Environmental Studies at UVM

Travel Study Courses

SPRING 2014

ENVS 150 / NR 185 / PRT 188  Ecotourism & Sustainable Development in Costa Rica
11665 / 3 Credits / David Kestenbaum / Travel course to Costa Rica December 26, 2013 – January 10, 2014 with 3 TBD pre-trip meetings and 1 post-trip meeting

This course will explore the forces and processes of social change in Costa Rican communities given the rise of nature-based travel to this Central American destination. We will consider the processes of how communities involved in service sector enterprises relate to the general concepts of sustainability, including environmental, social and economic impacts. From a conceptual and operational point of view, we will explore the concept of sustainability/sustainable development (development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs), with an emphasis on community-based sustainable development. Program fee: $1990. Enrollment Limit: 16.

ENVS 150 / NR 185 / PRT 188 Communities, Conservation, and Development in Costa Rica
12079 / 3 Credits / David Kestenbaum and Walt Kuentzel/ Travel course to Costa Rica, March 1, 2014- March 9, 2014

This course will introduce students to: a) the foundations of community development and sustainability b) the fundamentals and principles of service learning, c) the methodologies of participatory rural research and rapid rural appraisal. Course material will be delivered in a service learning context that engages students in reciprocal learning relationships with community members and organizations in the buffer zone of Costa Rica’s Corcovado National Park. Program fee: $1655. Enrollment Limit: 16.

ENVS 150 / PBIO 195  Natural History and Conservation of the Galapagos Islands & Tropical Andes
14344 / 3 Credits / Monique McHenry and Pete Shear / Travel Course to Ecuador, March 1, 2014-March 9, 2014

A hands-on exploration of the unique biodiversity found in the tropical Andes and the Galapagos Islands. Students will contemplate ideas of how this great diversity came to be and learn about current conversation efforts in place that aim to protect this diversity Program Fee: $2689. Enrollment Limit: 10.

ENVS 150 / GEOG 190 The Politics of Land Use in Ecuador
13307 / 3 Credits / Pete Shear / Travel course to Ecuador December 27, 2013 – January 11, 2014

This study-abroad and service-learning course focuses on issues of land use, distribution, and reform in Ecuador. Today, social movements in Ecuador are at the global forefront of grassroots political organization and egalitarian land reform. This two-week-long course provides students with an experiential introduction to the Andean region through the historical, cultural, political, ecological, and physical geography of Ecuador. Stays with families, participatory agricultural work, lectures from Ecuadorian scholars and officials, visits to institutions, and guided hikes. Notes: Student course fee $1660; Mandatory pre-departure meetings will be announced; Prerequisite: Instructor permission. For more info contact instructor, nshear@uvm.edu. Enrollment Limit: 14.


ENVS 150 / FOR 185 / WFB 185 Conservation of Jaguars in Belize
14749 / 3 Credits / M Kessler & J Kreuzman / Hybrid Online/Travel Course to Belize / Online Portion: Jan 27 – Feb 21, Travel Portion: March 1 – March 9

This study abroad hybrid course begins with an online component to introduce students to the science and art of tracking and to examine local and regional Vermont wildlife corridor planning. In Belize students will engage wildlife researchers regarding the development of an international wildlife corridor for the jaguar and track with the biologists and indigenous wildlife trackers in the jaguar preserve. Additionally, tropical ecosystems, Mayan civilization, and human influences on biodiversity will be explored. The online component spans approximately four weeks with a workload equivalent to a 1-credit course. Students will be evaluated with a combination of field assignments and related journal reflections and discussion posts including a final project compiling and comparing their understanding of Vermont and Belize wildlife corridor conservation planning. For more info contact instructors Michael Kessler or Joe Kreuzman. Instructor permission required. Program Fee: $1508. Enrollment Limit: 15. 

 

SPRING 2013

ENVS/PSS 150 Cacao Agroforestry in Nicaragua: History, Cultivation and Geopolitics of Chocolate
12664 / 3 Credits / Christopher Shanks and Katie Goodall

Travel course to Nicaragua / December 30, 2012 – January 10, 2013 plus one or two predeparture meetings in early December / CONTINUING EDUCATION
This is a winter break travel/study course. This two-week travel course in Nicaragua will explore all levels of chocolate production, from cacao farms to chocolate product distribution, as well as the global chocolate market, geopolitics, and social justice issues within cacao farming communities. During the course we will visit cacao farms, talk to farmers, taste test varieties, make our own chocolate, and tour Nicaragua's two major chocolate companies. Students will learn cacao growing practices, history of chocolate use, and current political issues surrounding its production. This course is appropriate for anyone with an interest in agroecology, agroforestry, food systems, globalization, and social justice. Program fee: $1,069. Enrollment Limit: 12.

ENVS 150 / PRT 188 / NR 185 Ecotourism & Sustainable Development
11865 / 3 Credits / David Kestenbaum / Travel course to Costa Rica / December 26, 2012 – January 6, 2013 with 3 TBD pre-trip meetings and 1 post-trip meeting / CONTINUING EDUCATION

This is a winter break travel/study course. This course will explore the forces and processes of social change in Costa Rican communities given the rise of nature-based travel to this Central American destination. We will consider the processes of how communities involved in service sector enterprises relate to the general concepts of sustainability, including environmental, social and economic impacts. From a conceptual and operational point of view, we will explore the concept of sustainability/sustainable development (development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs), with an emphasis on community-based sustainable development. Program fee: $1674. Cross listed with PRT 188 and NR 185. Enrollment Limit: 16.

ENVS 150 / PRT 188 / NR 185 Introduction to Service Learning: Communities, Conservation, and Development in Costa Rica
12840 / 3 Credits / David Kestenbaum and Walt Kuentzel / Travel course to Costa Rica / March 1, 2013- March 10, 2013 / CONTINUING EDUCATION

This is a spring break travel/study course. This course will introduce students to: a) the foundations of community development and sustainability b) the fundamentals and principles of service learning, c) the methodologies of participatory rural research and rapid rural appraisal. Course material will be delivered in a service learning context that engages students in reciprocal learning relationships with community members and organizations in the buffer zone of Costa Rica's Corcovado National Park. Program fee $1655. Cross listed with PRT 188 and NR 185. Enrollment Limit: 16.

ENVS 150 / GEOG 190 The Politics of Land Use in Ecuador
14778 / 3 Credits / Pete Shear / Travel course to Ecuador /
December 27, 2012 – January 11, 2013 / CONTINUING EDUCATION

This is a winter break travel/study course. This study-abroad and service-learning course focuses on issues of land use, distribution, and reform in Ecuador. Today, social movements in Ecuador are at the global forefront of grassroots political organization and egalitarian land reform. This two-week-long course provides students with an experiential introduction to the Andean region through the historical, cultural, political, ecological, and physical geography of Ecuador. Stays with families, participatory agricultural work, lectures from Ecuadorian scholars and officials, visits to institutions, and guided hikes. Notes: Student course fee $1622; Mandatory pre-departure meetings will be announced; Cross-listed w/GEOG 190. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. For more info contact instructor, nshear@uvm.edu. Enrollment Limit: 20.

 

SUMMER 2012

ENVS 150 SL: Agroecology & Agroforestry Practicum
60788 / 3 credits / Chris Shanks and Katie Goodall / Travel Course to Nicaragua / May 21 - June 12

Students will travel to Nicaragua for a two-week study in the practice, application and design of agro-ecological systems. Focus will be on the agro-forestry systems that are being managed on the Island of Ometepe by organic coffee growers and the experimental agro-forest and Permaculture site of Project Bona Fide. Special focus will include: home and commercial food systems, indigenous forestry practices, medicinal plants, ethno-botany, silvo-pastoral, microclimate development, fuel and fiber crops, community development, as well as Permaculture and its role in multi-strata agroecosystems. Students will gain an understanding in agroforestry practices worldwide including examples and application techniques for temperate climates such as Vermont. Along the way students will visit fruit markets and villages as well as many sites of geologic and archeological importance. Travel and enjoyment of areas of unique natural beauty will also be featured! Cross-listed with PSS 195. Note: Program fee is $965. Enrollment Limit: 12.


ENVS 295 TR2 Application of Renewable Energy in China
60360 / 3 credits / Yun Huang and Eduardo Cotilla-Sanchez / Travel Course to China / June 18 - July 13

Students will examine how renewable energy technologies are being deployed in China in both cities and rural areas. Students will compare and contrast system deployment to American systems in the context of scale, installation practices and integration with other energy sources. In addition, the group will visit solar, wind and biomass companies in China, including manufacturing facilities and company headquarters. Corporate goals and technology innovation will be compared and contrasted with American firms. Students will meet with experts in the renewable energy sector in China including university faculty, government officials and industry leaders. The goals and expectations of renewable energy in Chinese society from these sectors will be compared and contrasted with those in the United States. Students will also gain and understanding of the countries goals of exporting technology and internal consumption of renewable technologies. For more information, please visit: http://learn.uvm.edu/studyabroad/china-flpa/. Cross-listed with CDAE 295 and NR 285. Enrollment Limit: 15.

ENVS 295 TR1 Conservation Beyond Borders
60316 / 3 credits / Saleem Ali and Todd Walters / Travel Course to the Balkans / July 2 – July 27

Conservation Beyond Borders: An experiential field expedition in the Balkans exploring the prospects of "International Peace Parks" will provide students with a unique learning opportunity, a cross-cultural experience, an introduction to the "field," and all the dynamics involved in creating and managing an International Peace Park. Designed for advanced undergraduates and graduate students interested in topics including, but not limited to, environmental studies, community development, natural resource management and peace and conflict studies. For more information, please visit: http://learn.uvm.edu/studyabroad/balkans/. Enrollment Limit: 15.


SPRING 2012

ENVS 150  A Sonoran Desert Spring: Natural History and Conservation of the American Southwest
14214 / 3 Credits / Rick Paradis / Travel course to Tuscon, Arizona March 3 – March 9, 2012 / Three on-campus course meetings
on January 26, February 16, and April 19, 5:00-7:00 pm / CONTINUING EDUCATION

This is a spring break travel/study course. From the saguaro cactus forests and indigenous Tohono O’odham people of the Sonoran Desert to the redrock canyons and Apache culture of the Chiricahua Mountains, the American Southwest offers superb opportunities to study natural history and conservation. And what better time to be there than the spring! This field course introduces participants to a geographic region of the United States that is ecologically and culturally distinct. First-hand experience is gained through direct observation and study of regional landscapes and visits to a variety of significant conservation areas. Cost: $900 plus airfare. Contact: Rick Paradis (802) 656-4055, rparadis@uvm.edu. Enrollment Limit: 12.
 
ENVS/PSS 150  Cacao Agroforestry in Nicaragua: History, Cultivation and Geopolitics of Chocolate
14211 / 3 Credits / Christopher Shanks and Katie Goodall / Travel course to Nicaragua Dec. 30-Jan. 12, 2012, plus one or two
predeparture meetings in early December / CONTINUING EDUCATION

This is a winter break travel/study course. This two-week travel course in Nicaragua will explore all levels of chocolate production, from cacao farms to chocolate product distribution, as well as the global chocolate market, geopolitics, and social justice issues within cacao farming communities. During the course we will visit cacao farms, talk to farmers, taste test varieties, make our own chocolate, and tour Nicaragua's two major chocolate companies. Students will learn cacao growing practices, history of chocolate use, and current political issues surrounding its production. This course is appropriate for anyone with an interest in agroecology, agroforestry, food systems, globalization, and social justice. Enrollment Limit: 12.

ENVS 150 / NR 185 / PRT 188  Introduction to Service Learning: Communities, Conservation, and Development in Costa Rica
14430 / 3 Credits / David Kestenbaum and Walt Kuentzel/ Travel course to Costa Rica March 2 – March 11, 2012 / CONTINUING EDUCATION

This is a spring break travel/study course. This course will introduce students to: a) the foundations of community development and sustainability b) the fundamentals and principles of service learning, c) the methodologies of participatory rural research and rapid rural appraisal. Course material will be delivered in a service learning context that engages students in reciprocal learning relationships with community members and organizations in the buffer zone of Costa Rica’s Corcovado National Park. Enrollment Limit: 16.

ENVS 150 / NR 185 / PRT 188  Ecotourism & Sustainable Development
12885 / 3 Credits / David Kestenbaum and Walt Kuentzel / Travel course to Costa Rica Dec. 30, 2011 – Jan. 13, 2012 /
CONTINUING EDUCATION

This is a winter break travel/study course. This course will explore the forces and processes of social change in Costa Rican communities given the rise of nature-based travel to this Central American destination. We will consider the processes of how communities involved in service sector enterprises relate to the general concepts of sustainability, including environmental, social and economic impacts. From a conceptual and operational point of view, we will explore the concept of sustainability/sustainable development (development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs), with an emphasis on community-based sustainable development. Enrollment Limit: 16

ENVS 150 / GEOG 190  The Politics of Land Use in Ecuador
12319 / 3 Credits / Pete Shear / Travel course to Ecuador December 27, 2011 – January 11, 2012 / CONTINUING EDUCATION

This is a winter break travel/study course. This study-abroad and service-learning course focuses on issues of land use, distribution, and reform in Ecuador. Today, social movements in Ecuador are at the global forefront of grassroots political organization and egalitarian land reform. This two-week-long course provides students with an experiential introduction to the Andean region through the historical, cultural, political, ecological, and physical geography of Ecuador. Stays with families, participatory agricultural work, lectures from Ecuadorian scholars and officials, visits to institutions, and guided hikes. Notes: Student course fee: contact course instructor; Mandatory pre-departure meetings will be announced; Cross-listed w/GEOG 190. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. For more info contact instructor, nshear@uvm.edu. Enrollment Limit: 20.

SUMMER 2011

ENVS 195 Agroecology & Agroforestry Practicum
60225 / 3 credits / Christopher Shanks / Travel Course to Nicaragua / May 23 - June 5

Students will travel to Nicaragua for a two-week study in the practice, application and design of agro-ecological systems. Focus will be on the agro-forestry systems that are being managed on the Island of Ometepe by organic coffee growers and the experimental agro-forest and Permaculture site of Project Bona Fide. Special focus will include: home and commercial food systems, indigenous forestry practices, medicinal plants, ethno-botany, silvo-pastoral, microclimate development, fuel and fiber crops, community development, as well as Permaculture and its role in multi-strata agroecosystems. Students will gain an understanding in agroforestry practices worldwide including examples and application techniques for temperate climates such as Vermont. Along the way students will visit fruit markets and villages as well as many sites of geologic and archeological importance. Travel and enjoyment of areas of unique natural beauty will also be featured. Enrollment Limit: 15 Cross listed with PSS 195 (60502)


ENVS 295 TR1 Conservation Beyond Borders
60491 / 3 credits / Saleem Ali / Travel Course to the Balkans / May 28 - June 13

Conservation Beyond Borders: An experiential field expedition in the Balkans exploring the prospects of "International Peace Parks" will provide students with a unique learning opportunity, a cross-cultural experience, an introduction to the "field," and all the dynamics involved in creating and managing an International Peace Park. Designed for advanced undergraduates and graduate students interested in topics including, but not limited to, environmental studies, community development, natural resource management and peace and conflict studies. For more information, please visit http://learn.uvm.edu/studyabroad/balkans/.

ENVS 295 TR1 Application of Renewable Energy in China
60551 / 3 credits / Anthony Rossman / Travel Course to China / June 20 - July 5

Students will examine how renewable energy technologies are being deployed in China in both cities and rural areas. The focus will be on solar photovoltaic and solar thermal with some wind and biomass. Students will compare and contrast system deployment to American systems in the context of scale, installation practices and integration with other energy sources. In addition, the group will visit solar, wind and biomass companies in China, including manufacturing facilities and company headquarters. Corporate goals and technology innovation will be compared and contrasted with American firms. Students will meet with experts in the renewable energy sector in China including university faculty, government officials and industry leaders. The goals and expectations of renewable energy in Chinese society from these sectors will be compared and contrasted with those in the United States. Students will also gain and understanding of the countries goals of exporting technology and internal consumption of solar technologies. For more information, please visit http://learn.uvm.edu/studyabroad/china-flpa/. Cross listed w/ CDAE 295 TR1 / NR 285 TR4

SPRING 2011

ENVS 150 Landscape Natural History and Conservation of the Scottish Highlands
13851 / 3 Credits / Rick Paradis / March 4-13 2011 (plus several pre- and post-trip meetings on campus in February and April, TBA) / CONTINUING EDUCATION

This field-based travel course surveys the natural and cultural history of the distinctive mountain ecosystems of the Scottish Highlands. We will also explore conservation efforts in this world-renowned mountain landscape and participate in on-site conservation and stewardship service-learning activities. Travel costs: $1,700 (approximate) includes airfare, ground transportation, lodging, food. Contact Ricj Paradis (802)656-4055, rparadis@uvm.edu. Enrollment Limit: 12.

ENVS 150 Ecotourism & Sustainable Development
14181 / 3 Credits /  David Kestenbaum / Travel course to Costa Rica Dec. 30 – Jan. 14, 2011 / CONTINUING EDUCATION

This is a winter term travel/study course. This course will explore the forces and processes of social change in Costa Rican communities given the rise of nature based travel to this Central American destination. We will consider the processes of how communities involved in service sector enterprises relate to the general concepts of sustainability, including environmental, social, and economic impacts. From a conceptual and operational point of view, we will explore the concept of sustainability/sustainable development [development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs], with an emphasis on community-based sustainable development.

ENVS 150 The Politics of Land Use in Ecuador
13475 / 3 Credits / Pete Shear / Travel course to Ecuador December 28, 2010 - January 12, 2011 / CONTINUING EDUCATION

This is a winter term travel/study course. This study abroad and service-learning course focuses on issues of land use, distribution, and reform in Ecuador. Today, social movements in Ecuador are at the global forefront of grassroots political organization and egalitarian land reform. This two-week-long course provides students with and experiential introduction to the Andean region through the historical, cultural, political, ecological, and physical geography of Ecuador. Stays with families, participatory agricultural work, lectures from Ecuadorian scholars and officials, visits to institutions, and guided hikes. Notes: Student course fee: $1580 tuition and airfare. Mandatory pre-departure meetings will be announced. Cross-listed with GEOG 190. Prerequisite: Instructor permissions. For more info contact instructor, nshear@uvm.edu. Enrollment Limit: 20.

SUMMER 2010

ENVS 195 Agroecology & Agroforestry Practicum
60879 / 3 credits / Christopher Shanks / Travel Course to Nicaragua / May 16-May 30

Students will travel to Nicaragua for a two-week study in the practice, application and design of agro-ecological systems. Focus will be on the agro-forestry systems that are being managed on the island of Ometepe by organic coffee growers, and the experimental agro-forest and permaculture site of Project Bona Fide. Special focus will include: home and commercial food systems, indigenous forestry practices, medicinal plants, ethno-botany, silvo-pastoral, microclimate development, fuel and fiber crops, community development, as well as permaculture and its role in multi-strata agroecosystems. Students will gain an understanding in agroforestry practices worldwide including examples and application techniques for temperate climates such as Vermont. Along the way students will visit fruit markets and villages as well as many sites of geologic and archeological importance. Travel and enjoyment of areas of unique natural beauty will also be featured!


ENVS 195 Arid Lands Ecology & Resource Management
60769 / 3 credits / Saleem Ali, Rick Paradis / Travel Course to New Mexico / May 24 - June 2

The New Mexico landscape of desert basins and mountain ranges harbors fascinating biological and geological diversity. The mineral resources of this region are also well known and appreciated. This field course explores the natural history of this region with a focus on desert and mountain ecology and the legacy of hard rock mineral development and its environmental and cultural legacy. Visits to national parks, forests, Native American ruins and other protected areas and to both active and abandoned mining sites will enable course participants to gain a broad appreciation of the region's natural heritage and its reliance on a place-based resource base for economic development. This exploration will take place within the context of the diverse indigenous cultures of New Mexico and the dynamic conservation and restoration activities of the region's public agencies, environmental organizations, native tribes and business ventures.

ENVS 295 TR1 Conservation Beyond Borders
60869 / 3 credits / Saleem Ali / Travel Course to the Balkans / August 2-August 20

Conservation Beyond Borders: An experiential field expedition in the Balkans exploring the prospects of "International Peace Parks" will provide students with a unique learning opportunity, a cross-cultural experience, an introduction to the "field," and all the dynamics involved in creating and managing an International Peace Park. Designed for advanced undergraduates and graduate students interested in topics including, but not limited to, environmental studies, community development, natural resource management and peace and conflict studies.

SPRING 2009

ENVS 196 TR1 The Politics of Land Use in Ecuador
13598 / 3 Credits / Pete Shear / December 28, 2008 - January 11, 2009 / Winter Session Travel Course / CONTINUING EDUCATION

Winter Session Travel Course. Student course fee is $1,580 (not including tuition and airfare). Mandatory predeparture meeting will be announced. Cross-listed w/GEOG 190. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. For more info contact instructor, nshear@uvm.edu. Enrollment Limit: 20.
ENVS 295  Comparative Landscape Ecology & Conservation: Northern New England & the Highlands of Scotland / 13554  / 4 Credits / Rick Paradis / R  4:00-6:45 pm / CONTINUING EDUCATION
Course involves 3 weekend field trips in New England and a 10-day excursion to Scotland over spring break. This course studies the natural and cultural history of mountain ecosystems and the conservation and stewardship efforts in two distinct mountain regions of the world: the Green and White Mountains of northern New England and the Scottish Highlands.  Participants will explore the relationship between the physical and ecological characteristics of mountain ecosystems and the cultural history and contemporary human communities that have evolved in these locations.  Mountains serve many functions and provide assorted services to the communities found within their landscape settings.  These include: scenic backdrops and aesthetic icons for place identity, sources for sustainable resources and development, playgrounds for various recreational pursuits, watersheds and weather makers, and habitat for local and regional biological diversity. In addition to classroom time spent discussing readings and other materials, we will undertake three weekend field trips to mountain areas in northern New England and be hosted by local conservation organizations where we will investigate the roles of such organizations along with public agencies and private businesses engaged in land protection, habitat restoration, visitor management, ecotourism and other types of development. In the Highlands of  Scotland during spring break we will visit and compare organizations, agencies, and businesses engaged in similar types of conservation and development activities. These assorted field investigations will offer opportunities to compare and contrast mountain landscapes found in different parts of the world that evolved under distinct cultural, political, and economic pressures and systems. Cross-listed w/AIS 296 Z1.  Prerequisite:  One ENVS or AIS course at the 100 level.  Enrollment Limit: 10 (5 ENVS, 5 AIS). Course Fee: $840 plus airfare.

ENVS 296 Cafe(en) Tacuba: El Salvador
14130 / TR1 / 3 Credits / Ernesto Mendez / Winter Session Travel Course.

This course is part of a sequence that starts with the PSS 003/ENVS 095 Coffee Ecologies and Livelihoods (fall semester, 3 credits), offered in the UVM campus. Here we do an in-depth overview of coffee production and consumption, from ‘bean to cup’, and with emphasis on the social and environment dimensions related to coffee roasting and consumption. For ENVS 296 we then transport ourselves to the coffee landscape of Tacuba, El Salvador, and learn how coffee is produced by different types of growers, help the Association of Organic Coffee Producers of Western El Salvador (ACOES) harvest their red, ripe beans, and engage in field agroecological and social research related to conservation and rural livelihoods. This sequence is designed to expose students to the complexity of global coffee networks, the actors that play a role in them, and the challenges and opportunities facing more ecologically sound and socially just coffee production and consumption. Through this course, students collaborate with the Community Agroecology Network (CAN), and its partner organizations in El Salvador, the Association of Organic Coffee Producers of Western El Salvador (ACOES), and Advising & Interdisciplinary research for Development and Conservation (ASINDEC). The CAN network is committed to sustaining rural livelihoods and environments by integrating Participatory Action Research, Action-education and Trade innovations. Students learn field agroecological methods and practices, and work side-by-side with local small-scale coffee farmers. A portion of your fees goes directly to ACOES, ASINDEC and CAN, and directly supports conservation and local development efforts in Tacuba. Participants will travel to beautiful tropical beaches, rain forests, and a nearby national park. Prerequisite: Permission.

SUMMER 2008

ENVS 296 EL1 Tacuba, El Salvador: Ecologies/Livelihoods in Shade Coffee Landscape
60452 / 3 Credits / Ernesto Mendez / Mon - Sun / June 10 - 24

This international field course will expose students to the beautiful coffee landscapes of El Salvador and the people that inhabit them. Students will get hands-on experience on ecological and social research methods, as we explore both the biophysical landscape, as well as the livelihoods of coffee farmers and their families. We will learn how shade coffee is grown, processed, sold, its impacts and contributions to environmental conservation, and the challenges and opportunities coffee farmers and their cooperatives are now facing. Participants will also learn about Salvadoran history, culture, politics and environmental movements, and explore some of its beautiful natural areas. Interested students should be aware that the course requires being in good physical condition, cultural sensitivity and willingness to work hard and get dirty.


ENVS 296 Z1 Agroecology, Conservation and Development in Rural Landscapes of Central America
60413 / 3 Credits / Ernesto Mendez / Mon - Fri, 9:00am - 3:00 pm / Lafaye L403 / May 16 - 30

This short-course will present students with an intensive teaching and learning experience focusing on the interrelated issues of agroecology, conservation and development in rural landscapes of Central America. From a pedagogical perspective, the course has two main components. The first is a conceptual discussion of the social and ecological issues that currently affect both people and landscapes in rural Central America. The content is interdisciplinary, and focuses on the analysis of interactions between social and ecological systems. This part of the course will be taught mainly in the mornings and will include lectures, films, organized discussions and exercises. The second part of the course will engage students to research and discuss a real life conservation and development project occurring in the rural landscapes of El Salvador, where the main instructor has been working for the last 8 years. This activity will guide students through the process of researching, planning and simulating the practical implementation of a specific project. Afternoon sessions will include working in groups, field exercises to demonstrate methodologies, discussions and presentations by students.

ENVS 204 Z1/ENVS 295 Z1  Sustainable Field Studies
60055/60056 / 3 Credits / Tom Hudspeth / Mon – Fri, 9:00 am - 4:00 pm / Lafayette / Jul 30 - Aug 3

Become familiar with some of the many Sustainability initiatives in the Greater Burlington/Northern Vermont area through extensive field trips, readings, discussions. Includes UVM, Intervale Center, Shelburne Farms, Burlington Legacy Project, ecovillages/co-housing, Living Machine, Recycle North, power plants, etc. Participants will need to have completed some reading and on-line work prior to the first class on July 30! Prerequisite: One 100-level course in ENVS or permission (656-4055 or thudspet@uvm.edu).  Enrollment Limit: 15.