University of Vermont

Vermont Cancer Center's 17th Annual Breast Cancer Conference

Breast Cancer Facts

Breast Cancer Facts

 

  • Women older than 40 should discuss their risk factors for developing breast cancer with their primary care provider and tailor their screening according to their risk and personal preferences. Women who are younger than 40 and have risk factors for breast cancer should discuss these risk factors with their health care provider to determine whether screening mammograms are appropriate for them and how often to have them.
  • Breast cancer is the most common non-skin cancer among women.
  • In Vermont, breast cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in women, averaging 473 new cases each year.
  • While it is estimated that over 220,000 women are diagnosed and over 40,000 women die of breast cancer every year, death rates from breast cancer have steadily declined over the past decade.
  • From 1999-2006, nearly 90% of women diagnosed with breast cancer survived their disease at least 5 years.
  • A woman’s chance of developing breast cancer increases with age. In the United States, a woman has about a 13.2 percent, or 1 in 8, lifetime risk of developing breast cancer.
  • Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among women. Each year in Vermont, approximately 92 women die from breast cancer.
  • From 2003-2007, the median age at diagnosis for cancer of the breast was 61 years of age.
  • Your best chance for surviving breast cancer is detecting it early. When found early, there is a 98% chance for cure.
  • Breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) followed by local radiation therapy has replaced mastectomy as the preferred surgical approach for treating women with early stage breast cancer.
  • In Vermont, 63% of breast cancers are diagnosed at the localized (early) stage.
  • Only 5%–10% of breast cancers are hereditary. The majority of women who develop breast cancer have no known significant family history of cancer.
  • Although breast cancer in men is rare, an estimated 2,150 men will be diagnosed with breast cancer and approximately 410 will die this year.

 

 

Last modified April 24 2013 03:32 PM