University of Vermont

Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences

Master of Science in Nutrition and Food Sciences

Fruits, vegetables, eggs and poultry Our NFS Master`s program offers opportunities to pursue specialized study under the tutelage of a widely-published research scientist in a department full of seasoned scholars. The department funds nine graduate fellowships each year(actual number of available fellowships will vary); individual faculty may also fund additional graduate students through grants.

Faculty research encompasses both basic and applied aspects of human nutrition and food science. Current studies focus on Web-based interactive multimedia tools for teaching and research, Internet-based weight management programs, milk chemistry, cheese technology and food microbiology.

Since our faculty members` research interests are diverse, prospective graduate students should visit our faculty info section to review their research interests and contact individual department members for information about ongoing research projects and fellowship/assistantship opportunities.

Graduate student applicants must have a faculty member willing to serve as their major advisor in order to be accepted into the program.

What coursework/research experience is involved?

Our master`s degree in NFS requires 30 credit hours of research and coursework. This includes:
  • Thesis research: 6 to 15 credit hours.
  • A course in statistics (e.g. Stats 211).
  • Research Methods in Nutrition and Food Sciences: (NFS 360): A graduate-level NFS course focused on advanced research methods, including grant preparation, Institutional Review Board (IRB) requirements, data analysis and presentation.
  • Nutrition and Food Sciences Seminar (NFS 350): Weekly meetings focused on research presentations and critiques within the department (2 credits required).
  • Comprehensive Examination (GRAD 387): A written and/or oral comprehensive examination (decided up on by your advisor and thesis committee members).
  • Research and Thesis: Original research (and a written summary of it) conducted under the supervision of your faculty advisor. (Most graduate students also submit their thesis results, usually in condensed form to scholarly journals for publication consideration).
  • Thesis Defense: After presenting your thesis research findings at a public seminar open to the college community, a thesis defense committee (three University of Vermont graduate faculty members, one outside of the department) engage the graduate student in an oral defense of the thesis.

Am I qualified to apply?

Yes if...
  • You are interested in pursuing research in nutrition and food science and
  • You have an undergraduate degree in nutrition, dietetics, food science or another science (such as biology or chemistry) and
  • You have taken an undergraduate course in biochemistry, which has organic chemistry as a prerequisite.
  • You took the GREs with satisfactory results in the general (aptitude) portion.
  • A TOEFL score of 100 or above is required for a funded assistantship.

Interested individuals whose educational and/or professional experiences are not directly related to nutrition and food science are welcomed, too, but need to complete at least one semester of undergraduate-level biochemistry, which has organic chemistry as a prerequisite, before applying.

For more information Contact: Professor Stephen Pintauro, or 802-656-0541.

To apply: Access application materials here

Deadline: Feb 15, for students seeking funding
(assistantships, fellowships).
Decisions are made by March 15.

Applications from students not seeking funding are accepted on a rolling basis.

Last modified May 08 2015 02:23 PM