Jeffords Hall eco park -- a thesis come to life

Outside of Jeffords there are student-run gardens and compost bins by the plant and soil science students. There's also an eco park in the Davis Center circle--which was actually a senior thesis of a natural resource major who graduated a few years ago. He made this awesome plan to have an herb garden, a butterfly garden, some environmental art, environmental education. And it was such an awesome proposal that the university approved it; and now it is real and absolutely beautiful. So, you can hang out in the eco park. And that is just a perfect example of the different projects and research endeavors that you can do as an undergraduate student, whether it's your senior thesis or not.

The School of Business experience and outcomes

Kalkin Hall is home to the School of Business. The way that that program works is everyone is a business administration major, and then they concentrate in different areas--such as entrepreneurship, human resources, marketing, international business, business and the environment; you can also self-define your concentration, which is really unique. The Business School also has their own student services to help studies get internships right from the get-go--with Burton Snowboards, GE, various really big accounting and finance firms all over the U.S. They really help students just get right in there from the start. And they also have clubs that students can get involved with, like the Accounting Club, International Business Club. They're also the only college that requires you to have a laptop when you come to UVM.

Fletcher Allen Health Care Center and its relationship with UVM

This is the Fletcher Allen Health Care Center. There's Trauma I-ready. It's the largest hospital north of Boston, south of Montreal. They also have an incredible relationship with the university. So, for example, nursing student, that is where they do their clinicals starting their junior year. This is where pre-medical students will shadow doctors, and figure out what field of medicine they want to go into. UVM also has a great college of medicine, where a lot of their students spend time at the Fletcher Allen Health Care Center. So, that's where you're going to go if you have a real medical emergency, or UVM Health Services is closed, you can just go to the emergency room there.

Morrill Hall's many academic departments and hands-on experiences

Morrill Hall is home of the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences. Majors in that college include animal science, dietetics, food science nutrition, ecological agriculture, environmental studies, environmental science, biological sciences. And then there's this awesome department called Community Development and Applied Economics, which has a whole host of different majors and minors in it. They have community and international development, community and entrepreneurship, public communications, food systems, green building design.

And this college is really awesome, because they have a bunch of different hands-on learning experiences that you can get involved with. For example, if you really love cows and waking up at 4 o'clock in the morning, you could apply to the Cream Program, where they actually get to work on the UVM dairy farm, which is off of Main Street. So, a bunch of cows running around, and the students go there, they make sure the cows are happy and healthy and producing milk, and then all of that milk goes to Cabot Cheese, Ben & Jerry's, of course, and Hood Milk, which is pretty cool.

There are also great study-abroad opportunities within this school. For example, I'm going to St., Lucia this semester to study sustainable island development, get out of the winter for a little bit. You can also go to the Dominican Republic and study renewable energy system; you could go to Belize for an entire semester and study sustainable development. And virtually every department on campus offers some kind of study-aboard experience, whether it's for a spring semester, winter break, the few weeks in the summer time or a whole semester.

First year programs at UVM

There's also Old Mill, which is the first building ever built at UVM. It used to house all the professors, the students, the classes, the eating facilities, where they slept. That was it. UVM is a lot bigger school now. Old Mill, right now, is home to a lot of the departments in the Arts and Sciences, which is the largest of the seven colleges at UVM (it's about 50% of the student population). Departments include economics, political science, geography, women and gender studies, a lot of the social sciences.

Virtually every college offers some kind of first-year experience class. In the College of Arts and Sciences it's called the TAP Program, which stands for Teacher Advisory Program. The way it works is you take a one-semester seminar class that is taught by a UVM professor, and there are only first-year students in the class, capped at 20 students, so you get small classroom setting. So, it's a great opportunity for students who are undeclared to get a taste of something they might be interested in. It's also a great opportunity for students who are interested in a certain subject, to test out the waters, see if this is the right program for them or not. And then your professor acts as your advisor. So, they help you pick out your second-semester classes, they help you figure out what minor program might be good for you, whether this is the right major for you, whether you want a double major, a double minor--they just help you get through your first year, and make sure that you're on track and taking some of your requirements, and just moving through your undergraduate career smoothly.

There are also year-long programs that students can take, such as Integrated Study of the Earth and the Environment, the Fine Arts Integrated Program, Social Sciences and Humanities--and the awesome thing about those programs is that it has an overarching theme that students take two classes per semester around; but then you also live with those 18 other students, so you become extremely close with them. I was in the ISEE program as a first-year student, and those people are still my roommates today as a senior, which is really cool. So, you really bond with them and it helps makes the big university immediately very small.

Rowell Building's nursing facilities and nearby Dana Medical Library

Connecting the Fletcher Allen Health Care center to Rowell Building--which is home to the College of Nursing and Health Sciences--the connecting building is the Dana Medical Library. That is one of my favorite places on campus to study. Sometimes it's a little intimidating, though, because there are all these doctors sitting there, and, like, they are really intense. But I study there anyways. Next to that is Rowell, which, again, is home to the College of Nursing and Health Sciences. Majors in that include nursing, obviously, they have radiation therapy medical laboratory sciences, athletic training, sports nutrition, and they have a physical therapy graduate program, as well. They just renovated one of the floors to be a mock hospital room for the nursing students to use. They also have these dolls--life-size dolls--called simulation dolls. For example, one gives birth, which is pretty crazy. They also might have a heart palpation or a seizure, and might need an IV... So, it's great practice for the nursing students, because if they mess up it's okay, you just press the restart button. So, it's really great practice.

Engineering programs and facilities

This is Votey Hall, which is home to the College of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences. We have four different kinds of engineering at UVM. We have civil, environmental, mechanical, and electrical. The engineers work very, very, very hard at UVM. Votey is open 24 hours a day. Those students have access to it 24 hours a day, and some students do stay there all night long. They also have awesome facilities, in terms of a soils lab, a structures lab, a hydrologics lab; and they actually have a wind tunnel, where they test their experiments, which is really awesome. There are also a ton of undergraduate students either a part of research or heading up research, which is really unique to UVM because we have 10,000 undergraduate students but only 2,000 graduate students. So, a lot of the state research funding gets to go to the undergrads. Even if you're not in the math and science realm, you can still apply for some research money to do some kind of endeavor that you're interested in.

Getting around town and campus

So, this is one of the on-campus bus stops for the shuttle bus. It's called the CATS bus. UVM--our mascot is the catamount, and you'll realize, as you walk through campus, that we are absolutely in love with our mascot. For example, tour guides aren't tour guides, we're advocats; and student ID cards are CATcards; and the bus is called the CATS bus. They have bus stops all to the four different campuses, and they're open as late as the library is open, which is, typically, to midnight. But they also go on a downtown loop until 2 o'clock in the morning. And on the downtown bus stops there are always security guards there at nighttime, so you're never waiting alone, which is great. You are not allowed to have a car on campus as a first-year student, but you honestly do not need one, Burlington is a super walkable, bikeable city. We actually have a Bike Share program that is new at UVM, and students are really excited about it. You just rent out a bike with your student ID card for 2 hours, and then you can use it anywhere on campus and drop it off at the three various drop-off points. And if you return it late, you get charged, like, $1. So, it's extremely affordable. We also get free ridership for all 4 years on the city bus, Chittenden County Transportation Association. So, that can take you to the international airport and Greyhound station in South Burlington, it can take you to the Amtrak station in Essex Junction, North Beach on a beautiful day--pretty much everywhere in the Chittenden County area.

We also have a RIDEshare program at UVM. So, it's a website you can go onto. Let's say you're going home to the Boston area and you need a ride. You can go onto the website and see what other students are going home that weekend, meet some new people, exchange some gas money. I have done that a couple of times in my very small Honda Fit, which is like the smallest car that it ever exist. And we fit three students, a bunch of ski and snowbird equipment, luggage, and a classical bass.

Programs and offices housed in Waterman

This is Waterman Building, home to the president and the provost and a lot of the UVM administrators, as well as College of Education and Social Services. So, majors in that college include elementary, secondary education, pre-K, special education, music, and art education; they have social work and human development and family studies. But the great thing about the education program is that, starting their junior or senior year, students actually get to work in the Vermont school system as teachers. They have to teach four to five classes each semester, come up with what they're going to do that day in class, grade all the assignments, work with the students... So, it's a great learning experience for them; and it also kind of helps them get their foot in their door when they're about to graduate, in terms of job placement.

The Waterman Building is also home to a lot of the language departments on campus, and there are so many that you can take--anywhere from Arabic to Spanish to Italian to Portuguese to American Sign language--which is very popular--to Russian to German to... There are so many different ones. So, if you're really into languages, there are a lot to take.

And Waterman is also home to the Registrar's Office, where you would sign up for classes; Transfer Affairs; and Student Financial Services. So, that's where you want to go if you have any questions about financial aid or transferring credits.

The Learning Co-op (free tutoring for students)

The Learning Co-op, which is free tutoring for all UVM students in various subjects, they allocate one hour of tutoring per student, per class they are taking for a semester, which is typically five classes. So, that's five hours allotted for UVM students that you can take advantage of. And you can also become a Learning Co-op tutor and get paid, if you are well-versed in a certain area.

Career Services (housed in L/L)

Also in the Living/Learning complex is Career Services. And that's free just career advice for the rest of your life. From the second you're a UVM student for the rest of your life, you can utilize those resources. So, if you have a mid-life crisis, just call Career Services, they'll help you out a little bit. They help you build your résumé; they do networking events in Boston, New York, D.C., and the Burlington area every year. They have the Catamount Job Link, where they send out e-mails throughout the week about jobs in Burlington and in the U.S. that you can apply to. And, they're just very supportive staff, and kind of help guide you throughout your 4 years, as well as after you graduate.

UVM's residence halls

We have residential halls on all the four different campuses, and they're all very different from one another, they have their own little personality. And so, we have no specified res. hall on campus for a certain year, it's all integrated.

Each res. hall has a main lobby area, which students who live in the complex will have access to all the time with their student swipe ID. Typically the main lobby stays open 'til about 10 o'clock at night during the week, and then it's closed for 24 hours on the weekend. The actual hallways where students live, the entrance into those hallways are always locked, 24 hours a day. So, students just swipe in with their student ID card.

Each res. hall has their own main desk where students can take out board games, vacuums, cleaning equipment, DVDs. That's where students would receive packages. So, if your parents send you cookies, that's where you're going to go, and you'll get this e-mail being like, "You got a package!" And it's really exciting, you run down and get your package.

And then you also get your own mailbox. There's a study lounge for all students. Each res. hall also has their own game room and conference room, where there'll be different meetings. They have snack bars, they have a kitchen, either for the whole complex or every other floor. Like I said, it's very different for each res. hall on campus. The students also get 50 swipes for washing and drying per semester in the laundry room in each res. hall, which is more than you will ever need for laundry. You can also reserve washers and dryers online. That way you don't have to wait for them; or if there's a busy time before students go home for winter break or spring break, you can reserve a washer and know that you're going to get some clean clothes.

Also, when you live on campus you will be assigned a resident advisor. They do a lot of community-building activities with you and your hallmates, like a potluck dinner, or you might have an intramural sports team together. They just help you transition from being away from home. If you have any issues with the roommate, they'll help you through that. So, they're just always there for you, and they're a great resource.

Signing up for housing and roommates

The way that housing works is that you will go to orientation as a first-year student--which is in June--and you will fill out your housing and your meal contract. Housing contract has two parts to it. The first part is roommate selection. So, you can either mutually request someone, maybe someone from high school, you both go to UVM, you can request each other, or you meet someone at orientation and you really hit it off, you can request each other. Other than that, you'll be randomly assigned a roommate. And they don't do the whole eHarmony match-up questionnaire type of thing, they just ask a few simple questions, like, "When do you typically wake up and go to bed?," if you're messy or clean, if you're a smoker or a non-smoker. You cannot smoke in any of the building on campus, but it's just a lifestyle choice, which is why they match it up that way. If you don't like your roommate, you can switch after two weeks; but they give you the two-week grace period so you can kind of get to know them, give them a chance. And then you just fill out a form--it's a pretty painless process--and they'll reassign you to a different campus, hallway, res. hall, whichever. The second part of your housing contract is room selection, where you just preference your top room type choice--so, 1, 2, 3 if you want to be in a single, double, triple, quad, four-person suite, or six-person suite.

After filling out those two forms, they will randomly assign you to any of the res. halls on the four different campuses. So, as a first-year student you don't get that much control over where you live, but one way to get control over that is to apply to themed housing, and there are so many different options for that. For example, I lived in the GreenHouse my two years on campus, which is a res. hall on the athletic campus. It's actually one of the newest res. halls, and it's all suite-style living. It's for students who are interested in the environment. We do all our own composting, we have gardens, we go on hikes; we have faculty that live in the res. hall with us to help us with various projects and field trips. We also have student-led clubs that change every year, depending on what the students want to do. We've had Photography Club, Conscious Consumers, Ecological Design, the Open Mic Night Club, the Worm Composting Bin Club--so, a bunch of different things.

There's also the health and wellness res. hall, where they have yoga and cooking classes, and they have a workout facility for students to use. There is the Dewey House for Civic Engagement, which is for students interested in community service. There is the Honors College. So, if you're invited into the Honors College, you can choose to live in their res. hall, but you're not required to. And then there's the Living and Learning complex, which is themed suites. For example, there's the Global Village in the Living and Learning--which is the Italian house, the Spanish house, the Russian house, the Canada house, the carbon house, Japanese house... You get the idea, many different-country houses. And a lot of times the students have to only speak that language. Like, in the Spanish house they only speak Spanish.

Then there are other themed suites that students apply to have approved every year. So, they change every year. There has been the Harry Potter house for Muggles, the anime suite, the tea suite, the engineering and mathematical sciences suite, dance suite, pottery suite, jewelry suite, music suite--so many different things. And all of those themed housing programs have spots open for first-year students. So, if you apply to one of those, you're going to know exactly what building you're going to be in. So, that's how you get control over where you're living as a first-year student.

Getting around town and campus

So, this is one of the on-campus bus stops for the shuttle bus. It's called the CATS bus. UVM--our mascot is the catamount, and you'll realize, as you walk through campus, that we are absolutely in love with our mascot. For example, tour guides aren't tour guides, we're advocats; and student ID cards are CATcards; and the bus is called the CATS bus. They have bus stops all to the four different campuses, and they're open as late as the library is open, which is, typically, to midnight. But they also go on a downtown loop until 2 o'clock in the morning. And on the downtown bus stops there are always security guards there at nighttime, so you're never waiting alone, which is great. You are not allowed to have a car on campus as a first-year student, but you honestly do not need one, Burlington is a super walkable, bikeable city. We actually have a Bike Share program that is new at UVM, and students are really excited about it. You just rent out a bike with your student ID card for 2 hours, and then you can use it anywhere on campus and drop it off at the three various drop-off points. And if you return it late, you get charged, like, $1. So, it's extremely affordable. We also get free ridership for all 4 years on the city bus, Chittenden County Transportation Association. So, that can take you to the international airport and Greyhound station in South Burlington, it can take you to the Amtrak station in Essex Junction, North Beach on a beautiful day--pretty much everywhere in the Chittenden County area.

We also have a RIDEshare program at UVM. So, it's a website you can go onto. Let's say you're going home to the Boston area and you need a ride. You can go onto the website and see what other students are going home that weekend, meet some new people, exchange some gas money. I have done that a couple of times in my very small Honda Fit, which is like the smallest car that it ever exist. And we fit three students, a bunch of ski and snowbird equipment, luggage, and a classical bass.

Cook Commons dining facilities and meal plans

Cook Commons is one of our all-you-care-to-eat dining facilities on campus. It's inside Billings. We have three all-you-care-to-eat dining facilities on campus, which is basically just buffet-style eatery. We have 15 dining facilities on campus in total. The 12 other ones very: it might be a grab-and-go, a bagel place, a restaurant, a pub--they're all very different from each other. We have two different meal plans at UVM. One is the Unlimited Dining option. So, that's one you would use at Cook Commons, one of the all-you-care-to-eat dining facilities. So, you get an unlimited amount of blocks per semester, and you just swipe in at the entrance to the dining facility and eat to your heart's desire. You can only use the blocks at the three all-you-care-to-eat dining facilities on campus.

The other plan is called the Retail Points Plan, where you get a certain amount of points per semester, and you can use those at any of the 15 dining facilities on campus. It's basically a dollar-for-dollar equivalent. So, if you buy a $3 yogurt, you get 3 points deducted. You can also mix and match. So, the Unlimited Dining option has points and retail points has some blocks.

It really depends on what kind of eater you are what plan you want to get. For example, I was an extremely picky eater before I came to UVM, I didn't eat pizza, hamburgers, pasta sauce, spinach, cheese, like, I think I just, like ate yogurt, I guess, I didn't eat very much. But now I eat all those things, except I'm still not that into tomato sauce. But that is why I got the Retail Points Plan, because I can really change up the scenery and be a really picky eater. But let's say you're a student athlete or you eat three big sit-down meals a day. Then the Unlimited Dining option might be a better choice for you. But they also give you a 2-week grace period, where you can just figure out which dining plan is going to work out the best for you.

Also, all the 15 dining facilities on campus offer a vegan or vegetarian option. One of my favorite places to eat is the Marché on Athletic Campus. They have a vegan station, and they make the food fresh in front of you. It's always delicious. I'm not even a vegan, but it is so good. And then, if there is an allergy you have and they're not addressing it, in one of dining facilities you can just fill out a form, and they'll make meals for you.

The Honors College (housed at University Heights)

There is also the Honors College. The way that that works is students in the top 7% of the incoming class will be invited into the Honors College. You can either accept or decline. And then you will be required to take a one-semester seminar class with other Honors College students for your first two years at UVM. If you don't get invited as a first-year student, you can apply at the end of that year if you have a GPA of 3.4 or higher, and then come in as a sophomore, and, again, take a one-semester seminar class on various exciting subjects. Then, your junior year you'll take a senior-thesis planning class, because your senior year you will be required to do a thesis. They also have their own grant and research office for students who want to get fellowships or grant money, things like that.

The athletic facility, clubs, intramurals and varsity sports at UVM

Also on Athletic Campus is the athletic facility. Within the facility there is indoor and outdoor basketball courts, indoor and outdoor turf fields, indoor and outdoor track. There's a 5k loop that goes past the dairy farm. There are soccer fields, There are racquetball courts, tennis courts, a dance studio, bouldering wall, climbing wall, pool, hockey rink, a workout facility. And then there's a separate workout facility for the D1 athletes, so you're never competing with them for a treadmill or something. So, there's so much to do in the athletic facility.

They also have Campus Recreation, which is really big at UVM. You can take drop-in fitness classes, you can become a certified fitness instructor, you can take other fun classes or do intramural sports. There are three different tiers of sports at UVM. The first is D1 athletics, the varsity level. So, even though we're a small public university, we have really big school spirit, which I'm a total dork and I absolutely love. I love wearing my green and gold and saying, "Go, Cats, go!" And students can get free admission to any of the varsity-level games. But if you're going to go to a hockey game, especially against BU, which is one of our rivals, you have to get to the box office at least 10 to 15 minutes early, because tickets just sell out within 10 minutes. It's pretty insane. But they're just so much fun to go to. I actually got to--I was on ESPN for, like, 3 seconds one year when we were playing BU to get into the NCAA playoffs, which both the basketball and hockey teams have made a bunch of years, which was really exciting. We won the Frozen Four way back in the day when Tim Thomas was on the UVM hockey team.

The second tier of sports are club sports, which is virtually anything and everything you can think of, from basketball to hockey to soccer to Quidditch to Triathlon Team, Running Club, Tai kwon and jujitsu, fencing, Orchesis Dance Company, Celtic Cats, Salsa and Swing Society, Urban Flavor Stepping Team--so many different things. So, if you were competitive in high school but you don't want to continue that at the D1 level, you can still take part in club sports and get a credit per year, which is a great option.

Then, the last tier of sports are intramural sports, which are extremely popular at UVM. Students are really involved in that. And that's basically scheduled pick-up games with your friends. You just get a team together. You can play basketball, hockey, soccer, indoor soccer. Broomball is the most popular intramural sport. Instead of a hockey stick you have a broom, instead of skates you wear sneakers; and you chase a soccer ball around an ice rink.

Davis Center

This is the Davis Student Center, which was built back in 2007. It is LEED-certified gold. It's kind of the hub of campus, and connects a lot of the four different campuses together. They have an underground tunnel to help students get in between campuses in the dead of winter, it's really nice. The third floor is where the UVM Bookstore is. That's where you can buy UVM apparel, fridges, microwaves, computer equipment; students also buy their textbooks for their classes at the UVM Bookstore. They have a People's United Bank ATM on the third floor, and their full-service bank is on the first floor. There is Henderson's Café, which has the best cup of coffee on campus. Also, down the hallway is all the student clubs on campus.

First floor of the Davis Center

The first floor is kind of like Grand Central Station. It's extremely busy during class change times, because students are running in between classes. They have really comfortable study areas down there, they have a fish tank with all the Finding Nemo characters. There's the Cat Pause convenience store, and that's where you can use your CAT$cratch. And you put money onto your student ID card or your CATcard, and you can it anywhere on campus or downtown at local shops, restaurants, cab services.

There is Brennan's Pub, which is my favorite place to eat on campus. It's 98% local, organic food. That is where I tried my first-ever hamburger--that's because it was local and organic, and absolutely delicious. They also have sweet potato fries and maple milkshakes; they also have various concerts and a pub quiz night during the week, they sometimes have karaoke night, which is kind of painful to listen to... but, it's still a great place to go.

There's also Growing Vermont, which is a completely student-run business on campus. Community entrepreneurship majors came up with the business plan a few years ago, and they continue to run the business. They get all local Vermont vendors, so it's a great place to grab a souvenir from Vermont. Across from that is the CATcard office, where you can get your CATcard when you come as a for-year student. And if it's ever lost or stolen, that's where you would replace it. Next to that is the print and copy station, which is where you can send packages, send mail, get stamps, print and copy basically anything and everything.

And across from that is the coolest club ever--FeelGood--where we sell our incredible gourmet grilled cheeses. We have everything from the Cheesus Loves Me--which is my favorite sandwich, which is spinach, mushrooms, tomatoes, honey mustard, barbecue sauce (and, I add apples as a special ingredient, because it absorbs all the juices, and you bite into it and it's just... unreal). Also, the Shelburne Sandwich, which is a whole bunch of veggies and salt and pepper. Our sandwiches sell for $4, which helps end someone's hunger for a half a year--it's that easy. We typically raise $28,000 per year towards a sustainable end of hunger in our lifetime. And as FeelGood as a whole has raised $1.2 million to go towards sustainable end of hunger.

Second floor of the Davis Center

The second floor of the Davis Center is home to a lot of the dining facilities on campus. There is The Marketplace, which is soup and salad, sandwiches, yogurt, pizza, Indian food, sushi--that kind of thing. We also have our own Ben & Jerry's, of course. They have Free Cone Day every year, which is really, really fun. Tons of students line around Ben & Jerry's, and it always goes on to Main Street. We also have New World Tortilla, which is amazing burritos. My personal favorite is the Thai Chicken.

Office of Student Life (housed in the DC)

There's also the Student Life office. They basically make sure that we're not bored at UVM. And if you are bored, they actually have a "/BORED" website that you can go onto and see different clubs you can get involved with, events you can go to, places to check out on campus.

Bailey-Howe/Davis Center green fun and activities

The green that is in between the Davis Center and the Bailey-Howe Library is always very busy with students. On a really nice day, the green will be covered with students sunbathing. It will turn into the beach, a lot of frisbee throwing, picnics happening. Sometimes there are concerts on the deck outside the Davis Center. There are on-campus farmers markets. There are a lot of clubs have their tables outside that you can sign up for, or they'll have some bake sales. And right outside the library and the Davis Center was where the first-ever flash mob happened. At UVM, almost three years ago around Halloween time, they did the "Thriller" dance. It was incredible. You can check it out, just type in "uvm thriller" onto YouTube.

Bailey-Howe Library and obtaining equipment and research materials

The Bailey-Howe library is the main library on campus. It has 1.4 million volumes. It is also part of the Interlibrary Loan system. So, if there's a book that you want but UVM doesn't have it, they're send away for it at a consortium of colleges. If you really want a book at UVM, you can fill out a form to get it approved, and if it does you get first dibs on it. The first floor of the Bailey-Howe library is home to Media Services, where you can rent out virtually any DVD that's ever existed, from recent releases all the way back to Alfred Hitchcock, Charlie Chaplain... I put on reserve Deathly Hallows, Part 1, the, night of the Harry Potter, Part 2 premiere, because I wanted to watch it right before I went to the midnight premiere. You can also rent out cameras, camcorders, and other video equipment, and they have technicians down there who can help you use the equipment or upload any videos and pictures. They also have a Special Collections library downstairs.

The second floor is more the noisy floor. That's where most students are. A lot of group study happens on the second floor, the main floor of the library, because they have tables there the students will do group study at. They have a print station, so if you don't have a printer or you forgot you have a paper due in 5 minutes, you can rush to the library, print it out from a USB port or e-mail. The Cyber Café is the only place on campus open 24 hours a day. So, students can study in there all night--many of them do. They sell a lot of caffeine and pastries in the Cyber Café .

There's also the Writing Center, which is free writing tutoring for all UVM students. So, they just help UVM students transition from high-school-level writing to college-level writing, for free. Right across from them is the Reference Desk. The librarians in the library are extremely accessible, nice people. They will help you learn how to use the online databases--because there are so many of them; they'll help you cite sources correctly, which is really important; they can also help you search for a book in the 1.4 million volumes--because it's a little overwhelming your first time. At the Circulation Desk, that's where you return and take out books. You can take out 50 at a time as a undergrad student, and if you're in the Honors College you can take out 100 books at a time.

The second and third floor are the quiet floors. That is where if you opened up a bag of chips, you're going to get a lot of evil glares from students, because it is super-duper quiet on those top two floors.

Billings building

Billings is also one of my favorite buildings on campus. I'm a really big Harry Potter fan, and it's a very Hogwarts-esque building, if you're into Harry Potter. There's actually a circular study lounge area where a lot of students are hanging out throughout the day. But it's going to become a special collections library. And it's also the home to just a lot of special events on campus. I'm in the Celtic Cats, which is an Irish step-dancing group on campus. I'm not terribly great at it, but I just love Riverdance. It's like a dream come true that I get to do Irish step-dancing. And that's where we have our Irish céilí every year, where we celebrate St. Patrick's Day, teach people how to Irish step-dance, and eat a lot of soda bread. It's really fun.

Rowell Building's nursing facilities and nearby Dana Medical Library

Connecting the Fletcher Allen Health Care center to Rowell Building--which is home to the College of Nursing and Health Sciences--the connecting building is the Dana Medical Library. That is one of my favorite places on campus to study. Sometimes it's a little intimidating, though, because there are all these doctors sitting there, and, like, they are really intense. But I study there anyways. Next to that is Rowell, which, again, is home to the College of Nursing and Health Sciences. Majors in that include nursing, obviously, they have radiation therapy medical laboratory sciences, athletic training, sports nutrition, and they have a physical therapy graduate program, as well. They just renovated one of the floors to be a mock hospital room for the nursing students to use. They also have these dolls--life-size dolls--called simulation dolls. For example, one gives birth, which is pretty crazy. They also might have a heart palpation or a seizure, and might need an IV... So, it's great practice for the nursing students, because if they mess up it's okay, you just press the restart button. So, it's really great practice.