Content that belongs in Safety for Field and Travel section (safety/travel)

Field Safety

Guidelines are for University Activities that Occur Outside

  1. Develop a detailed schedule and plan for field activities.


Allergic Reactions

Anaphylaxis is a severe allergic reaction to a normally harmless substance, called an allergen.  It is often associated with insect stings (bees, wasps, hornets), foods (tree nuts, peanuts, shellfish), latex and other chemicals.  

Mild allergic reactions produce symptoms such as rash, itchy skin, hives, flushed appearance, swelling skin or lips, nausea and/or abdominal cramps.  These common symptoms of allergic reaction alone do not necessarily indicate a life-threatening emergency.


When Lightning Strikes

Agricultural work must often be done during varying weather conditions. Lightning fatalities rank second to flood in weather-related deaths. No place outside is safe when thunderstorms are in the area.

Check the local weather forecast before starting your work. If you see threatening clouds, use the "30-30 rule".

Poisonous Plants

Poisonous Plants / Photodermatitis


Lyme Disease Prevention





Bees, Wasps, Hornets, Yellowjackets

Working outdoors means coming into contact with all kinds of insects.

Small Airborne Objects

Small Airborne Objects (SAO) / Drone Safety

The purpose of this page is to establish standards of conduct and protocols designed to protect the safety and welfare of the University, community members and campus visitors and to adhere to strict FAA regulations.



This applies to all University students, faculty, staff, campus visitors, and University vendors and contractors on University premises and at University-sponsored events.


Proctor Maple Research Center

The Proctor Maple Research Center consists of about 200 acres of wooded and open land.  Approximately 35-40 acres is an actively managed sugarbush for maple syrup production and research. 

Jericho Research Forest


Jericho Research Forest is located on 478 acres of former agricultural land in the town of Jericho, Vermont. Acquired by the University of Vermont in 1941, it is managed by the Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources, and is utilized extensively by the Forestry Department for both research and education.

Morgan Horse Farm

The UVM Morgan Horse Farm is dedicated to the preservation and improvement of the Morgan Horse through breeding and selection. Designated as a site on the National Register of Historic Places, the farm is also home to significant Morgan history and a variety of educational programs. For over 60 years, the farm has provided educational experiences and training for students and visitors while perpetuating the Battell, Government, and UVM bloodlines. UVM Morgans are prized as superb pleasure horses for recreational use and as foundation broodstock.

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