Psychology



PSYC 095A ~ Understanding Families through Literature and Research
CRN: 93384

What do we know about how families work, how family members affect each other, and how families are influenced by culture and poverty? In this class, we explore these questions, drawing on personal experience, literature, and psychological theory and research. Students read and write extensively, keep journals documenting their reactions, view videos, and have hands-on experience with research projects, working individually and in groups. The major group assignment is a "virtual poverty project" in which group members investigate the resources available to a poor, single mother in Burlington, Vermont, and combine efforts to find a job, housing, childcare, medical care, and transportation. Assignments are designed to foster understanding of families and to stimulate critical thinking, exchange of ideas, and written and oral expression.

Requirements Satisfied: one Social Science course
Meets: Tuesday, Thursday 10:00am-11:15am
Contact: 802-656-4058, Susan.Crockenberg@uvm.edu

Susan Crockenberg: Professor of Psychology and University Scholar, studies babies and parents and wants to know how they shape each others' lives. Off campus she is a mother, grandmother, and partner of 40 years. Her special projects include working/walking to stop global warming.


PSYC 095B ~ Race, Gender, Sexuality and Violence in the Media
CRN: 93265

Through a series of topical discussions, case studies and visual presentations, students will be introduced to theory and research concerning the psychology of media images of race, racial stereotypes, gender, sex roles, sexuality and violence, and how these images shape human consciousness. The goal of the course is to give the students a basic understanding of the nature of these pervasive images and the psychological, social, and developmental impacts these images have on society and in the lives of children and adults in such areas as social prejudice, gender roles, human aggression, health, and consumer behavior.

Requirements Satisfied: one Social Science course
Meets: Tuesday, Thursday 10:00am-11:15am
Contact: 802-656-2670, Dharam.Yadav@uvm.edu

Dharam P. Yadav: Associate Professor of Psychology, teaches cross-cultural psychology, media psychology, and media communications. His areas of interest include the role of television and the internet in children's socialization pertaining to gender roles, eating disorders, alcohol use, and violence; cross-cultural communication and conflict; and the impacts of communication technologies and social networks in the diffusing innovations and community development in third world countries.


PSYC 095C ~ Understanding Families through Literature and Research
CRN: 93304

What do we know about different types of families, how families work, how family members affect each other, and how families are influenced by culture, poverty, and immigration? We explore these questions, drawing on personal experience, literature, and psychological theory and research. Students read and write extensively, keep journals documenting their reactions, view videos, and have hands-on experience with research, working individually and in groups. The major group assignment is a "virtual poverty project" in which group members take on the role of a poor, single parent just arrived in Burlington, VT, and combine efforts to find a job, housing, childcare, medical care, and transportation. Assignments are designed to foster understanding of families and to stimulate critical thinking, exchange of ideas, and written and oral expression.

Requirements Satisfied: one Social Science course
Meets: Tuesday, Thursday 1:00pm-2:15pm
Contact: 802-656-4058, Susan.Crockenberg@uvm.edu

Susan Crockenberg: Professor of Psychology and University Scholar, studies babies and parents and wants to know how they shape each other's lives. Off campus she is a mother, grandmother, and partner of 41 years. Her special projects include working/walking to stop global warming.


PSYC 095D ~ Sexual Satisfaction: Messages from the Media and Scientists
CRN: 03384

Our society sends us constant messages about sex: what we should like, what we should and should not do, what is good sex, what is bad sex. Yet how much of what we learn from the media is actually true? Are men and women really that different from each other when it comes to sexual arousal and orgasms? Do our minds and our bodies respond to sexual stimuli in the same way? Through this writing-intensive course students will learn to read scientific articles and write research papers while exploring the world of sex research. Our approach to the study of sex will look at research conducted in the fields of psychology, biology, pharmacology, anthropology, and psychiatry. Requires previous or current enrollment in PSYC 001.

Requirements Satisfied: one Social Science course
Meets: Tuesday, Thursday 8:30am-9:45am
Contact: 802-656-4110, Alessandra.Rellini@uvm.edu

Alessandra Rellini: Assistant Professor of Psychology, is a clinical psychologist and director of the Sexual Health Research Clinic at UVM. Her work has been recognized by national and international societies such as the International Academy of Sex Research and the International Society for the Study of Women's Sexual Health. Currently, Dr. Rellini and the undergraduate students working in her lab are focusing on the study of the effect of emotional responses on physiological and subjective experiences of sexual arousal in women.