Lab

Content that belongs in Safety in Laboratories section (safety/lab)

Mercury Thermometer Exchange

Program Highlights

We are working to get elemental mercury out of UVM laboratories as well as the environment. You can help us by swapping your mercury thermometers for non-mercury thermometers. Contact us at esf@uvm.edu and let us know what you need for replacement. The choices are:

Temperature range: -20 to 110 degrees Celsius or -10 to 260 degrees Celsius

Partial or total immersion:

Infectious Agents

Research or teaching activities involving infectious agents must have prior approval by the Institutional Biosafety Committee. Laboratory workers must follow the requirements specified in the Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories as the minimum containment required for this work. In specific instances, containment requirements may be subject to modification by the IBC or the Biosafety Program Coordinator.

Bloodborne Pathogens

Bloodborne Pathogens Information for UVM Laboratory Employees

In Case of Exposure to Potentially Infectious Material, refer to this procedure .

Bloodborne Pathogens Exposure Control Plan

The Exposure Control Plan (ECP) was created to assist UVM in implementing and ensuring compliance with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

Safety Data Sheet Information

Looking for Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)?

We recommend that you first try the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety. UVM has a site license for access to this database, which includes over 100,000 MSDS's, updated quarterly.

You can also check your chemical suppliers ’ websites for MSDS information:

 

Working Alone and High Hazard Work

In general, it is best to avoid working alone at a bench in a laboratory building. It is the laboratory supervisor's responsibility to be sure all laboratory workers are trained in the specific guidelines to minimize the chance of injury, loss of research materials or property damage from working alone.

Chemical Storage and Labeling

Proper Storage of Chemicals

Safe storage of your hazardous laboratory chemicals is dependent on 2 variables: 1) location and 2) the compatibility of the types of chemicals needing to be stored. Your goal is to make sure that chemical containers are stored in places where they aren’t likely to fall or break, but if they do all results will be relatively manageable.

Fume Hoods

Introduction to Chemical Fume Hoods

Chemical Fume Hoods, when used properly and kept in optimal working order, provide an important engineering control that protects users from inhalation of hazardous vapors and gases. Environmental Safety provides training and labeling to help people use fume hoods correctly. You can find the on line course at our http://esf.uvm.edu/courses

Train and Inform Lab Personnel

Supervisors are responsible for making sure that all personnel receive the appropriate safety training before entering the lab or whenever new procedures or hazards are introduced. Refresher training is best provided at regular intervals. Document any lab-specific training that is provided so it can be audited at any time.

Compressed Gases

Securing straps and/or chains should be 2/3 - 3/4 of the way up on every gas cylinder and tightened at all times so compressed gas tanks do not fall over.

Renovating, Relocating or Closing Your Lab

Are you installing new equipment ?

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