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Tracy Named Interim Senior Associate Dean for Research (6-30-2014)
University of Vermont College of Medicine Dean Frederick Morin, M.D., has announced that Russell Tracy, Ph.D., professor of pathology and biochemistry, director of the Laboratory for Clinical Biochemistry Research, and former senior associate dean for research and academic affairs for the College of Medicine, will serve as interim senior associate dean for research, effective July 1.

 

Cushman and Gillett Coauthor Paper on Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Cognition (6-26-2014)
A new study co-authored by University of Vermont Professor of Medicine Mary Cushman, M.D., and medical student Sarah Gillett, Ph.D., links cardiovascular risk factors and cognitive impairment.

 

Cardiovascular Research Institute Honors Distinguished Investigators (4-17-2014)
The Cardiovascular Research Institute of Vermont (CVRI-VT) at the University of Vermont College of Medicine and Fletcher Allen Health Care introduced six 2014 Distinguished Investigators at its relaunch celebration on April 17: Philip Ades, M.D., professor of medicine and director of cardiac rehabilitation and preventive cardiology; Joseph Brayden, Ph.D., professor of pharmacology; Martin LeWinter, M.D., professor of medicine and director of the heart failure and cardiomyopathy program; George Osol, Ph.D., professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences; Russell Tracy, Ph.D., professor of pathology and director of the UVM Laboratory for Clinical Biochemistry Research; and Kathleen Trybus, Ph.D., professor of molecular physiology and biophysics.

 

Cushman & Hematology Faculty Promote Greater Understanding of Deep-Vein Thrombosis (3-17-2014)
Each year, between 300,000 and 600,000 Americans are affected by deep-vein thrombosis (DVT), a type of blood clot that forms in a major vein of the leg or, less commonly, in the arms, pelvis, or other large veins in the body. March is National Deep Vein Thrombosis Awareness Month and several University of Vermont/Fletcher Allen Health Care clinicians are sharing their knowledge about the condition through social media, a March 24 public educational event, national media interviews, and a recent publication in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.


Cushman introduces Vermont's 2014 recipient of the Crystal Heart Award (1-31-2014)
Frank Ittleman, M.D. was named Vermont’s 2014 recipient of the Crystal Heart Award, which recognizes an individual who has contributed to the mission of the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association. Mary Cushman, M.D., M.Sc., Vermont AHA board chair and UVM professor of medicine, provided remarks about Ittleman at the event.

 

Tracy participates in Multi-center Study of Mysterious Trauma-Induced Hemorrhaging (11-14-2013)
A new five-year, $23.8 million National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant will support a multi-center, multidisciplinary study on a deadly bleeding syndrome – called coagulopathy – that occurs without warning in some trauma patients.

 

VCC Breast Cancer Conference Focuses on Healthy Lifestyles for Breast and Heart Wellness (9-30-2013)
Each year, hundreds of Vermont cancer survivors, healthcare providers, caregivers and community members attend the Annual Breast Cancer Conference, presented by the Vermont Cancer Center at the University of Vermont and Fletcher Allen Health Care.

The 2013 Vermont Breast Cancer Conference (9-13-2013)
Across the Fence produced by University of Vermont Extension discusses the 16th Annual Breast Cancer Conference.

Cushman Study Shows Small Lifestyle Changes May Have Big Impact on Reducing Stroke Risk (6-16-2013)
Making small lifestyle changes could reduce your risk of having a stroke, according to a new study published as a Rapid Access Journal Report in the American Heart Association (AHA) journal Stroke.

Fitness at 50 Linked to Less Cancer Risk (5-16-2013)
For middle-age men, good physical fitness reduces the risk of lung and colorectal cancer. And if men who are fit in their 50s do develop those cancers, as well as prostate cancer, the risk of dying appears to be lower, according to Susan Lakoski, MD, of the University of Vermont in Burlington, and colleagues.

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Last modified July 07 2014 09:53 AM