University of Vermont

College of Medicine

Vermont Medicine Magazine

UVM College of Medicine Centers ~ 2012 Annual Report

Selected Highlights

  • The Center of Biomedical Research Excellence in Neuroscience received a $600,000 NIH Shared Instrument grant to purchase a second multi-photon microscope for the COBRE Imaging Core.
  • Faculty connected to the Vermont Center for Immunology and Infectious Diseases COBRE published 213 original research papers and secured nearly $48 million in research dollars in 2012, not counting the COBRE funds.
  • The Center for Clinical and Translational Research plans to offer a certificate, a master of science and a doctor of philosophy degree in clinical and translational science. The common curriculum for these programs will be applicable to all kinds of early and late translational as well as clinical research.

Center of Biomedical Research Excellence in Neuroscience

The Center of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE) in Neuroscience was created in 2001 by a grant from the NIH National Center of Research Resources to enhance neuroscience research and training infrastructure at the University of Vermont. This grant supported the creation of two multi-user research cores: an Imaging/ Physiology Core, which provides access to sophisticated imaging equipment dedicated to live imaging and a Cell/Molecular Core, which provides personnel and access to sophisticated equipment required to complete cellular and molecular biology experiments. The Neuroscience COBRE also created a Translational Core that facilitates interactions between clinical and basic neuroscientists and supported a summer undergraduate research program. Funds to support multi-year research projects for junior investigators were provided in the first 10 years of the award. In 2011, five additional years of NIH support for the Neuroscience COBRE Center was successfully obtained, which supports the research cores created in the first ten years of COBRE funding and supports one-year Pilot Projects in the areas of stroke and neurovascular interactions or neural regulation of autonomic nervous system development, function and disorders. A highlight of the past year is the award of a $600,000 NIH Shared Instrument grant to purchase a second Multi-photon microscope for the COBRE Imaging Core.

Center for Clinical and Translational Science

Clinical and Translational Science (CTS) is the body of knowledge that spans basic biology, clinical medicine and health policy. Clinical and translational scientists use this knowledge to develop new approaches and systems to improve human health. Studies in CTS help us translate knowledge from the cellular and molecular level into interventions for individuals and populations. It is the mission of the UVM Center for Clinical and Translational Science to provide a seamless opportunity for young professionals to be trained in clinical and translational research and to have opportunities to be supported in a fellowship to allow them to actually perform such research in conjunction with a mentor. The eventual goal is for them to write successful grants, become independently funded and form the next generation of well-trained clinical and translational researchers. To that end, the Center for Clinical and Translational Research plans to offer a certificate, a master of science and a doctor of philosophy degree in clinical and translational science. The common curriculum for these programs will be applicable to all kinds of early and late translational as well as clinical research.

Vermont Cancer Center

The Vermont Cancer Center (VCC) is a not-for-profit comprehensive clinical and research cancer center, the only such organization in the state of Vermont. Founded in 1974, the VCC is located within the UVM College of Medicine and enjoys a clinical partnership with Fletcher Allen Health Care. The organization comprises more than 120 scientists and physicians engaged in a full range of basic, translational, clinical, and outcomes research that seeks to uncover new knowledge and understanding about cancer and the issues that affect people with the disease. The VCC is committed to innovative cancer research, life-saving prevention and treatment programs, public education and scientific collaboration, and serves to influence standards of cancer prevention, screening, diagnosis and care across Vermont and northern New York. High-quality cancer care is provided through the patient care areas at Fletcher Allen, including several multidisciplinary clinics. A central part of the VCC mission is to share with the public — as well as with other cancer providers, researchers, and health care experts — the latest information on cancer prevention and screening, diagnostics and treatment, as well as advances in clinical and laboratory research and issues of survivorship. To that end, the VCC hosts an annual Breast Cancer Conference for the public, as well as many academic lectures and professional meetings and symposia for cancer care providers and researchers.

Vermont Center for Immunology and Infectious Diseases COBRE

The focus of the Vermont Center for Immunology and Infectious Diseases (VCIID) is the host response to infections. During the first five years of Phase I COBRE NIH funding, the center expanded from nine founding senior faculty to the current 23 faculty spanning eight departments in four colleges. Faculty published 213 original research papers and secured nearly $48 million in research dollars in 2012, not counting the COBRE funds. In July 2011 Phase II of the COBRE grant from NIH began for a second five years. This nearly $11 million will support new junior and senior faculty, an annual retreat, students, a robust seminar series of outside nationally recognized research, and pilot grants to foster new collaborations. Some highlights of the past year include: Beth Kirkpatrick, M.D. receiving the Bailey K. Ashford Medal from the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene; Aimee Shen, Ph.D., receiving a prestigious Pew Scholars Award in the Biomedical Sciences; Matt Wargo, Ph.D. receiving a superlative 5th percentile score on the first try of his first R01 grant; and Ralph Budd, M.D., was inducted into Association of American Physicians, the national honorary society for physician-scientists.

Vermont Lung Center

The Vermont Lung Center (VLC), a program on lung biology and disease, has been in existence at the UVM College of Medicine since 1972. It has had a rich and productive past that has had a significant impact nationally. The field is an important one: Lung disease is a significant cause of mortality and especially morbidity in the U.S. While the six other leading causes of death have decreased over the last decade, all forms of lung disease continue to rise. If we are to make significant progress in combating this pressing health problem, we will need to have trained scientists and resources to study the causes and cures of lung disease. The keystone to the VLC program is translational research. The goals of the VLC are to investigate the mechanisms of lung biology and disease, and to train and retain outstanding translational scientists at UVM. Our key product is excellence. The current program centers around a five-year award by the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR) of the NIH. The VLC is a NCRR Center of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE).

Last modified January 24 2013 09:51 AM