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Events Calendar for rsenr



Tuesday, November 5, 2013

Burack Lecture: Thomas A. Heberlein

Time: 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Location: Sugar Maple Ballroom, Davis Cen.
Description: Burack President's Distinguished Lecture: "Avoiding the Cognitive Fix Keeper Hole -- Environmental Solutions Without Attitude Change." Thomas A. Heberlein, professor emeritus, Department of Community and Environmental Sociology, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Sugar Maple Ballroom, Davis Center. Information.

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Wednesday, November 6, 2013

Environmental Monitoring, Evaluation, Protection Conference

Time: 8:00 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.
Location: Holiday Inn, Albany, NY
Description: NYSERDA 2013 EMEP Conference - Linking Science and Policy, Holiday Inn, 205 Wolf Road, Albany, NY. Information & registration: www.nyserda.ny.gov/emep-2013 Registration closes October 29.

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Thursday, November 7, 2013

Environmental Monitoring, Evaluation, Protection Conference

Time: 8:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Location: Holiday Inn, Albany, NY
Description: Day 2. NYSERDA 2013 EMEP Conference - Linking Science and Policy. Holiday Inn, 205 Wolf Road, Albany, NY. Information & registration: www.nyserda.ny.gov/emep-2013 Registration closes October 29.

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David Nowak - iTree for monitoring forests

Time: 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.
Location: Marsh 235
Description: The Vermont Monitoring Cooperative has invited David Nowak to meet with VMC personnel to explore possibilities of using iTree capability in multiple-year monitoring of forested land. iTree is a very powerful set of programs used in assessing some of the values of urban and community forests and in planning and managing urban tree and landscapes.

NR 1 students have been exposed to iTree for the past four years and 200 random iTree plot centers have been identified in Burlington. Walt Poleman has offered the excess seating in Marsh 235 to people who are interested in urban and community forestry and would like to hear about iTree and its current use from Dave. Followed by informal session in Aiken solarium.

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RSENR Seminar: Rich Howarth, Dartmouth College

Time: 4:15 p.m. to 5:15 p.m.
Location: Aiken 102
Description: Professor Environmental Studies, Dartmouth College,“Trees, Carbon, and Albedo: Valuing and Managing Ecosystem Services in the Northern Forest." Aiken 102

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Friday, November 8, 2013

Gund Tea - Richard Donovan

Time: 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Location: Johnson House conference room
Description: 617 Main Street

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RSENR Staff meeting

Time: 1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.
Location: Aiken 311
Description: Interim Dean Jon Erickson will join us to talk about the RSENR Strategic Plan. Location: Aiken 311

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John Adams, Transportation Research Center Seminar

Time: 3:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Location: Farrell Hall, Trinity Campus
Description: "Don't Jersey Vermont: Land Use Policy in the Green Mountain State," John Adams, ACIP, Planning Coordinator, Vermont Department of Housing and Community Development, Farrell Hall, Trinity Campus. Free Pizza! Please RSVP to Zachary.borst@uvm.edu (for pizza count)

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Monday, November 11, 2013

RSENR Graduate Student Chiii Cook-off

Time: 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Location: Aiken 311
Description: Please join the Rubenstein Graduate Student Association for the annual Chili Cook-off! The event will take place in Aiken 311. For $5 you will get to taste all of the tasty chili and vote on your favorites in both meat and vegetarian categories. Half of the proceeds will go to a local charity and the other half will help fund RGSA events. Please BYO bowl and spoon!

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UVM Biology Seminar: Leocadia Paliulis

Time: 11:45 a.m. to 12:45 p.m.
Location: 105 Marsh Life Science Building
Description: Leocadia Paliulis Ph.D., Associate Professor, Bucknell University Biology Department, “How do unattached chromosomes always move together? Cosegregation of X chromosomes in black widow spiders.” 105 Marsh Life Science Building

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Energy Action Seminar: David Hochschild

Time: 4:05 p.m. to 5:20 p.m.
Location: 413 Waterman
Description: 413 Waterman, Cosponsored by the Clean Energy Fund, the Environmental Program, RESNR, the Gund Institute, and CDAE

"California: On the Front Lines of Renewable Policy"

David Hochschild, Environmental Commissioner, California Energy Commission

Commissioner David Hochschild’s career has spanned public service, environmental advocacy and the private sector. He first got involved in the solar energy field in 2001 in San Francisco as a Special Assistant to Mayor Willie Brown where he launched a citywide $100 million initiative to put solar panels on public buildings. He went on to co-found the Vote Solar Initiative, a 60,000-member advocacy organization promoting solar policies at the local, state and federal level. He served as executive director of a national consortium of leading solar manufacturers and worked for five years at Solaria, a solar company in Silicon Valley. In 2007-2008, he served as a commissioner at the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission.

Optional reading/viewing:
www.energy.ca.gov/tour/

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Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Former Governor Howard Dean - Marsh Professor-at-Large

Time: 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Location: Billings North Lounge
Description: The Marsh Professors-at-Large Program proudly welcomes Former Governor of Vermont Howard Dean to lecture at UVM. The topic of his talk is "The First Global Generation and How They Are Changing Everything (At Least in Politics)." Billings North Lounge

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Wednesday, November 13, 2013

UVM 2013 Women's Summit with Angela Y. Davis

Time: 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Location: Davis Center
Description: Featuring Dr. Angela Y. Davis, Distinguished Professor Emerita of History of Consciousness and Feminist Studies, University of California - Santa Cruz.

Dudley H. Davis Center

Registration and Fee Required (registration information available soon!)
Download Save the Date Postcard (PDF):
www.uvm.edu/president/diversity/ws/UVMWomensSummit.pdf

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Thursday, November 14, 2013

National Philanthropy Day Festivitiies for Students

Time: 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
Location: Davis Center
Description: At the Davis Center, My Little Cupcakes will be given away to students. Students can sign a wall, write a hand-written thank-you note to a donor, or record a short video testimonial. Participating in each will earn a student a raffle ticket for a $100 Bookstore gift certificate.

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Burack Lecture: Connie A. Woodhouse

Time: 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Location: Davis Center, Livak Ballroom
Description: UVM Dan and Carole Burack President's Distinguished Lecture: Dr. Connie A. Woodhouse, Professor, School of Geography and Development, Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research and Department of Geosciences, Univerisity of Arizona. "Tree Rings, Drought and Water Resources." Davis Center, Livak Ballroom. Reception immediately following.

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RSENR seminar: Valerie Lazudis, SUNY-ESF

Time: 4:15 p.m. to 5:15 p.m.
Location: Aiken 102
Description: Professor State University of New York College of Environmental Science & Forestry, President USSEE, Aiken 102

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Friday, November 15, 2013

Graduate School Panel for Undergraduates

Time: 2:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Location: Aiken 311
Description: Join a panel discussion with current RSENR graduate students and Student Services Specialist Carolyn Goodwin Kueffner to learn more about grad school applications, the search for the perfect program, tips on the transition from undergraduate to graduate student life, and More! Snacks provided! Aiken 311

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RSENR Master's Thesis Defense: Benjamin Engel

Time: 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Location: Jeffords 234
Description: "INVESTIGATING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MODELED CALCIUM DEPLETION AND RED SPRUCE GROWTH AND RESPONSE TO ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSES"

Jeffords 234

Committee: Paul Schaberg, Adjunct Associate Professor, RSENR, Adviso; Shelly Rayback, Associate Professor, Geography Department, Chair; Jennifer Pontius, Research Assistant Professor, RSENR

Acidic deposition depletes cations such as calcium (Ca) from forest soils and has been linked to the decline of red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) trees in the northeastern United States. To understand the spatial nature of the connection between Ca depletion and tree health and productivity, we used data from a geographically-referenced, steady-state model for New England and New York that produces fine scale (30 m) maps of critical loads (the capacity of a site to tolerate pollution) and exceedance (amounts to which incoming pollution exceeds the critical load) estimates for forests. We examined how growth of red spruce trees in Vermont and New Hampshire is related to modeled estimates of critical loads and exceedance. This comparison was done by examining patterns of growth in red spruce xylem increment cores from sites with a wide range of modeled critical loads and exceedance levels. Exceedance was associated with average growth for the study period (1950-2010) overall, and for the 1970s and 1980s when acid deposition was at its highest, whereas critical load was associated with growth only for 2001-2010. An analysis of the rebound in growth from the region-wide 2003 red spruce winter injury event found that exceedance was linked with growth rebound both overall (2003-2010) as well as annually from 2006-2010, while critical load was not. Regression analyses found similar results, and may indicate potential linear relationships between exceedance and tree growth. Overall, our analyses suggest that modeled critical load and exceedance estimates can help account for tree growth variability and rebound from injury in the field, and that dendrochronological analysis may help infuse a temporal component to steady state critical load models that otherwise lack this context. Recent growth for red spruce exceeds average growth over the dendrochronological record – including growth decades before peak acid loading. The cause of this recent surge in red spruce growth is currently unknown.

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Monday, November 18, 2013

Biology seminar: Brian McGill

Time: 11:45 a.m. to 1:45 p.m.
Location: 105 Marsh Life Science Building
Description: Brian McGill, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Maine, School of Biology and Ecology, “Two efforts to bring physiology into community ecology: functional traits and responses to climate change,” 105 Marsh Life Science Bldg.

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Energy Action Seminar: Klein/Sachs/Peterson/Edsell

Time: 4:05 p.m. to 5:20 p.m.
Location: 413 Waterman
Description: "Paths to Change: Entrepreneurs, Activists and Political Leaders," Tony Klein, Vermont House of Representatives; Beth Sachs, Vermont Energy Investment Corporation; Duane Peterson, SunCommon; Liz Edsell, Vermont Public Interest Research Group. 413 Waterman

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Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Greg White public lecture on global warming

Time: 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Location: Rowell 103
Description: ‘Who's Afraid of Big Bad Global Warming? Climate Change and Migration as a Security Issue’, co-sponsored with Vermont Council on World Affairs, in Rowell 103.

Greg White received his A.B. from Lafayette College, an M.A. in Political Science from the University of Delaware, and the M.A. and Ph.D. (with a minor in African Studies) in Political Science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He arrived at Smith in 1993 and was promoted to professor in 2007. He is Elizabeth Mugar Eveillard '69 Faculty Director of the Global Studies Center and teaches courses on international political economy, global environmental politics, migration and refugees, and North African politics. He is the author of Climate Refugees or Mere Migrants: Climate-Induced Migration, Security, and Borders in a Warming World (Oxford University Press, 2011) and has authored articles in the Review of International Political Economy, Perspectives on Politics, Middle East Journal, and Middle East Policy. He is currently associate editor of the Journal of North African Studies and serves on the boards of the American Institute for Maghrib Studies and the Tangiers American Legation Museum & Research Center in Morocco. He serves of the advisory committees of African Studies, International Studies, and the Environmental Science & Policy Program at Smith, and a member of the Political Science Graduate Faculty at UMass-Amherst. He is the recipient of numerous grants from the Mellon, Ford and MacArthur Foundations, as well as two Fulbrights, and has served in residence at Columbia University’s Earth Institute (2009-10) and as the Class of 1946 Visiting Distinguished Professor in International Environmental Studies at Williams College (2011). In 2011, Professor White also received the Kathleen Compton Sherrerd ’54 and John J. F. Sherrerd Prize for Distinguished Teaching at Smith.

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Ecological Design Collaboratory Opening

Time: 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Location: University Hts South GreenHouse
Description: Join us at the GreenHouse Residential Learning Community to see how you can engage with the Ecological Design Collaboratory and learn about opportunities in the Living Place Design Competition: Creating a Community Crossroads for Ecological Design.

Students in Diane Gayer and Tyler Kobick's course, Catalyzing Ecological Design have developed a design competition open to local designers, high school students and teachers, community members, and university staff and students. Guest speakers will include Felix Wai on Socially Engaged Ecological Design and Scott Carlson on Skills-Based Learning in Higher Education.

There will also be an Art Walk with prints on display from Davis Te Selle and students from Susan Bray's Environmental Art course followed by hors d'oeuvres and open space for collaboration with other participants.

Please RSVP to Leah.Mital-Skiff@uvm.edu to attend.

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Wednesday, November 20, 2013

RSENR Diversity Task Force meeting

Time: 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
Location: Aiken 311
Description: Aiken 311

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Gund Tea - Greg White

Time: 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Location: Gund conference room
Description: Gund conference room, Johnson House, 617 Main Street

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Journalist Scott Carlson talk: "Tools for Life"

Time: 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Location: 311 Aiken
Description: In Aiken 311, join Walt Poleman and the Ecological Design Collaboratory for a talk by Scott Carlson, Senior Reporter at The Chronicle of Higher Education: "Tools for Life: Practical Knowledge, Reinventing Education, and Rebuilding America." Scott authored the Chronicle article on the Aiken Leed Certification.

Our country and our world face enormous challenges: a stagnant economy, climate change, rotting infrastructure, collapsing ecosystems, and resource scarcities. To meet those challenges, we need people who have both abstract and practical knowledge - the sophistication to understand the complexity of the problems, and the practical know-how to come up with sustainable solutions. Cooking. Carpentry. Fixing a car. Growing food. In his lecture, Scott will talk about how hands-on skills like these could provide a foundation for people who want to change society, enrich their education, enhance their lives, and secure their future.

At The Chronicle of Higher Education, Scott writes about sustainability, buildings, campus planning, energy, architecture, and college management - particularly at small colleges. He is a frequent contributor to Grist, a popular site for environmental news, and has also written for national magazines like the Utne Reader and Dwell. He is a contributing writer for Urbanite, an award-winning magazine that focuses on city living and sustainability in Baltimore, MD where Scott resides.

Read more: www.scottthomascarlson.com/p/bio.html

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Info Session on Costa Rica travel course

Time: 7:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Location: Davis Center: Handy Room
Description: Information Session: "Communities, Conservation, and Development in Costa Rica." Join course instructors David Kestenbaum and Walter Kuentzel to learn about this spring semester service-learning course that includes travel to Guadalupe, a small village on the Osa Peninsula in Costa Rica, where students will have the chance to learn about sustainable ecotourism development and community participatory research while participating in service projects in one of the most biodiverse regions on the plant. Handy Room, Davis Center. Information: david.kestenbaum@uvm.edu.

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Thursday, November 21, 2013

RSENR seminar: Lesley-Ann Dupigny-Giroux, VT Climatologist

Time: 4:15 p.m. to 5:15 p.m.
Location: Aiken 102
Description: Associate Professor of Geography, University of Vermont, Vermont State Climatologist, “Multiple View Angle Imagery: From Wetlands to Climate Change," Aiken 102

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Friday, November 22, 2013

RSENR Dissertation Seminar & Defense: Pooja Kanwar

Time: 1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.
Location: Aiken 311
Description: "A Regional ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT AND MultiJurisdictional INSTITUTIONAL ANALYSIS OF THE KAIPARA HARBOUR IN New ZEaland," By Pooja Kanwar

Seminar: 1:00 pm, Green Conference Room in George D. Aiken Center (311)
Defense: 2:00 pm, Green Conference Room in George D. Aiken Center (311)

Committee
Breck Bowden, Ph.D., RSENR, Advisor
Christopher Koliba, Ph.D., CDAE, Department Chair
Jon Erickson, Ph.D., RSENR, Committee Member
Stephanie Kaza, Ph.D., RSENR, Committee Member
Suzie Greenhalgh, Ph.D., Landcare Research, External Additional Committee Member

ABSTRACT
The Kaipara Harbour is the largest enclosed harbour in the Southern Hemisphere, providing resources for several growing industries including agriculture, fisheries and renewable energy. Despite the wide array of political, environmental, and cultural stresses adversely impacting its resources and ecosystems, it presently lacks a comprehensive management plan and the need to prioritize management efforts has become more evident.

This research project examines the complexity of the Kaipara Harbour region through a mixed-methodological, case-study approach. An institutional governance analysis explores the network configuration of the Kaipara system, recognizing the capital flows exchanged amongst actors, action arenas where decision-making occurs, and the system’s adaptive capacity. A semi-quantitative, stakeholder-driven, relative regional risk assessment prioritizes land use stressors and ecological habitats of concern. Finally, a cultural policy analysis investigates the integration of Maori values in multiscalar regulating documents of the Harbour, addressing resource management conflicts and integrated indigenous governance opportunities.

Results of the risk assessment reveal that fisheries are posing the greatest risk to the harbour, and shellfish habitats are characterized with the highest levels of risk. The institutional findings emphasize the importance of informal action-arenas in effective management of the harbour and its resources. The policy analysis concludes the integration of Maori values at the national level is strong in effort although soft in language, and successfully integrated at the district level of regulation. This three-fold dissertation research results in a set of management recommendations for the decision-makers of the Kaipara Harbour.

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RSENR Dissertation Proposal Seminar: Ben DeJong

Time: 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Location: Jeffords 234
Description: Seminar And PhD Dissertation Proposal Defense: "Using The Past As The Key To The Present: Informing Coastal Resource Management With Geologic Records." Seminar 4:00, Jeffords 234. Defense: 5:00, Jeffords 234.


Committee
Paul Bierman, PhD, RSENR & Geology, Advisor
Andrea Lini, PhD, Geology, Committee Chair
Donna Rizzo, PhD, CEMS, Committee Member
Carol Adair, PhD, RSENR, Committee Member


ABSTRACT
As rising sea levels continue to threaten coastal resources on the mid-Atlantic coastal plain region of the Eastern U.S., managers are actively drafting adaptation plans to ensure the persistence of vital habitat. These strategies are generally informed by monitoring records collected over years-to-decades that address what is changing. But they fail to address why or how the changes are proceeding. In recent decades, answers to these fundamental questions are increasingly derived from geologic investigation.

For example, sea level indicators from geologic deposits suggest that over millennial timescales, the land surface has been subsiding in this region. This effect exacerbates sea level rise at the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, a ~27,000 acre haven set aside for migratory waterfowl in 1933. The land surface at the Blackwater Refuge is lowering at approximately the same rate that sea level is rising, so that the relative rate of sea level rise is effectively doubled. Since its establishment, over 5,000 acres of tidal marsh have been eroded and converted to open water in the Blackwater Refuge.

The geology under the Blackwater Refuge preserves deposits from a long history of sea level fluctuations. By reconstructing this history and producing age and climatic proxies for deposits, I will provide a much longer context by which to evaluate the current situation in the mid-Atlantic coastal plain and the processes of land subsidence acting on it. Ultimately, this study better informs the decision-making of managers as they draft adaptation plans for this sensitive landscape in the coming decades.

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Monday, December 2, 2013

RSENR Dissertation Seminar & Defense: Lucas Reusser

Time: 1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.
Location: Aiken 311
Description: QUANTIFYING HUMAN IMPACTS ON NATURAL RATES OF EROSION ALONG CONTINENTAL MARGINS, By Lucas Reusser

Seminar: 1:00 pm, Green Conference Room in George D. Aiken Center (311)
Defense: 2:00 pm, Green Conference Room in George D. Aiken Center (311)

Committee
Paul Bierman, Ph.D., RSENR & Geology, Advisor
Donna Rizzo, Ph.D., CEMS, Committee Chair
Beverley Wemple, Ph.D., RSENR & Geography, Committee Member
Austin Troy, Ph.D., RSENR, Committee Member

ABSTRACT
Humans, through a variety of landuse practices, can profoundly elevate the pace of hillslope erosion and the mass of sediments that move through river networks. Yet to quantify the actual degree of landscape disturbance, we must first establish natural rates of erosion. While this condition has been observed and studied extensively world wide, quantifying the discrepancy between natural and human-induced process rates is difficult and rarely achieved.

This research utilizes concentrations of 10Be in fluvial sediment to locate sources of high sediment production and to model rates of background erosion over millennial timescales for comparison to human-induced rates along two continental margins: the tectonically active eastern margin of the North Island, NZ and the largely stable southern Appalachian Piedmont. Both regions have well documented histories of human-induced landscape degradation and together provide an opportunity to investigate the effects of human landuse practices in widely differing environments.

Along both margins, eroded hillslope materials loosed by deforestation have overwhelmed the carrying capacity of fluvial systems, causing vast amounts of sediment to go into storage across the landscape. In the Waipaoa River Basin, NZ, meteoric 10Be data show that the heavily gullied headwater regions of the system provide sediment at a rate 20 times higher than the more stable lower reaches of the basin. Along the southern Appalachian Piedmont, in situ 10Be model erosion rates indicate that at peak agricultural use around the turn of the century, rates of hillslope erosion (~950 m/My) were more than 100 times greater background erosion.

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Tuesday, December 3, 2013

NSRC Webinar with RSENR alum Rene' Germain

Time: 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Description: Reserve a spot online by contacting graduate student Robin Orr at Robin.Orr@uvm.edu

Rene' is a Forestry 1983 graduate of the School and is now a Professor at the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry in Syracuse. He will present a webinar on "All in the Family: A Case Study of Sustained Yield Management on Vermont Family Farms."

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Wednesday, December 4, 2013

UVM Staff Council Holiday Bazaar & Food Drive

Time: 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Location: Davis Cen. Grand Maple Ballroom
Description: Come check out the traditional and contemporary Vermont arts and crafts from the entire UVM community. If you bring a non-perishable food donation you will receive one free raffle ticket! Limit one free raffle ticket per person. Grand Maple Ballroom, Davis Center.

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RSENR Diversity Task Force meeting

Time: 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
Location: Aiken 311
Description: With Doug Lantagne. Aiken 311

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RSENR Gathering to honor Benjamin Mohla

Time: 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Location: Aiken Solarium
Description: Benjamin Mohla was a senior environmental sciences undergraduate who tragically lost his life just prior to Thanksgiving. We'll be gathering in the Aiken solarium on Wednesday, December 4th at 4 pm to celebrate Ben's life and time at UVM.

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