Joe Clayton

Regulation of non-muscle myosins during cytokinesis and vesicle transport.


Profile

I received my BS in Biology from UMass Amherst. Shortly after graduation, I moved up to Wilder, VT where I worked as a research technician in Mako Saito’s Lab in the Genetics Department of Dartmouth Medical School. During the 3 years that I spent studying cell-cycle regulation with Dr. Saito, I completed my MS in Clinical Research at The Dartmouth Institute.
I decided to join the CMB PhD program at UVM after living in Burlington for a few years working in a variety of clinical healthcare and research positions. The vibrant academic community in Burlington is an exciting place to pursue my research interests, while the beautiful Green Mountains provides enough wilderness to fuel my outdoor passions.

Research Description

My research is focused on the role of tropomyosins in regulating actomyosin interactions. Although all myosin motors are activated by filamentous actin, eukaryotic cells require coupling specific classes of myosins to each actin structure for diverse cellular functions, including cell motility, intracellular transport and cell division. Tropomyosins are a class of filament forming coiled-coil dimers that decorate the alpha helical groove of actin. Actomyosin regulation by tropomyosin has been extensively studied in the context of muscle cells, however, the role of tropomyosin in non-muscle cells is less defined.

Recently it has been demonstrated that tropomyosins play a critical role in regulating non-muscle myosin localization and activity. Given that loss of tropomyosin regulation has been identified as an important step in cancer metastasis, tropomyosins are potentially an attractive target for anticancer therapeutics. Using a combination of single molecule microscopy techniques, biochemical assays, and in vivo analysis of the model organism fission yeast, I am working to characterize the regulatory effect of a panel of tropomyosin isoforms on type II and type V myosins.

Selected Publications

Clayton JE, Pollard LW, Sckolnick M, Bookwalter CS, Hodges AR, Trybus KM, Lord M. Fission yeast tropomyosin specifies directed transport of myosin-V along actin cables. Mol Biol Cell. 2014 Jan;25(1):66-75. doi: 10.1091/mbc.E13-04-0200. Epub 2013 Nov 6.

Roy SH, Clayton JE, Holmen J, Beltz E, & Saito RM (2011) Control of Cdc14 activity coordinates cell cycle and development in Caenorhabditis elegans. Mechanisms of development 128(7-10):317-326.

Sammons, M.R., James, M.L., Clayton, JE, Sladewski, T.E., Sirotkin, V., and Lord, M. (2011). A calmodulin-related light chain from fission yeast that functions with myosin-I and PI 4-kinase. Journal of cell science 124, 2466-2477.

Clayton JE, Sammons MR, Stark BC, Hodges AR, & Lord M (2010) Differential regulation of unconventional fission yeast myosins via the actin track. Current biology : CB 20(16):1423-1431.

Clayton JE, van den Heuvel SJ, & Saito RM (2008) Transcriptional control of cell-cycle quiescence during C. elegans development. Developmental biology 313(2):603-613.

Recent Publications

Clayton JE, Pollard LW, Sckolnick M, Bookwalter CS, Hodges AR, Trybus KM, Lord M (2014) Fission yeast tropomyosin specifies directed transport of myosin-V along actin cables. Mol Biol Cell 25(1): 66-75.

Sammons MR, James ML, Clayton JE, Sladewski TE, Sirotkin V, Lord M (2011) A calmodulin-related light chain from fission yeast that functions with myosin-I and PI 4-kinase. J Cell Sci 124(Pt 14): 2466-77.

Clayton JE, Sammons MR, Stark BC, Hodges AR, Lord M (2010) Differential regulation of unconventional fission yeast myosins via the actin track. Curr Biol 20(16): 1423-31.

View all Clayton publications here.

Contact Info


Office: C141C Given

Lab: 140 HSRF

Lab Homepage

Mentor

   Matthew Lord, Ph.D.

Upcoming Events

  • 1/13/2015 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM
    Davis Auditorium
    TBA
    Drew Barber
  • 1/20/2015 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM
    Davis Auditorium
    TBA
    Sharath Madasu
  • 1/27/2015 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM
    Davis Auditorium
    TBA
    Filiz Korkmaz

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