Mark Malchoff

Title/Position: 
Aquatic Resources Specialist
Institution: 
SUNY Plattsburgh
Education: 

M.S. Environmental Studies, Bard College, 1993
B.S. Natural Resources, Cornell University, 1976

Mark represents LCSG in regional and national fisheries and aquatic habitat initiatives. As the Aquatic Resources Specialist, he leads all activities associated with fisheries extension and aquatic invasive species, and he contributes to lake based sustainable communities and economic development. Prior to his work with LCSG, Mark was employed with New York Sea Grant and Cornell Cooperative Extension since 1984.

Fish and Mercury Brochure

Year: 
2013
Thumbnail image (for featured publication): 
Description: 
Safe eating guidelines based on mercury levels measured in fish throughout Vermont as well as mercury levels found in commercial fish.
Feature: 
No

Post Tournament Release Movements of Black Bass in Lake Champlain

Year: 
2013
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Description: 
Black bass (Micropterus spp.) fishing tournaments on Lake Champlain are popular. Fish stress levels and dispersal patterns were assessed at nine tournaments in 2011 and 2012.
Feature: 
No

Lake Champlain Bass Tournaments: Fact Sheet

Year: 
2013
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Description: 
The catch-and-release bass tournament industry uses practices designed to maximize fish survival and minimize impacts to populations. Recent research has uncovered responses to stress associated with angling, transport and weigh-in at tournaments.
Feature: 
No

Use of external indicators to evaluate stress of largemouth (Micropterus salmoides) and smallmouth (M. dolomieu) bass at tournaments

Year: 
2013
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Description: 
Research conducted on fish stress at catch-and-release tournaments in Plattsburgh, NY.
Feature: 
No

Non-native alewife and native rainbow smelt in Lake Champlain: a modeling approach to describe interactions and system-wide consequences

February 1, 2009 - January 31, 2012
Summary: 
With alewife now established in Lake Champlain, an epilimnetic larval fish predator has been added to the system that can change the seasonal dynamics of young-of-year rainbow smelt by increasing mortality during the summer.

Description

In the past, rainbow smelt have been the main forage fish supporting the salmonid and walleye sport fisheries in Lake Champlain. With alewife now established in the lake, an epilimnetic larval fish predator has been added to the system that can change the seasonal dynamics of young-of-year rainbow smelt by increasing mortality during the summer. We need to understand the consequences of adding such a predator to Lake Champlain.

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