home
RSS Feed

Ecological Economics Events Calendar



Thursday, December 26, 2013

Winter Break

Day Event

Share on email

Friday, December 27, 2013

Winter Break

Day Event

Share on email

Monday, December 30, 2013

Winter Break

Day Event

Share on email

Friday, January 17, 2014

Gund Tea: Matt Burke - "In Search of Sustainable Agriculture in Contemporary Cuba"

Time: 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Location: Johnson House Conference Room
Description: Gund Teas are a weekly event at the Gund Institute. Each week there is a presenter(s) that will spend anywhere from 20 to 30 minutes on their presentation, with the remainder of the time open for discussion amongst the entire group. Open to anyone interested in attending.

Share on email

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Behavioral Economist Candidate Fangfang Tan's Seminar

Time: 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
Location: Johnson House Conference Room
Description: "Providing global public goods: Electoral delegation and cooperation"

Ms. Tan is currently working as a Research Fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Tax Law and Public Finance in Munich, Germany.

Share on email

Friday, January 24, 2014

Behavioral Economist Candidate Hillary Sackett's Seminar

Time: 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
Location: Johnson House Conference Room
Description: "Applying Experimental Auction Theory to Behavioral Environmental Economics”
   
Ms. Sackett is currently employed as an Assistant Professor of Economics at Westfield State University, Department of Economics and Business Management.

Share on email

Gund Tea: Michael Crowley - "Scaling up Sustainable Urbanism Through Peer-Learning"

Time: 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Location: Johnson House Conference Room
Description: Gund Teas are a weekly event at the Gund Institute. Each week there is a presenter(s) that will spend anywhere from 20 to 30 minutes on their presentation, with the remainder of the time open for discussion amongst the entire group. Open to anyone interested in attending.

Share on email

Friday, January 31, 2014

Gund Tea: Charles Canham - "Patterns and causes of variation in harvest regimes in eastern forests"

Time: 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Location: Johnson House Conference Room
Description: Gund Teas are a weekly event at the Gund Institute. Each week there is a presenter(s) that will spend anywhere from 20 to 30 minutes on their presentation, with the remainder of the time open for discussion amongst the entire group. Open to anyone interested in attending.

Share on email

Friday, February 7, 2014

Gund Tea: Pipa Elias - "Making 24 hours of Travel Worth the Effort: Success in the Land Use Sector at the UN Climate Negotiations"

Time: 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Location: Johnson House Conference Room
Description: Pipa Elias - "Making 24 hours of Travel Worth the Effort: Success in the Land Use Sector at the UN Climate Negotiations"
Gund Teas are a weekly event at the Gund Institute. Each week there is a presenter(s) that will spend anywhere from 20 to 30 minutes on their presentation, with the remainder of the time open for discussion amongst the entire group. Open to anyone interested in attending.

Share on email

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

Chris Golden - "Optimizing conservation and public health in viewof current environmental mega-trends"

Time: 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Location: Johnson House Conference Room
Description: Chris Golden, a colleague from Harvard working on ecosystems and human health, will be visiting Feb. 11 and 12. 

Chris has just been named Director of the HEAL project.  He's a rare combination of people with degrees in both ecology and public health, and he's working on a range of projects at this interface, from field experiments in Madagascar to global analyses (with Alicia Ellis, Brendan Fisher, Taylor Ricketts, and others).  He's in town to get to know UVM and the (small but growing) community of people working on this topic, and to discuss new collaborations under the HEAL umbrella.

Share on email

Friday, February 14, 2014

Gund Tea: Matt Cropp - "Peer-to-Peer Money? The Past, Present, and Possible Future(s) of Cryptocurrency"

Time: 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Location: Johnson House Conference Room
Description: Matt Cropp - "Peer-to-Peer Money? The Past, Present, and Possible Future(s) of Cryptocurrency"
Gund Teas are a weekly event at the Gund Institute. Each week there is a presenter(s) that will spend anywhere from 20 to 30 minutes on their presentation, with the remainder of the time open for discussion amongst the entire group. Open to anyone interested in attending.

Share on email

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

Leadership for Sustainability series with Guest Keya Chatterjee and Host Taylor Ricketts

Time: 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Location: Aiken 102
Description: What's the answer to the population question? A Zero Footprint Baby.  

Author of "The Zero Footprint Baby" and Program Director for the World Wildlife Fund, Keya will discuss her work as Director of the Renewable Energy and Footprint Outreach program and her efforts on international advocacy for Climate Change Policy.  

More information about the Rubenstein School Lecture Series: www.uvm.edu/rsenr/lectures/

Share on email

Friday, February 21, 2014

Gund Tea: Daniel Clarke - "Ecosystem Accounting in National Accounts: From the local to the global"

Time: 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Location: Johnson House Conference Room
Description: Gund Teas are a weekly event at the Gund Institute. Each week there is a presenter(s) that will spend anywhere from 20 to 30 minutes on their presentation, with the remainder of the time open for discussion amongst the entire group. Open to anyone interested in attending.

Share on email

Tuesday, February 25, 2014

Leadership for Sustainability: Annie Bourdon - Executive Directorof Carshare Vermont

Time: 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Location: Aiken 102
Description: Annie Bourdon is CarShare Vermont's founder and executive director. She is a sustainable transportation enthusiast who has been involved in the car-sharing industry since its arrival in the U.S. over a decade ago. In early 2001, she helped her two friends and mentors launch San Francisco's City CarShare, where she spent four years expanding mission-driven car-sharing throughout the Bay Area and beyond. She currently serves on City CarShare's board of directors, as well as the board of the CarSharing Association.

Series Introduction:

Seven billion and growing. Drastic global biodiversity losses. The looming spectre of global climate change. We have a long way to go to forge a sustainable future. Sustainability is a concept and value that only a minority of Americans embrace, with the remainder of the population unaware, skeptical, or unconvinced that actual behavioral change is needed.

Earth in Peril - Leaders Needed: Leadership is clearly one part building a sustainable path to our collective future. The purpose of this lecture series is to expose an audience of students, staff, faculty, and public to a variety of leaders and their stories, in order to encourage a personal path to leadership.

The weekly series for Spring of 2014 invites national and local leaders to share their stories of how they came to rise to the challenge of leadership. The collection of leaders that are participating reflects a diversity of pathways to leadership that can help us understand working for change and inspire many of us to continue to explore our own pathways to contributing to a sustainable world.

Share on email

Friday, February 28, 2014

Gund Tea: Pam Pearson - "On Thin Ice: Climate Change in the Cryosphere: How extremes have become means, and what we can do about it"

Time: 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Location: Johnson House Conference Room
Description: Gund Teas are a weekly event at the Gund Institute. Each week there is a presenter(s) that will spend anywhere from 20 to 30 minutes on their presentation, with the remainder of the time open for discussion amongst the entire group. Open to anyone interested in attending.

"Co-sponsored by the Vermont Council on World Affairs"

Share on email

Monday, March 10, 2014

Dr. Kathleen Weathers - "Ecological Puzzles and a Passion for Lakes"

Time: 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Location: Aiken 102
Description: Special Seminar: Dr. Kathleen Weathers "Ecological Puzzles and a Passion for Lakes: How Cyanobacteria, Sensors, and Cyberinfrastructure Helped Launch Scientists and Citizens into a 21st Century Experiment"

Monday, March 10, 2014
4:00-5:00pm
Aiken 102

Sponsored by the Rubenstein Ecosystem Science Lab
Contact: Jason Stockwell (jstockwe@uvm.edu)

Share on email

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Leadership for Sustainability: Nancy Bell - Conservation Fund

Time: 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Location: Aiken 102
Description: Nancy Bell is the Vermont Director for The Conservation Fund. She comes from a grass roots background with a passion for the conservation of wildlife habitat, particularly for black bears. She has been instrumental in developing the Green Mountain Bear Corridor, a 20,000 acre, 24 parcel, project that links Vermontís two units of the Green Mountain National Forest. Nancy spearheaded the Champion International Paper, a 133,000 acre project in Vermontís northeast Kingdom. She is currently working to create connective corridors between core habitats region-wide.

Series Introduction:

Seven billion and growing. Drastic global biodiversity losses. The looming spectre of global climate change. We have a long way to go to forge a sustainable future. Sustainability is a concept and value that only a minority of Americans embrace, with the remainder of the population unaware, skeptical, or unconvinced that actual behavioral change is needed.

Earth in Peril - Leaders Needed: Leadership is clearly one part building a sustainable path to our collective future. The purpose of this lecture series is to expose an audience of students, staff, faculty, and public to a variety of leaders and their stories, in order to encourage a personal path to leadership.

The weekly series for Spring of 2014 invites national and local leaders to share their stories of how they came to rise to the challenge of leadership. The collection of leaders that are participating reflects a diversity of pathways to leadership that can help us understand working for change and inspire many of us to continue to explore our own pathways to contributing to a sustainable world.

Share on email

Thursday, March 13, 2014

Burack Lecture: David Wilcove - “Case of the Killer Cookie: Logging, Oil Palm, and Biodiversity Conservation in Southeast Asia”

Time: 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Location: Frank Livak Ballroom, Davis Center
Description: UVM hosts Dr. David Wilcove, Professor of Public Affairs and Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton as a UVM Burack Distinguished Lecture.

Title: “Case of the Killer Cookie: Logging, Oil Palm, and Biodiversity Conservation in Southeast Asia”

Talk description: Throughout Southeast Asia, arguably the hottest of the world’s biodiversity hotspots, forests are being logged or converted to cropland, principally oil palm.  David will explore the ecological impacts of both forestry and agriculture on the region’s fauna and then, based on some economic studies, argue that the situation is grim but far from hopeless. Cookie aficionados should be prepared for depressing news.

Followed by a Reception in the Fireplace Lounge of the Davis Center.

Share on email

Friday, March 14, 2014

Gund Tea: Kimberly Wallin - Forest disturbances and emergent properties of forest communities

Time: 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Location: Johnson House Conference Room
Description: Gund Teas are a weekly event at the Gund Institute. Each week there is a presenter(s) that will spend anywhere from 20 to 30 minutes on their presentation, with the remainder of the time open for discussion amongst the entire group. Open to anyone interested in attending.

Share on email

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Leadership for Sustainability: Heather Furman - State Director - The Nature Conservancy Vermont

Time: 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Location: Aiken 102
Description: Heather Furman is State Director of TNC VT and is responsible for overall management of the Vermont chapter, and serves as the liaison with the Vermont Chapter Board of Trustees, the Eastern North America Division office and The Nature Conservancy's World Office. Prior to joining the Conservancy this year, Heather served as the Executive Director of Stowe Land Trust for ten years. Her earlier career was dedicated to watershed planning efforts with the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation, and later, transportation and land-use planning with the Vermont Agency of Transportation. She is a co-founder of the Climbing Resource Access Group of Vermont (CRAG-VT) a non-profit focused on land protection for recreation access and habitat. Furman has carried out conservation initiatives for the World Wildlife Fund and the U.S. Peace Corps in the Nepal Himalaya where she lived from 1995-1998, and has traveled extensively throughout Latin America and Asia. She is a graduate of The Ohio State University, Cum Laude, with a Masters of Science in Natural Resource Planning from the Rubenstein School of Environmental and Natural Resources at the University of Vermont.

Series Introduction:

Seven billion and growing. Drastic global biodiversity losses. The looming spectre of global climate change. We have a long way to go to forge a sustainable future. Sustainability is a concept and value that only a minority of Americans embrace, with the remainder of the population unaware, skeptical, or unconvinced that actual behavioral change is needed.

Earth in Peril - Leaders Needed: Leadership is clearly one part building a sustainable path to our collective future. The purpose of this lecture series is to expose an audience of students, staff, faculty, and public to a variety of leaders and their stories, in order to encourage a personal path to leadership.

The weekly series for Spring of 2014 invites national and local leaders to share their stories of how they came to rise to the challenge of leadership. The collection of leaders that are participating reflects a diversity of pathways to leadership that can help us understand working for change and inspire many of us to continue to explore our own pathways to contributing to a sustainable world.

Share on email

Friday, March 21, 2014

Gund Tea: Taylor Ricketts, Keri Bryan, Gillian Galford - "Evaluating Flood Resilience in Vermont"

Time: 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Location: Johnson House Conference Room
Description: Gund Teas are a weekly event at the Gund Institute. Each week there is a presenter(s) that will spend anywhere from 20 to 30 minutes on their presentation, with the remainder of the time open for discussion amongst the entire group. Open to anyone interested in attending.

Share on email

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Leadership for Sustainability: Chapin Spencer - Director of Public Works, City of Burlington

Time: 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Location: Aiken 102
Description: Chapin has been serving the public in many ways for many years. Currently he is the Director of Public Works for City of Burlington. He is also a Commissioner for the Chittenden County Transportation Authority. Before becoming the Director of Public Works, he was Executive Director of Local Motion Vermont. He served in the Board of the Lake Champlain Bikeways, the Flynn Center, Carshare Vermont, and the Intervale Center. He has been a City Councilor for the City of Burlington, worked at Gardener's Supply Company and the Intervale. He was also a VISTA Program Coordinator for AmeriCorps.

Series Introduction:

Seven billion and growing. Drastic global biodiversity losses. The looming spectre of global climate change. We have a long way to go to forge a sustainable future. Sustainability is a concept and value that only a minority of Americans embrace, with the remainder of the population unaware, skeptical, or unconvinced that actual behavioral change is needed.

Earth in Peril - Leaders Needed: Leadership is clearly one part building a sustainable path to our collective future. The purpose of this lecture series is to expose an audience of students, staff, faculty, and public to a variety of leaders and their stories, in order to encourage a personal path to leadership.

The weekly series for Spring of 2014 invites national and local leaders to share their stories of how they came to rise to the challenge of leadership. The collection of leaders that are participating reflects a diversity of pathways to leadership that can help us understand working for change and inspire many of us to continue to explore our own pathways to contributing to a sustainable world.

Share on email

Thursday, March 27, 2014

David Bollier: Think Like a Commoner: A Short Introduction to theLife of the Commons

Time: 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Location: Waterman 413
Description: David Bollier: Think Like a Commoner: a Short Introduction to the Life of the Commons. Thursday, March 26 at 4PM in 413 Waterman.

When people hear about common property, they often think of the tragedy of the commons, which is the notion that individuals will overuse resources that are owned in common, leading in many cases to resource degradation and collapse. In fact, common property is an ancient institution that has helped prevent serious ecological degradation and the concentration of wealth and resources in the hands of the few. The commons can also promote the cooperation needed to solve many of society’s most pressing problems. Properly understood, the commons has the capacity to solve problems that private and public ownership cannot. Come learn about the potential to rebuild the commons sector for the benefit of all from a leading expert and practitioner.

Bollier co-founded the Commons Strategies Group, is Senior Fellow at the Norman Lear Center at the USC Annenberg School for Communication, and co-founded the public interest group Public Knowledge. He has authored twelve books, and his latest, Think Like a Commoner, topped Ralph Nader's list of 10 must-read books to provoke conversation
in 2014.

Hosted by: The Department of Community Development and Applied Economics, The Rubenstein School for Natural Resources and the Environment and the Gund Institute for Ecological Economics.

Share on email

Friday, March 28, 2014

Gund Tea: Lesley-Ann Dupigny-Giroux -"Meeting UVM’s Land Grant Mission: A Reflection on the Vermont State Climate Office”

Time: 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Location: Johnson House Conference Room
Description: Gund Teas are a weekly event at the Gund Institute. Each week there is a presenter(s) that will spend anywhere from 20 to 30 minutes on their presentation, with the remainder of the time open for discussion amongst the entire group. Open to anyone interested in attending.

Share on email

Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Leadership for Sustainability: Dr. Stephen Andersen - Director ofResearch, IGSD (Institute for Governance and Sustainable Development)

Time: 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Location: Aiken 102
Description: Dr. Stephen Oliver Andersen is the American Director of Research at the Institute for Governance and Sustainability (IGSD) and is also Senior Expert Member of the Montreal Protocol Technology and Economic Assessment Panel (TEAP). From 1989 to 2012 was TEAP Co-Chair. He is considered one of the founders and leading figures in the success of the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Stratospheric Ozone Layer. His leadership is recognized in several ways. He is one of eleven United Nations Environment Program Visionaries Awards for the first 25 years of the Montreal Protocol. He was awarded the U.N. Global 500 Award that has also been earned by Jimmy Carter, Wangari Maathai, and Jane Goodall. He is also the recipient of the Service to America Career Achievement Medal.

Series Introduction:

Seven billion and growing. Drastic global biodiversity losses. The looming spectre of global climate change. We have a long way to go to forge a sustainable future. Sustainability is a concept and value that only a minority of Americans embrace, with the remainder of the population unaware, skeptical, or unconvinced that actual behavioral change is needed.

Earth in Peril - Leaders Needed: Leadership is clearly one part building a sustainable path to our collective future. The purpose of this lecture series is to expose an audience of students, staff, faculty, and public to a variety of leaders and their stories, in order to encourage a personal path to leadership.

The weekly series for Spring of 2014 invites national and local leaders to share their stories of how they came to rise to the challenge of leadership. The collection of leaders that are participating reflects a diversity of pathways to leadership that can help us understand working for change and inspire many of us to continue to explore our own pathways to contributing to a sustainable world.

Share on email

Friday, April 4, 2014

Gund Tea: Valerie Luzadis - Reframing the Economy: Citizenship Before Consumerism

Time: 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Location: Johnson House Conference Room
Description: Gund Tea: Valerie Luzadis - Reframing the Economy: Citizenship Before Consumerism

The way in which we understand and articulate our place in the economy influences our behavior. Reframing to focus on positive outcomes, understanding ourselves as citizens first rather than consumers, and developing narratives to support these views will help to move us toward more sustainable patterns of behavior and organization. A discussion about scarcity as an organizing concept for economy, citizenship v. consumerism, and the use of narrative to engage the discussion beyond the academy.


Gund Teas are a weekly event at the Gund Institute. Each week there is a presenter(s) that will spend anywhere from 20 to 30 minutes on their presentation, with the remainder of the time open for discussion amongst the entire group. Open to anyone interested in attending.

Share on email

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

Kurt Waldman: Using experimental auctions to understand how consumers and producers evaluate tradeoffs related to food and agriculture

Time: 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
Location: Johnson House Conference Room
Description: Kurt Waldman: Using experimental auctions to understand how consumers and producers evaluate tradeoffs related to food and agriculture

Kurt is a behavioral economist interested in how people make tradeoffs related to food, agriculture, and the environment. He uses experimental methods to understand consumer and producer preferences and the relationship of these preferences to policies and the creation of a sustainable agricultural landscape. He has used experimental methods in diverse contexts: to elicit farmers’ preferences for biofortified crops in Africa and to understand consumers’ perceptions of the tradeoff between the safety and quality of artisan cheese at farmers markets in the United States. He is currently working on a project using choice experiments to understand farmers’ preferences for perennial grains in Malawi and Mali. Kurt has an MS in Applied Economics from Cornell University and is completing a PhD in Food and Agriculture Policy from Michigan State University.

Share on email

Leadership for Sustainability: Mistinguette Smith - Principle, MSmith Consulting LLC

Time: 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Location: Aiken 102
Description: Mistinguette Smith is a performance consultant who helps public and nonprofit organizations to make, and measure, social change. Her approach is informed by two decades of work in public service management and organizational development, and her experience teaching health, human service, and food security leaders how to achieve strategic results by working with difference. She is also the founding director of The Black/Land Project, which gathers and amplifies stories about black people’s relationship to land and place. She is on the faculty of the Center for Whole Communities and is a trainer with the Interaction Institute for Social Change. She is a graduate of Smith College, she holds the MPA in Public and Nonprofit Management from New York University, and is certified as a diversity trainer by the Equity Institute and the US Department of Health and Human Services. She has written a play - Freedom In The Air, which is about the Montgomery Bus Boycott as network organizing. A Midwesterner by birth and a city person by nature, she lives with her wife in Northampton, MA.

Series Introduction:

Seven billion and growing. Drastic global biodiversity losses. The looming spectre of global climate change. We have a long way to go to forge a sustainable future. Sustainability is a concept and value that only a minority of Americans embrace, with the remainder of the population unaware, skeptical, or unconvinced that actual behavioral change is needed.

Earth in Peril - Leaders Needed: Leadership is clearly one part building a sustainable path to our collective future. The purpose of this lecture series is to expose an audience of students, staff, faculty, and public to a variety of leaders and their stories, in order to encourage a personal path to leadership.

The weekly series for Spring of 2014 invites national and local leaders to share their stories of how they came to rise to the challenge of leadership. The collection of leaders that are participating reflects a diversity of pathways to leadership that can help us understand working for change and inspire many of us to continue to explore our own pathways to contributing to a sustainable world.

Share on email

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Carolyn Raffensperger: Guardianship for Future Generations Becoming Great Ancestors

Time: 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Location: Johnson House Conference Room
Description: Carolyn Raffensperger, Executive Director of Science, Environmental and Health Network (SEHN), will give a talk, "Guardianship for Future Generations Becoming Great Ancestors".

She advocates our government has two functions to defend and protect rights. It is the government’s responsibility to be the steward and trustee of the commonwealth and public health. She states that future generations have rights and responsibilities too.

The public trust doctrine, with government serving as trustee on behalf of the citizenry, has been the most enduring and is part of the common law in most of the fifty U.S. states. The doctrine stands for the principle that government holds the resources of the earth in trust for the benefit of everyone within its jurisdiction.

This is conceived as an affirmative responsibility of government to manage these resources for the long-term benefit of the public. She proposes the creation of new institutions as part of a vision for the future that brings us back to life and health, and extends beyond our own generation.

Share on email

Friday, April 11, 2014

Gund Tea: Luis Garcia - Use of Remote Sensing, GIS, Modeling inwater management in areas with limited water supplies

Time: 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Location: Johnson House Conference Room
Description: Gund Tea: Luis Garcia - Use of Remote Sensing, GIS, Modeling in water management in areas with limited water supplies.

Large portions of the world (including the western US) have limited water supplies. In these regions water management is increasingly important as are issues of quality vs quantity. In many of these regions agriculture relies on irrigation to meet the water demand of the crops. This talk will touch on the use of technology (remote sensing and GIS) to quantify the water demand as well as to map some of the spatial data.

Gund Teas are a weekly event at the Gund Institute. Each week there is a presenter(s) that will spend anywhere from 20 to 30 minutes on their presentation, with the remainder of the time open for discussion amongst the entire group. Open to anyone interested in attending.

Share on email

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Leadership for Sustainability: Tracey Tsugawa - Civil Rights Investigator, Vermont Human Rights Commission

Time: 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Location: Aiken 102
Description: Tracey Tsugawa is the civil rights investigator and trainer for the Vermont Human Rights Commission (HRC). At the Commission, Tracey focuses on bullying and harassment issues in schools as well as immigrant and refugee issues. She is a founding member of CQ Strategies, a consulting group that works with non-profit and governmental entities on cultural competency, organizational development, and anti-bias work. Tracey has taught at the undergraduate and graduate levels for the past 28 years, currently teaching in the Environmental Studies Program at the University of Vermont. She also serves as a member of the Vermont State Advisory Committee for the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. Tracey lived and worked in Tokyo, Japan and Cali, Colombia. She holds a Bachelor's Degree in East Asian Studies from Oberlin College, and a Master's Degree in Education from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Series Introduction:

Seven billion and growing. Drastic global biodiversity losses. The looming spectre of global climate change. We have a long way to go to forge a sustainable future. Sustainability is a concept and value that only a minority of Americans embrace, with the remainder of the population unaware, skeptical, or unconvinced that actual behavioral change is needed.

Earth in Peril - Leaders Needed: Leadership is clearly one part building a sustainable path to our collective future. The purpose of this lecture series is to expose an audience of students, staff, faculty, and public to a variety of leaders and their stories, in order to encourage a personal path to leadership.

The weekly series for Spring of 2014 invites national and local leaders to share their stories of how they came to rise to the challenge of leadership. The collection of leaders that are participating reflects a diversity of pathways to leadership that can help us understand working for change and inspire many of us to continue to explore our own pathways to contributing to a sustainable world.

Share on email

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Marsh Professor Lecture: Amy Dickman, Warriors, Witchcraft & Women: Carnivore Ecology and Conservation in Tanzania’s Ruaha Landscape

Time: 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Location: Waterman Memorial Lounge
Description: Marsh Professor Lecture: Amy Dickman, Warriors, Witchcraft & Women: Carnivore Ecology and Conservation in Tanzania’s Ruaha Landscape

Wednesday, April 16 at 3 p.m. in Memorial Lounge, Waterman Building

UVM is hosting Amy Dickman, Kaplan Senior Research Fellow in Felid Conservation at Pembroke College, University of Oxford. She will give a free, public lecture on “Warriors, Witchcraft & Women: Carnivore Ecology and Conservation in Tanzania’s Ruaha Landscape,” Wednesday, April 16 at 3 p.m. in Memorial Lounge, Waterman Building.

Dickman, a UVM James Marsh Professor-at-Large, has more than 15 years experience working on large carnivores in Africa, specializing in big cats and human-carnivore conflict mitigation. In 2009, she established the Ruaha Carnivore Project, based in southern Tanzania. The Ruaha landscape is one of the most important areas in the world for lions, leopards, and cheetahs, but has been largely ignored by researchers, hindering the development of conservation plans. In addition, it has the highest rate of lion killing documented in East Africa, because lions and other carnivores impose high costs on poverty-stricken local people.

Dickman and her Tanzanian team are researching the ecology of these vital populations and working to reduce the pressing threat of human-carnivore conflict in this critical area. The project focuses upon reducing carnivore attacks, providing local communities with real benefits from carnivore presence and training the next generation of local conservation leaders.

The goal of the James Marsh Professors-at-Large Program is to bring outstanding individuals to campus of international distinction in the arts and humanities, sciences, social sciences and applied fields.

A reception will immediately follow the lecture in Waterman Manor.

Information: (802) 656-3186.

Share on email

Friday, April 18, 2014

Gund Tea: Subhrendu Pattanayak - Public Health Impacts of Protected Areas and Roads in the Amazon

Time: 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Location: Johnson House Conference Room
Description: Gund Tea: Subhrendu Pattanayak - Public Health Impacts of Protected Areas and Roads in the Amazon

Recent claims that ecosystem conservation generates health benefits rest on a thin empirical base. There is even less evidence on the health impacts of specific conservation policies. Subhrendu will discuss a comprehensive dataset that allows his group to investigate the effects of different types of protected areas on vector-borne diseases such as malaria and dengue, using innovative methods to address potential confounding by omitted variables. He focuses on the Brazilian Amazon because the region suffers from endemic malaria, high deforestation, and persistent poverty, even as the government actively pursues a sustainable development agenda including expansion of both protected areas and infrastructure.

Gund Teas are a weekly event at the Gund Institute. Each week there is a presenter(s) that will spend anywhere from 20 to 30 minutes on their presentation, with the remainder of the time open for discussion amongst the entire group. Open to anyone interested in attending.

Share on email

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Leadership for Sustainability: Student Synthesis

Time: 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Location: Aiken 102
Description: Series Introduction:

Seven billion and growing. Drastic global biodiversity losses. The looming spectre of global climate change. We have a long way to go to forge a sustainable future. Sustainability is a concept and value that only a minority of Americans embrace, with the remainder of the population unaware, skeptical, or unconvinced that actual behavioral change is needed.

Earth in Peril - Leaders Needed: Leadership is clearly one part building a sustainable path to our collective future. The purpose of this lecture series is to expose an audience of students, staff, faculty, and public to a variety of leaders and their stories, in order to encourage a personal path to leadership.

The weekly series for Spring of 2014 invites national and local leaders to share their stories of how they came to rise to the challenge of leadership. The collection of leaders that are participating reflects a diversity of pathways to leadership that can help us understand working for change and inspire many of us to continue to explore our own pathways to contributing to a sustainable world.

Share on email

Friday, April 25, 2014

Gund Tea: Michael Klare - Carbon Shock: Economic and Political Implications of the Revolution in Fossil Fuel Technology

Time: 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Location: Johnson House Conference Room
Description: Gund Teas are a weekly event at the Gund Institute. Each week there is a presenter(s) that will spend anywhere from 20 to 30 minutes on their presentation, with the remainder of the time open for discussion amongst the entire group. Open to anyone interested in attending.

Share on email

Friday, May 2, 2014

Gund Tea - TBA

Time: 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Location: Johnson House Conference Room
Description: Gund Teas are a weekly event at the Gund Institute. Each week there is a presenter(s) that will spend anywhere from 20 to 30 minutes on their presentation, with the remainder of the time open for discussion amongst the entire group. Open to anyone interested in attending.

Share on email

Contact UVM © 2014 The University of Vermont - Burlington, VT 05405 - (802) 656-3131