Photo Credits

Scanning electron micrograph of a mouse bronchial epithelial cell. Image courtesy of Michele von Turkovich, UVM Microscopy Imaging Center.
Confocal immunofluorescence image of a section through mouse aorta. Macrophages are stained green, actin red, and DNA blue. Image courtesy of Marilyn Wadsworth, UVM Microscopy Imaging Center; sample provided by Dr. Burt Sobel, Department of Medicine.
A canine kidney cell infected with Cryptosporidium parvum.  Confocal microscopy was used to visualize the parasite (green), and both the parasite and host cell nuclei (blue).  Image by Kovi Bessoff, MD, Ph.D. student rotating in the Huston lab.
Crystals of Methanocaldococcus janischii 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase. Image by Fred Faucher, postdoc in the Doublié lab. See Faucher F., et al. (2009) Structure 17:703-12.
Thymine glycol base pairs with adenine and maintains the same minor groove interactions as a canonical Watson Crick base pair. Image by Pierre Aller, postdoc in the Doublié lab. See Aller P. et al., (2007) PNAS 104:814-818.
A beta hairpin loop affects the switching of the primer strand from the polymerase to the exonuclease active site of RB9 DNA polymerase. Image by Pierre Aller & Matt Hogg, postdocs in the Doublié & Wallace labs. See Hogg M., Aller P., et al. (2007) J. Biol. Chem. 282:1432-1444.
Diffraction pattern of CFIm25, a pre-mRNA 3’-end processing factor. Image by Qin Yang, graduate student in the Doublié lab.
Enzymes of the base excision repair pathway repair oxidative DNA damage.

Image by Fred Faucher, postdoc in the Wallace lab.

A human fibroblast cell infected with Toxoplasma gondii. Fluorescence microscopy was used to visualize the nuclei of the parasites and host cells (blue), the parasite plasma membrane (red), and the parasite dense granules (light green).  Image by Mike Wichroski, graduate student in the Ward lab.
The position of a DNA lesion in chromatin DNA can affect the ability of a DNA glycosylase to excise the damaged base. Image by Ian Odell, graduate student in the Pederson lab.
A thymine glycol-adenine base pair captured in the active site of a replicative DNA polymerase. Image by Pierre Aller, postdoc in the Doublié lab. See Aller P. et al., (2007) PNAS 104:814-818.
Rat cerebral artery visualized by immunofluorecence miscrocopy using an antibody against the protein PGP 9.5. Image courtesy of Nicole Bishop, UVM Microscopy Imaging Center; sample provided by Dr. Marilyn Cipolla, Departments of Neurology and Pharmacology.
Scanning electron micrograph of Streptococci. Image courtesy of Michele von Turkovich, UVM Microscopy Imaging Center; sample provided by Dr. Grace Spatafora (Middlebury College).
Crystal structure of Methanocaldococcus janischii 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase in complex with 8-oxoG. Image by Fred Faucher, postdoc in Doublié lab.
  • What our students have to say...

    When I came to UVM I really didn't have any clear idea of what I wanted out of college. I liked biology but I never really felt a connection to it in some 200+ person lecture hall. When I found out about the microbiology program, I really found my calling. Upon my first semester of being part of the program, I was immersed in lab scenarios and hands on learning about the material. The faculty in the MMG department strive to prepare you for a career in the science field and are more than willing to help you along the way. Hearing experiences from my peers in other programs I realize now that the MMG department here at UVM gives you a truly unique experience. Not only that, but the faculty in the department are always accepting new students to pursue research outside the classroom. I was fortunate to be afforded the opportunity to work in the lab of Dr. Christopher Huston, working with Entamoeba histolytica. My time in the lab was invaluable, and I learned so much working in an actual research environment. My experience with MMG has really shaped the career I want to pursue and has given me the clear sense of direction leaving college that I didn't have going in.

    Connor (Double major in Microbiology & Molecular Genetics), graduated 2016