Our Research

Extending chemical shape-control, recognition and catalysis to larger length-scales.

Mesosynthesis Overview

How can the key concepts of chemical synthesis be extended to larger length scales to build new useful materials? In the Schneebeli group, we are investigating this question, using an interdisciplinary approach involving both experiments and theoretical/computational modeling. We are referring to this generalized notion of controlled chemical synthesis at the mesoscale (the nm to µm range) as mesosynthesis.

Mesoscale Shape-Control

We are learning how to connect rigid chiral building blocks to access programmable shapes. This project could revolutionize selective catalysis with larger substrates (e.g. natural and man-made polymers or colloids), since the precise placement of functional groups in 3D-space can be engineered readily using computer modeling.

Mesoscale Shape-Control

We are learning how to connect rigid chiral building blocks to access programmable shapes. This project could revolutionize selective catalysis with larger substrates (e.g. natural and man-made polymers or colloids), since the precise placement of functional groups in 3D-space can be engineered readily using computer modeling.

Mesoscale Shape-Control

We are learning how to connect rigid chiral building blocks to access programmable shapes. This project could revolutionize selective catalysis with larger substrates (e.g. natural and man-made polymers or colloids), since the precise placement of functional groups in 3D-space can be engineered readily using computer modeling.

Mesoscale Recognition

Inspired by DNA, we are using theory and experiments to uncover the physical rules governing selective interactions in non-natural supramolecular polymers. This knowledge is needed to advance the engineering of complex man-made materials that are stable and more freely tunable than DNA.

Mesoscale Recognition

Inspired by DNA, we are using theory and experiments to uncover the physical rules governing selective interactions in non-natural supramolecular polymers. This knowledge is needed to advance the engineering of complex man-made materials that are stable and more freely tunable than DNA.

Mesoscale Recognition

Inspired by DNA, we are using theory and experiments to uncover the physical rules governing selective interactions in non-natural supramolecular polymers. This knowledge is needed to advance the engineering of complex man-made materials that are stable and more freely tunable than DNA.

Mesoscale Catalysis

Selective chemical catalysis has provided access to many new useful materials at the molecular scale. But, is it possible to harness the power of catalysis to create larger complex objects under mild conditions? We are exploring this questions by creating catalysts, which operate on colloidal objects (nanoparticles, nanorods, cells, etc.) as the starting materials.

Mesoscale Catalysis

Selective chemical catalysis has provided access to many new useful materials at the molecular scale. But, is it possible to harness the power of catalysis to create larger complex objects under mild conditions? We are exploring this questions by creating catalysts, which operate on colloidal objects (nanoparticles, nanorods, cells, etc.) as the starting materials.

Mesoscale Catalysis

Selective chemical catalysis has provided access to many new useful materials at the molecular scale. But, is it possible to harness the power of catalysis to create larger complex objects under mild conditions? We are exploring this questions by creating catalysts, which operate on colloidal objects (nanoparticles, nanorods, cells, etc.) as the starting materials.