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Events Calendar for rsenr



Monday, August 3, 2015

RSENR Grants Management Coordinator candidate presentation

Time: 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Location: Aiken 311
Description: Aiken 311
Light refreshments provided

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Tuesday, August 4, 2015

RSENR Grants Management Coordinator candidate presentation

Time: 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Location: Aiken 311
Description: Aiken 311
Light refreshments provided

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Wednesday, August 5, 2015

Lake Champlain Research Experience for Undergraduates Symposium

Time: 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Location: 338 Waterman (Memorial Lounge)
Description: Research poster presentations by the 2015 cohort of UVM Lake Champlain REU students. Reception to follow.

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Wednesday, August 19, 2015

RSENR Master's Seminar & Defense: Emil Tsao

Time: 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Location: Aiken 311
Description: Becoming Transdisciplinary: Exploring Process in a Research Initiative on Climate Change

By Emil J. Tsao

Seminar: 3:30pm, Aiken 311
Defense: 4:30pm, Aiken 311

Committee
Adrian J. Ivakhiv, Professor, RSENR, Advisor
V. Ernesto Mendez, Associate Professor, Plant & Soil Sciences, Chair
Kelly Clark/Keefe, Associate Professor, Leadership and Developmental Sciences

ABSTRACT
The subject of this case study is the Vermont Agricultural Resilience in a Changing Climate initiative, a transdisciplinary research team at UVM that has maintained success in meeting research and outreach objectives despite collaborating in a way that does not follow any particular ideal-type transdisciplinary process. In following recent science and technology (STS) studies’ accounts of cross-disciplinary collaboration, the hypothesis pursued is that the transdisciplinary study of messy or "wicked" problems like climate change brings forth an array of responses from researchers whose disciplinary backgrounds already position them to pursue their research differently, particularly when they involve outside stakeholders in a participatory action research agenda. When not addressed explicitly through the transdisciplinary research framework, these differences are likely to result in more subterranean or affective responses, such as ambivalence and equivocation, which may permeate the collaborative group process. Through a qualitative ethnographic approach, I show that transdisciplinary work is complex and situational, due to the topic itself in agricultural resilience and climate change, the affective nature of the collaborative process, the differences in disciplinary perspectives, the researchers’ subjectivities, and the influence of outside actors in the initiative. I argue that transdisciplinary work must necessarily be challenging given the variety of heterogeneous forces at play, and that deeper attention to the situation elucidates underlying dynamics that are not addressed in the normal research process. This research contributes insights into the literature on transdisciplinary research on messy problems.

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Thursday, August 20, 2015

RSENR Master's Thesis Seminar & Defense: Daniel Curran

Time: 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Location: Aiken 311
Description: Phosphate Removal and Recovery from Wastewater by Natural Materials for Ecologically Engineered Wastewater Treatment Systems

By Daniel T. Curran

Seminar: 12:00 pm, Aiken 311
Defense: 1:00 pm, Aiken 311

Committee
Kimberly F. Wallin, Ph.D., RSENR, Advisor
Stephanie E. Hurley, DDes, Plant and Soil Science, Chair
Donna M. Rizzo, Ph.D., Engineering

ABSTRACT
Eutrophication due to excess loading of phosphorus (P) is a leading cause of water quality degradation. This study investigated P removal and recovery with 4 calcite varieties, wollastonite, dolomite, hydroxylapatite, eggshells, coral sands, biochar, and activated carbon. This was accomplished through a series of batch experiments with synthetic wastewater solutions ranging from 10-100 mg PO4-P/ L. These results informed a large-scale, calcite-based column filter experiments located in the Aiken Center's Eco-Machine. Influent and effluent wastewater were sampled for 64 days. Changes in pH, P concentration and the mass of P adsorbed were utilized as measures of filter performance. Filter media was analyzed for the mineralogical content by X-ray diffraction (XRD).

In the batch experiments, P removal and recovery varied by media and treatment. The best performing materials were calcite, wollastonite, and hydroxylapatite, eggshells, activated carbon, and coral sands. The columns reduced P by 12.53% (se = 1.69) and P adsorption was 0.6490 mg PO4-P/ kg media (se = 0.0546) over a 4 h hydraulic retention time. P reductions were statistically significant (p-value < 0.05) on the majority of sampling dates until saturation. Saturation was reached after 31-35 days. Filter media buffered the pH of the wastewater to approximately 6.0-7.0 with no indication of diminishing buffer capacity. XRD analysis was not able to detect any P species within the filter media.

This research contributes to the understanding of how the selected media perform during P removal and recovery programs, while providing information on the performance of large filters operating within Eco-Machines.

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Wednesday, August 26, 2015

RSENR State of the School

Time: 11:00 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Description: Lunch at 12:15

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RSENR Community Picnic

Time: 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Location: ECHO Lake Aquarium & Science Cen

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Thursday, August 27, 2015

RSENR Retreat

Time: 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

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