Dr. André-Denis G. Wright

Dr. André-Denis G. Wright
Associate Professor

 

Gastrointestinal Microbiology

For more than 10 years, Dr. Wright worked on developing vaccines and/or
other strategies to increase the efficiency of nutrient utilization in
livestock, and to reduce their enteric methane emissions. His research has
made significant contributions in the area of molecular microbiology,
resulting in novel options being developed to reduce methane emissions from
livestock. Consequently, Dr Wright’s research also suggests that the
manipulation of the rumen microorganisms may increase methane production in
anaerobic digesters as some methane-producing microorganisms are more
efficient and potent than others.

Dr. Wright’s research interests also include human gut microbiology which
are divided into four related areas: (1) Determination of the bacterial and
methanogen profiles in individuals from five major colonic groups: healthy
colon, diverticulosis, inflammatory bowel disease, colon polyps, and
colorectal cancer (CRC). (2) The dynamics of the methanogen population, and
methane production in humans. (3) Determination of the dietary effects on
different microbial populations in the gut. (4) The link between gut
microorganisms and obesity.

Rumen ciliated protozoa.<br />
ADG Wright Photo

Rumen ciliated protozoa.
ADG Wright Photo

Sheep with tanks to measure methane emissions.<br />
Perth, Australia.  ADG Wright Photo.

Sheep with tanks to measure methane emissions.
Perth, Australia. ADG Wright Photo.

Alpacas.  ADG Wright Photo

Alpacas. ADG Wright Photo

Andre-D. Wright

Andre-D. Wright

Office:
104 Terrill
802-656-1192
agwright@uvm.edu

Lab:
101 Terrill
802-656-5479
Lab Website

 

BACKGROUND

Dr. Wright is an Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Animal Science. Before coming to the University of Vermont in 2009, he was a Research Group Leader at the Australian Government’s Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, CSIRO. For more than 10 years, Dr. Wright worked on developing vaccines and/or other strategies to increase the efficiency of nutrient utilization in livestock, and to reduce their enteric methane emissions. His research has made significant contributions in the area of molecular microbiology, resulting in novel options being developed to reduce methane emissions from livestock. Consequently, Dr Wright’s research also suggests that the manipulation of the rumen microorganisms may increase methane production in anaerobic digesters as some methane-producing microorganisms are more efficient and potent than others.


Lab Members

Benoit St. Pierre, Ph.D. Post-Doctoral Associate

Rachel Smith, Research Technician

Sue Ishaq, Ph.D Student
Laura Cersosimo, Ph.D Student

Sean O’Neill, Undergraduate Student
Hannah Lachance, Undergraduate Student
Rebecaa McBride, Undergraduate Student
Nicole Gruszczynski, Undergraduate Student

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

Facey HV, KS Northwood, and A-DG Wright. 2012. Molecular diversity of methanogens in fecal samples from captive Sumatran Orangutans (Pongo abelii). American Journal of Primatology, 74: 460-468. Impact Factor=1.98.

St-Pierre B. and A-DG Wright. 2012. Molecular analysis of methanogenic archaea in the forestomach of the alpaca (Vicugna pacos) reveals differences in population structure between individual hosts. BMC Microbiology 12:1. Impact Factor=2.96

St-Pierre, B. and A-DG Wright. 2012. Diversity of gut methanogens in herbivorous animals. Animal 1-8. Impact Factor=1.46

Franzolin R., B St-Pierre, KS Northwood, and A-DG Wright. 2012. Analysis of rumen methanogen diversity in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) under three different diets. Microbial Ecology. 64: 131-139. Impact Factor=3.25

Turnbull KL, RP Smith and A-DG Wright. 2012. Molecular diversity of methanogens in the hindgut of Bactrian camels (Camelus bactrianus) from two zoos. Research in Veterinary Science 93: 246-249. Impact Factor=1.33

Hook SE, J Dijkstra, A-DG Wright, BW McBride, & J France. 2012. Modelling the distribution of ciliate protozoa in the reticulo-rumen using linear programming. Journal of Dairy Science. 95: 255-265. Impact Factor: 2.50

King EE, RP Smith, B St-Pierre, A-DG Wright. 2011. Differences in the rumen methanogen populations of lactating Jersey and Holstein dairy cows under the same diet regimen. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 77::5682-5687 . Impact Factor=3.78

Samsudin AA, PN Evans, A-DG Wright and R Al Jassim R. 2011. Molecular diversity of the rumen bacteria population in the dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius). Environmental Microbiology, 13: 3024-3035. Impact Factor=5.54

Hook SE, MA Steele, KS Northwood, J Dijkstra, J France, A-DG Wright, BW McBride. 2011. Impact of subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) adaptation and recovery on the density and diversity of bacteria in the rumen of dairy cows. FEMS Microbial Ecology, 78: 275–284. Impact Factor=3.59

Wright A-DG, and AK Klieve. 2011. Does the complexity of the rumen microbial ecology preclude methane mitigation? Animal Feed Science and Technology. 166-167: 248-253. Impact Factor=1.87

Hook SE, MA Steele, KS Northwood, A-DG Wright, and BW McBride. 2011. Impact of high-concentrate feeding and low ruminal pH on methanogens and protozoa in the rumen of dairy cows. Microbial Ecology. 62:94-105

Glad T, VF Kristiansen, KM Nielsen, L Brusetti, A-DG Wright, and MA Sundset. 2010. Ecological characterisation of the colonic microbiota in arctic and sub-arctic seals. Microbial Ecology. 60: 320-330. Impact Factor: 3.25

Wright A-DG, KS Northwood, and NE Obispo. 2009. Rumen-like methanogens identified from the crop of the folivorous South American bird, the hoatzin (Opisthocomus hoazin). ISME Journal, 3:1120-1126 Impact Factor=6.40

All Wright publications