Mark Malchoff

Title/Position: 
Aquatic Resources Specialist
Institution: 
SUNY Plattsburgh
Education: 

M.S. Environmental Studies, Bard College, 1993
B.S. Natural Resources, Cornell University, 1976

Mark represents LCSG in regional and national fisheries and aquatic habitat initiatives. As the Aquatic Resources Specialist, he leads all activities associated with fisheries extension and aquatic invasive species, and he contributes to lake based sustainable communities and economic development. Prior to his work with LCSG, Mark was employed with New York Sea Grant and Cornell Cooperative Extension since 1984.

Invasive Species Interpretive Walk at Point Au Roche

Year: 
2012
Thumbnail image (for featured publication): 
Description: 
A local reporter from Northeast Public Radio (WAMC) joined LCSG researcher Mark Malchoff and graduate student Curtis Buker on a interpretive walk at Point Au Roche State Park, as part of New York's Invasive Species Week.
Feature: 
Feature this publication in the right sidebar

Invasive Species Interpretive Walk at Point Au Roche

Year: 
2012
Description: 
In recognition of Invasive Species Awareness Week (July 8–14) an invasive species interpretive walk will be held from 1:30-3 p.m. Sunday, July 8, at the Point Au Roche Nature Center. The event is free and open to the public.
Feature: 
No

DISTRIBUTION AND ABUNDANCE OF NATIVE RAINBOW SMELT AND NONNATIVE ALEWIFE IN LAKE CHAMPLAIN

Year: 
2010
Description: 
Rainbow smelt are presumed to be native to Lake Champlain and have been the main forage species supporting higher organisms. However, alewife have recently become established here and have the potential to greatly alter the Lake Champlain ecosystem.
Feature: 
No

Feasibility of Champlain Canal Aquatic Nuisance Species Barrier Options

Year: 
2005
Description: 
Current knowledge of aquatic nuisance species (ANS) confirms that new species will continue to invade Lake Champlain via the Champlain Canal. Six canal barrier ideas were proposed and examined.
Feature: 
No

Lake Champlain Alewife Impacts

Year: 
2006
Thumbnail image (for featured publication): 
Description: 
LCSG and the LCBP organized a workshop February 14, 2006 to learn about Alewife impacts from resources managers and scientists. The following “chapters” are a distillation of notes and computer graphic files supplied and edited by the presenters.
Feature: 
No

Feasibility study of ultrasound application for water chestnut (Trapa natans L.) management in Lake Champlain

February 1, 2004 - January 31, 2006
Summary: 
Water chestnut (Trapa natans L.), an annual aquatic plant with floating leaves was first introduced into North America in 1874. This study examined the potential of ultrasound application as an alternative control strategy for water chestnut management.

Description

Water chestnut (Trapa natans L.), an annual aquatic plant with floating leaves was first introduced into North America in 1874. Since then, wild populations have quickly become established in many locations within Northeastern USA. Due to its detrimental effects on the overall health of aquatic ecosystems, millions of dollars have been spent to control the water chestnut infestations in the North America through mechanical harvesting and manual removal, with limited success.

Evaluation of the Champlain Canal as a current vector for invasive species

February 1, 2010 - January 31, 2012
Summary: 
An estimated 40% of the 48 exotic species in Lake Champlain whose invasion route is known arriaved via a canal. The goal of this project is to determine the taxon-specific risk posed by the Champlain Canal for transmitting new exotic species into Lake Champlain.

Description

An estimated 40% of the 48 exotic species in Lake Champlain whose invasion route is known arriaved via a canal. To manage the risk posed by the Champlain Canal, it is important to understand the nature of the risk. The goal of this project is to determine the taxon-specific risk posed by the Champlain Canal for transmitting new exotic species into Lake Champlain.

Non-native alewife and native rainbow smelt in Lake Champlain: a modeling approach to describe interactions and system-wide consequences

February 1, 2009 - January 31, 2012
Summary: 
With alewife now established in Lake Champlain, an epilimnetic larval fish predator has been added to the system that can change the seasonal dynamics of young-of-year rainbow smelt by increasing mortality during the summer.

Description

In the past, rainbow smelt have been the main forage fish supporting the salmonid and walleye sport fisheries in Lake Champlain. With alewife now established in the lake, an epilimnetic larval fish predator has been added to the system that can change the seasonal dynamics of young-of-year rainbow smelt by increasing mortality during the summer. We need to understand the consequences of adding such a predator to Lake Champlain.

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