low-Cost Technology to Increase Yields, Improve Quality, & Extend the Season (DVD & Manual)

A 43-minute educational video featuring 6 farms in 5 northeastern states, produced by Ted Blomgren, Cornell University Cooperative Extension, and Tracy Frisch, Regional Farm and Food Project, with funding from Northeast Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) Program, U.S.D.A.

Content:

Also see the manual that accompanies this DVD.

To order, download and print this form to mail in with your check.

Vegetable Farmers and Their Sustainable Tillage Practices
A 45-minute educational DVD featuring 9 farms in 4 northeastern states, produced by: Vern Grubinger, University of Vermont Extension with funding from Northeast Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) Program, U.S.D.A.

Content:

To order, download and print this form to mail in with your check.

Vegetable Farmers and Their Weed-Control Machines
A 75-minute educational DVD on weed cultivation and flaming equipment, featuring 9 farms in three northeastern states produced by Vern Grubinger, University of Vermont Extension, and Mary Jane Else, University of Massachusetts Extension with funding from Northeast Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE), USDA

Content:

Bob Gray, Four Corners Farm, Newbury VT:

John Arena Jr., Arena Farms, Concord MA: Tim Taylor, Crossroad Farm, Fairlee VT: Chuck Armstrong, Fiddlehead Farm, Brownsville VT: Lockwood 'Pooh' Sprague, Edgewater Farm, Plainfield NH: Gary Gemme, Harvest Farm, Whately MA: Tom Harlow, Kestrel Farm, Westminster VT: Steve and Ray Mong, Applefield Farm, Stow MA: Jake Guest, Killdeer Farm, Norwich VT:

To order, download and print this form to mail in with your check.

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