Research Overview

Overview

XLD Salmonella Research

XLD Salmonella Research

The Microbiology and Molecular Genetics faculty are asking fundamental questions in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell and molecular biology. Our Department applies the methods of microbiology, genetics, biochemistry, bioinformatics, and structural biology to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of the cell. The interdisciplinary nature of these fields means that a prospective graduate student is offered a wide choice of research opportunities. Cross-departmental, interdisciplinary collaborations are facilitated by regular meetings and journal clubs focusing on nucleic acid biochemistry, DNA repair, signal transduction, bacterial pathogenesis, and structural biology and bioinformatics.

The research conducted by the Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics bears directly on crucial health and environmentally related problems such as cancer, AIDS, microbial pathogenesis, and bioremediation. The research programs within the Department are supported by a variety of sources including the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the American Cancer Society, the Department of Energy, and the Environmental Protection Agency. The Department is also the recipient of a 1.8 million dollar award from the Lucille P. Markey Charitable Trust for the establishment of a Center for Molecular Genetics. Investigators have also received funding from private foundations, including the Burroughs Wellcome Foundation and the Pew Charitable Trust.

  • What our students have to say...

    I became an MMG major halfway through my freshman year. I found it was a great choice when I decided I wanted to do something more focused than Biology. The classes were very useful, teaching a variety of important techniques and concepts. I definitely learned a lot from both my lectures and labs. Concepts would often build on each other. Things that I briefly touched on in earlier classes would be explained more during later classes from a different, more detailed perspective. Advising, whether from my advisor or teacher, was also helpful, and my teachers were always available if I needed advice about something. There are many opportunities for research, which I was able to get involved in during my junior year and which I think is vital to many life sciences majors.

    Michael (Microbiology), graduated 2015
Seminar
A Direct Role for Small Molecules and Anti-pili Antibodies in Inhibiting Diarrheal Diseases by Esther Bullitt

Wed February 1st, 2017 at 9:30 AM
HSRF 400

Seminar
TBA by Thomas Silhavy

Wed March 8th, 2017 at 9:30 AM
HSRF 300