Environmental Studies at UVM

Ian A. Worley Award Recipients 2014

Francesca Hall
Mackenzie Jones
Jackson Massey


Francesca Hall

Francesca Hall with wind turnbinesClass of 2015
Major: Dual Degree in Environmental Studies and Political Science
ENVS Concentration: Environmental Policy and Community Development
UVM College/School: Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources and College of Arts and Sciences
Hometown: Los Angeles, California

Q.  What are your interests and passions within the field of environmental studies?

A.  I am interested in environmental activism and community organizing. My main passion in the field is working with communities to prevent and remedy environmental injustices. I want to accomplish this through both non-profit advocacy and government work, as I believe it requires working from outside the system and from within it to bring about significant systemic change.

Q.  What do you plan to do with your funding from your Ian Worley Award? What do you hope to accomplish?

A.  I will use the award money to hold the first conference of the Vermont Student Climate Coalition (VSCC), and to provide the financial support as it gets off the ground. The VSCC, which I co-founded with a student from Middlebury College, is a cross-college collaborative network that aims to help students involved in Vermont environmental campaigns share resources and work in solidarity with one another. The goal is to increase sustainability and equity at the institutional and state levels, and to create a unified voice of the larger student population in Vermont regarding environmental issues.

Q.  Which course are you most excited to be taking this semester?

A.  ENVS 295 Law, Policy and Environmental Justice with Tracey Tsugawa. It's such a fascinating course. We're reading case law and federal statutes and understanding how environmental justice cases are resolved through judicial proceedings and executive agencies. It's interesting to see the limitations of laws and statutes as they relate to environmental justice in the U.S.

Q.  What are your future plans and goals relating to the environment?

A.  I plan to continue working as an organizer and activist around environmental and social justice issues. This fall with my co-facilitator Tyler McFarland,I will be teaching the ENVS 197 Students-Teaching-Students (STS) course called Community Organizing and Environmental Activism. After graduation I plan to travel,work for an environmental non-profit, and eventually attend law school.
 


Mackenzie Jones

Class of 2014
Major: Double major in Environmental Studies and Studio Art
ENVS Concentration: Nature, Culture and Justice
UVM College/School: College Arts and Sciences
Hometown: Darien, Connecticut

Q.  What are your interests and passions within the field of environmental studies?

A.  My interest has always been in the social and cultural sides of environmental studies. Two of my favorite courses at UVM have been ANTH 179 Environmental Anthropology and ENVS 183 Environmental Impacts of Consumerism. I am interested in creative projects like the Highline in New York City, where an abandoned urban space was reinvented to promote being outdoors, public artwork, and events. I also love spending time outside hiking, snowboarding, and swimming in the summer. This spring break my roommate and I are going camping in Yosemite National Park.

Q.  What do you plan to do with your funding from your Ian Worley Award? What do you hope to accomplish?

A.  I plan to use the award money to create a photography exhibition for my environmental studies thesis project. This project combines my passion for environmental studies and studio art. It will use photography to communicate the potential of the repair industry to reduce waste from consumption. I have been photographing the insides of different repair shops in New York City and Burlington, and interviewing the owners and employees of these businesses. The goal of my thesis is to encourage viewers to think about the life spans of the products they choose to buy, and how they could extend these life spans by utilizing the repair industry. I believe that not only does the repair industry have the potential to reduce waste from consumption, but also to cause a shift in the social aspects of consumption by to bolstering longevity in products, relationships, and livelihoods.

Q.  Which course are you most excited to be taking this semester?

A.  ENVS 170 Landscape Photography with Dan Wells. Vermont has such a beautiful landscape, and this class is a great opportunity to explore it through the unique angle of photography.

Q.  What are your future plans and goals relating to the environment?

Ultimately, I would love to be a Creative or Art Director for a company focused on supporting environmental awareness and responsibility.
 


Jackson Massey

Class of 2015
Major: Environmental Studies
Minor: Public Speech and Debate
ENVS Concentration: Conservation and Ecology
UVM College/School: College of Arts and Sciences
Hometown: Steamboat Springs, Colorado

Q.  What are your interests and passions within the field of Environmental Studies?

A.  I am passionate about conservation and am extremely interested in the role it can play in climate change adaptation. As I have pursued my Environmental Studies degree at UVM I have been fortunate enough to study abroad twice—once in the Balkans region of Eastern Europe, and once in the Okavango Delta in Botswana. Both of these experiences studying abroad have had a profound effect on the way I view conservation and the environment. They have instilled a passion for international environmental conservation with an emphasis on adapting to climate change.

Q.  What do you plan to do with your funding from your Ian Worley Award? What do you hope to accomplish?

A.  The money I received will be used to form a student organization on campus called Climate Change Adaptation and Relief Efforts, or C.A.R.E. The mission of the organization will be to organize environmentally-conscious students to participate in volunteer projects that directly increase the adaptive capacity of at-risk communities in Vermont. Example projects will include native tree planting and rain garden installations. These types of projects will mitigate the effects of flooding and help reduce run-off into the lake—two issues that have been linked to climate change. The hope is that while these volunteers are working on these projects, they will also be spreading awareness about the effects of climate change and the need to adapt. Funding will be used for transportation, t-shirts, and club start-up costs.

Q.  Which course are you most excited to be taking this semester?

A.  ENVS 188 Sustainability Science with Amy Seidl. This class incorporates a lot of systems thinking and adaptation techniques that are very relevant to my interests and the C.A.R.E. project.

Q. What are your future plans and goals relating to the environment?

I hope to continue working on C.A.R.E. so that eventually it will become an umbrella organization for similar C.A.R.E. chapters at different universities around the United States.  I hope that, eventually, CARE can become a sort of movement towards climate change adaptation, similar to the movement that has already formed around climate change mitigation. I would also like to do more research on what can be done to adapt to climate change on a global level, and perhaps find some way to extend the services of C.A.R.E. to the international community.