Mark Bouton Awarded Gantt Medal by The Pavlovian Society

W. Horsley Gantt Medal
W. Horsley Gantt Medal
Professor Mark Bouton has been awarded the prestigious Gantt Medal for career achievements in the life sciences by The Pavlovian Society. The Gantt Medal, established by the Society following the death of W. Horsley Gantt in 1980, is awarded to individuals who have made distinguished contributions to the fields of psychology, physiology, behavioral neuroscience, psychophysiology, mental health or medicine within the confines of Pavlovian conceptual models or who have contributed significantly to the functioning of the Society.

Mark's research focuses on the role of context in controlling memory and emotion. He is mainly known for the research he and his students have done on extinction, a procedure (and behavioral phenomenon) that is used to eliminate unwanted behaviors and emotions.

W. Horsley Gantt, 1933
W. Horsley Gantt, 1933
W. Horsley Gantt received an M.D. in 1920 from the University of Virginia. Gantt went to Russia in the 1920s with the American Relief Administration, and while there became a student of Pavlov. Gantt devoted his scientific career to furthering an understanding of the connections between physiological functions and behavior. He wrote over 400 scientific articles and several books, and he translated many of Pavlov's works into English.