The Department of German and Russian at UVM has an outstanding teaching reputation.

Our faculty have received university awards including the Kroepsch-Maurice Outstanding Faculty, The George V. Kidder Award, and Dean's Lecture awards. 

Faculty members here are serious scholars, gaining national and international recognition for their published books and articles. At the same time, they are passionate about teaching—you’ll learn from renowned scholars who are devoted to your success in the classroom.

Language, literature, and culture play the major part in the study of German and Russian at UVM. You will master basic linguistic skills first, opening the possibility of reading and studying literary texts from the Middle Ages to the present time. While a historical background is important for meaningful understanding of newer intellectual developments, greater emphasis is placed on the language and its various uses in the past two centuries.

 

German

Helga Schreckenberger Chair; Professor of German

The German curriculum reflects a commitment to both the traditions of literary studies in German and to new developments in the field. Small classes promote a highly interactive classroom atmosphere where we emphasize participation and use of the target language. Studying in German-speaking country is encouraged for a semester or the full junior year—UVM participates in study-abroad programs at the University of Salzburg, Austria, and the University of Augsburg, Germany.

Russian

students chatting

Students of Russian at the University of Vermont pursue courses in Russian language, literature and culture. In addition, majors and minors take courses in Russian/East European Global Studies in the fields of history, politics, economics and business. Many of our students enhance their Russian major or minor with a semester or a year of study in Russia on a variety of study abroad programs.

Hebrew

Gideon Bavly teaches elementary and intermediate Hebrew at UVM; Hebrew 001 is the first semester of elementary Hebrew offered in the fall semester each year. It is a four-credit course, appropriate for students with no Hebrew background or limited Hebrew knowledge. Hebrew 002, the second semester of elementary Hebrew, is offered each Spring semester. Advanced students can build on their skills by take intermediate Hebrew (Hebrew 051 and Hebrew 052).